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Bibliography 3: Expert Problem Solvers

What Does it Take to be an Expert Problem Solver?

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by Annie and John Selden

August 30, 1997

This is a supplement to the Research Sampler column of the same name.

Return to the Research Sampler Bibliography page or to the Research Sampler article on Problem Solving.


  1. Arcavi, A., Kessel, C., Meira, L. & Smith, J. P. III (to appear). Teaching mathematical problem solving: An analysis of an emergent classroom community. In J. Kaput, A. H. Schoenfeld & E. Dubinsky (Eds.), Research in Collegiate Mathematics Education, III, Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences, Issues in Mathematics Education, Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society.

  2. Chi, M. T., Feltovich, P. & Glaser, R. (1981). Categorization and representation of physics problems by experts and novices, Cognitive Science 5, 121-152.

  3. DeBellis, V. A. & Goldin, G. A. (1997). The affective domain in mathematical problem solving. In Proceedings of the 21st Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Vol. 2 (pp. 209-216), Lahti, Finland.

  4. DeFranco, T. C. (1996). A perspective on mathematical problem-solving expertise based on the performance of male Ph.D. mathematicians. In J. Kaput, A. H. Schoenfeld & E. Dubinsky (Eds.), Research in Collegiate Mathematics Education, II (pp. 195-213), Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences, Issues in Mathematics Education, Vol. 6, Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society.

  5. Heller, J. I. & Hungate, H. N. (1985). Implications for mathematics instruction of research in scientific problem solving. In E. A. Silver (Ed.), Teaching and Learning Mathematical Problem Solving: Multiple research perspectives (pp. 83-112). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

  6. McLeod, D. B. (1992). Research on affect in mathematics education: a reconceptualization. In D. A. Grouws (Ed.), NCTM Handbook of Research on Mathematics Teaching and Learning (pp. 575-596), New York, NY: Macmillan.

  7. McLeod, D. B. & Adams, V.M., Eds. (1989). Affect and Mathematical Problem Solving: A New Perspective, New York: Springer-Verlag.

  8. McLeod, D. B., Craviotto, C. & Ortega, M. (1990). Students' affective responses to non-routine mathematical problems: an empirical study. In Proceedings of the Fourteenth Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Vol. I (pp. 159-166), CINVESTAV, Mexico.

  9. Newell, A. & Simon, H. (1972). Human Problem Solving. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

  10. Pólya, G. (1945; 2nd edition 1957). How to Solve It. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

  11. Pólya, G. (1954). Mathematics and Plausible Reasoning; Vol. 1. Induction and Analogy in Mathematics; Vol. 2. Patterns of Plausible Inference. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

  12. Pólya, G. (1962, 1965/1981). Mathematical Discovery. (Volume 1, 1962; Volume 2, 1965). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (Combined paperback edition, 1981. New York, NY: Wiley).

  13. Reif, F. & Heller, J. I. (1982). Knowledge structure and problem solving in physics, Educational Psychologist 17, 102-127.

  14. Schoenfeld, A. H. (1985). Mathematical Problem Solving, Orlando, FL: Academic Press.

  15. Schoenfeld, A. H.* (1992). Learning to think mathematically: problem solving, metacognition, and sense making in mathematics. In D. A. Grouws (Ed.), NCTM Handbook of Research on Mathematics Teaching and Learning (pp. 334-370), New York, NY: Macmillan.

  16. Winston, P. H. (1992). Artificial Intelligence , 3rd. edition, Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

* A good overview of the research perspectives and results on problem-solving up to about 1990.

Return to Research Sampler Bibliography page or to Research Sampler article on Problem Solving.

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