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Contributed Paper Sessions

Contributed Paper Sessions

1. Best Practices for Teaching Online Courses

Thursday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. – 4:55 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 14

Online education is becoming increasingly common, and many institutions desire to offer courses online. Some faculty members are tasked with developing and teaching online courses without adequate training for doing so effectively. This session seeks to share ideas to help instructors of online courses. The focus will be on teaching courses completely online, rather than using online tools to augment a face-to-face class. Possible topics include strategies for delivering content, engaging students, fostering discussion and collaboration, and assessment in an online environment. Presentations about particular technologies useful for online classes are also welcome.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, Huntington University

Bridging the Digital Divide: Building a Sense of Community and Improving Student Engagement
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Amy Wheeler, Hondros College

Collaboration and Assessment Strategies for Teaching Online Undergraduate vs. Graduate Courses
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Magdalena Luca, MCPHS University

Fostering Online Discussion in Introductory Statistics
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Jacci White, Saint Leo University
Scott White, St. Petersburg College

Teaching Online Courses to Overseas Students
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. 
Xinlong Weng, University of Bridgeport

Getting Started in MY Online Math Class
2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m. 
Carol Hannahs, Kaplan University

Teaching Online and Face-to-Face Students in the Same Class
2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m. 
Elizabeth Miller, The Ohio State University

Creating a Community Within an On-line Class
3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Cornelius P Nelan, Quinnipiac University

Teaching an Activities Based Course Online
3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m. 
Donna Flint, South Dakota State University
Becky Diischer, South Dakota State University

Raising Standards for Math Practice Software
3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
John C Miller, The City College of The City University of New York

Living it Up with Live Binders: Organizing Faculty Shared Web 2.0 Resources
4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Lea Rosenberry, Kaplan University
Leslie Johnson, Kaplan University
Michelle Lis, Kaplan University

Using Digital Game-Based Learning in Online Math Courses
4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m. 
Tamara Eyster, Kaplan University
Lea Rosenberry, Kaplan University

Teaching Statistics Online Using Blackboard Collaborate
4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m. 
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross

2. History and Philosophy of Mathematics

This session welcomes contributions from all areas related to history and philosophy of mathematics. This includes reports on research, survey talks, and issues related to the use of history and philosophy of mathematics in the classroom.

Organizers
Robert E. Bradley, Adelphi University
Bonnie Gold, Monmouth University
Maria Zack, Point Loma Nazarene University

Sponsors:
The Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics
HOM SIGMAA
POM SIGMAA

Euler's Mathematics

Thursday, August 1, 9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 27

Leonhard Euler’s Mathematical Correspondence  - The Early Berlin Years
9:00 a.m. – 9:20 a.m.
Robert E. Bradley, Adelphi University

Vector Calculus in Euler's Fluid Mechanics
9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.
Stacy Langton, University of San Diego

Euler’s Method for a Plentiful Harvest
10:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Michael P. Saclolo, St. Edward's University

Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
Thursday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. – 5:20 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 27

Conics in the 17th Century: Claude Mydorge and After
1:00 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.
Christopher Baltus Baltus, SUNY Oswego

Christiaan Huygens's Work on the Catenary, 1690-1691
1:30 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
John Bukowski, Juniata College

The Geometric Algebra of John Wallis
2:00 p.m. – 2:20 p.m. 
Maria Zack, Point Loma Nazarene University

Newton's Writings on the Calculus
2:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Troy Larry Goodsell, Brigham Young University-Idaho

\(\textrm{Apr\'{e}s}\) 1713: Bernoulli, Montmort et Waldegrave
3:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.
David Richard Bellhouse, University of Western Ontario

George Washington's Use of Trigonometry and Logarithms
3:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m. 
Theodore J. Crackel, Papers of George Washington
V. Frederick Rickey, West Point
Joel Silverberg, Roger Williams University

Mathematics as Practiced in Colonial and Post-Colonial America
4:00 p.m. – 4:20 p.m.
Scott Guthery, Docent Press

Images of Andrew Ellicott (1754-1820)
4:30 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
Florence Fasanelli, AAAS

How Brook Taylor Got Joshua Kirby a Position
5:00 p.m. – 5:20 p.m.
Duncan J Melville, St. Lawrence University

Nineteenth Century
Friday, August 2, 2013, 8:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 26

Origins of Block Designs, Normed Algebras, and Finite Geometries: 1835 to 1892
8:30 a.m. – 8:50 a.m. 
Ezra A Brown, Virginia Tech

Monsieur François-Joseph Servois: His Life and Mathematical Contributions
9:00 a.m. – 9:20 a.m.
Salvatore John Petrilli, Adelphi University

The Definite Integral by Euler, Lagrange and Laplace from the Viewpoint of Poisson
9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.
Shigeru Masuda, Kyoto Univ

Twentieth Century, Part 1

Friday, August 2, 8:30 a.m. – 11:20 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 27

Statistics at the 1924 Toronto IMC and BAAS
8:30 a.m. – 8:50 a.m.
David Orenstein, Toronto District School Board

Fictionalism and Mathematical Practice
9:00 a.m. – 9:20 a.m.
Matthew Clemens, Keene State College

Who's That Mathematician?  No, Really, Who Is She (or He)?
9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.
Janet Beery, University of Redlands

Rational Discovery of the Natural World: An Algebraic and Geometric Answer to Steiner
10:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Robert H C Moir, Western University

Mathematical Logic and the History of Computers
10:30 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
Jonathan Seldin, University of Lethbridge

Canonical Maps: Where Do They Come From and Why Do They Matter?
11:00 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Jean-Pierre Marquis, Université de Montréal

Twentieth Century, Part 2

Friday, August 2, 2:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 26

Tools of the Table Crackers: Quantitative Methods in the History of Numerical Tables
2:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Glen Van Brummelen, Quest University

On the Chebychev Quadrature
3:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.
Roger Godard, RMC

Felix Hausdorff: We Wish for You Better Times
3:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Charlotte Simmons, University of Central Oklahoma

Using History and Philosophy in Teaching Mathematics

Friday, August 2, 3:00 p.m. – 5:20 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 27

Logic is Not Epistemology: Should Philosophy Play a Larger Role in Learning about Proofs?
3:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.
Martin E Flashman, Humboldt State University

Teaching Mathematical Ideas by the History of from Quadratic to Quartic Equations
3:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Xinlong Weng, University of Bridgeport

Playful History: A Generalizable Mesolabium for Geometer's Sketchpad
4:00 p.m. – 4:20 p.m.
J. Lyn Miller, Slippery Rock University

Historical Accuracy, Popular Books, and Videos: Three Components of a History of Math Class
4:30 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
Diana White, University of Colorado Denver

The Use of History of Mathematics as a Tool in Teaching Mathematics
5:00 p.m. – 5:20 p.m.
Santhosh Mathew, Regis College

The Arc of Time

Saturday, August 3, 8:30 a.m. – 10:20 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 27

Euclid's Treatment of the Golden Ratio
8:30 a.m. – 8:50 a.m.
Charlie Smith, Park University

Plato was Not a Mathematical Platonist
9:00 a.m. – 9:20 a.m.
Elaine Landry, University of California, Davis

Some Illustrated Comments on Selected “Magical Squares with Magical Parts”
9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.
George P.H. Styan, McGill University

Mathematical Devices at the Smithsonian: Ideas for Using Digital Collections in the Classroom
10:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Amy Shell-Gellasch, Hood College
Amy Ackerberg-Hastings, NMAH/UMUC

3. Interactions Between History and Philosophy of Mathematics

This session is geared specifically to interactions between the history and philosophy of mathematics. Talks will be expected either to approach specifically how each discipline informs the other in particular or general contexts, or to discuss issues and episodes that have implications for both the philosophy and the history of mathematics.

Organizers
Thomas Drucker, University of Wisconsin—Whitewater
Glen Van Brummelen, Quest University

Sponsors:
The Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics
HOM SIGMAA
POM SIGMAA

Part 1

Saturday, August 3, 10:30 a.m. – 11:20 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 27

Zeno Will Rise Again
10:30 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
Thomas Drucker, University of Wisconsin--Whitewater

Analysis and Synthesis in Geometry Textbooks: Who Cares?
11:00 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Amy Ackerberg-Hastings, NMAH/UMUC

Part 2 

Saturday, August 3, 2:30 p.m. – 4:50 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 27

Assimilation in Mathematics and Beyond
2:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Robert S D Thomas, University of Manitoba

Euler and the Enlightenment
3:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.
Lawrence D'Antonio, Ramapo College

Persecution of Nikolai Luzin
3:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Maryam Vulis, NCC and York College CUNY

Philosophy Etched in Stone: The Geometry of Jerusalem's 'Absalom Pillar'
4:00 p.m. – 4:20 p.m.
Roger Auguste Petry, Luther College at the University of Regina

Understanding the Interplay between the History and the Philosophy of Mathematics in Proof Mining
4:30 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
Jeff Buechner, Rutgers University 
Saul Kripke Center, CUNY GC

4. My Favorite Geometry Proof

Friday, August 2, 1:00 p.m. – 4:55 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 14

This session invites presenters to share their favorite undergraduate geometry proofs.  These proofs should be suitable for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry courses as well as for courses frequently referred to as “modern” or “higher” geometry but not those related to differential geometry or (low-level) graduate courses.  Proofs must be for theorems other than the Pythagorean Theorem.  Presenters must do the full proof, discuss how the proof fits into the course, provide information regarding prerequisite topics for the proof, and discuss associated areas with which students have difficulty and how such concerns are addressed so that students understand the proof.  Presenters are invited to discuss how they have modified the proof over time as well as to share historical information for “classic” proofs and explorations/demonstrations that they use to help students understand the associated theorem.  Abstracts should include the theorem to be proved/discussed as well as brief background information.

Organizer
Sarah L. Mabrouk, Framingham State University

Pizzas, Calzones, and Crusts: Using Symmetry to Slice up a Circle
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Michael Nathanson, Saint Mary's College of California

Heron's Formula: A Proof without Words
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Daniel E. Otero, Xavier University

Heron's Formula for the Area of a Triangle
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Diana White, University of Colorado Denver

Spherical Triangle Area and Angle Sum
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Jeff Johannes, SUNY Geneseo

The Angle Sum Theorem for Triangles on the Sphere
2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Marshall Whittlesey, California State University San Marcos

The Existence of the Nine-Point Circle for a Given Triangle
2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Stephen Andrilli, La Salle University

Ptolemy's Theorem
3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Pat Touhey, Misericordia University

When is the Inversion of Circle C over Circle k Orthogonal to Circle k?
3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Mary Platt, Salem State University

Convex Quadrilaterals
3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Braxton Carrigan, Southern CT State University

Quadrature, the Geometric Mean, Hinged Dissections, and the Purpose of Proof
4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Clark P Wells, Grand Valley State University

A Simple Proof of the Classification of Conics by the Discriminant
4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Martin E Flashman, Humboldt State University

It's Not Hyperbole: A Transforming Proof
4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m.
Thomas Q Sibley, St. John's University

5. Inquiry-Based Learning Best Practices

In many mathematics classrooms, doing mathematics means following the rules dictated by the teacher and knowing mathematics means remembering and applying these rules.  However, an inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach challenges students to create/discover mathematics.  Boiled down to its essence, IBL is a method of teaching that engages students in sense-making activities.  Students are given tasks requiring them to conjecture, experiment, explore, and solve problems.  Rather than showing facts or a clear, smooth path to a solution, the instructor guides students via well-crafted problems through an adventure in mathematical discovery.  The talks in this session will focus on IBL best practices.  We seek both novel ideas and effective approaches to IBL. Claims made should be supported by data (student responses, test scores, survey results, etc.) or anecdotal evidence.  This session will be of interest to instructors new to IBL, as well as seasoned practitioners looking for new ideas.

Organizers
Dana Campbell Ernst, Northern Arizona University
Angie Hodge, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Stan Yoshinobu, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo

Part 1

Friday, August 2, 3:20 p.m. – 5:15 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 16

Course Notes for Differential Calculus
3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m. 
Brian Loft, Sam Houston State University

Using Inquiry-Based Leaning to Define Continuity
3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Tim Boester, Wright State University

A Flipped Classroom Study in Second Semester Calculus
4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Ellie Kennedy, Northern Arizona University

Calculus - The IBL Way!
4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Janice Rech, Univeristy of Nebraska at Omaha
Angie Hodge, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Calculus Group Projects to Motivate Sequences and Series by Major
4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m.
Daniel Shifflet, Clarion University of Pennsylvania

IBL in the Time of MOOCs
5:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Olympia Nicodemi, SUNY Geneseo

Part 2

Saturday, August 3, 8:30 a.m. – 11:05 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 16

MathDL Mathematical Communication: Resources for Engaging Students in Communicating about Mathematics
8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Susan Ruff, MIT

Discovery on “Number Theory Island"
8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Martha Allen, Georgia College
Blair Dietrich, Georgia Military College

Inquiry Based Learning in a Number Theory Course for Non-Majors
9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Lauren Rose, Bard College

A Collaborative, Student-Written Textbook in a Writing Intensive, IBL Discrete Mathematics Course
9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
David Richeson, Dickinson College

From Cookbook to Toolbox: Modified Moore Method in Discrete Math and Abstract Algebra
9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Rachel Schwell, Central Connecticut State University

An IBL Proofs Course: Student Perspectives
10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Julianna Stockton, Sacred Heart University
Nicole Trommelen, Sacred Heart University
Jennifer Robillard, Sacred Heart University
Cole Matthew, Sacred Heart University
Bowers Jonathan, Sacred Heart University

Assessment in an IBL Geometry Course
10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Theron James Hitchman, University of Northern Iowa

SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations
10:55 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.
Brian Winkel, United States Military Academy

Part 3

Saturday, August 3, 1:00 p.m. – 4:55 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 16

Computer Environments Promoting Student Inquiry
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Robert Sachs, George Mason University

A Student-Centered Approach to Intermediate Algebra
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m. 
Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, Slippery Rock University

Presentation Fridays in Advanced Calculus
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m. 
Robert W Vallin, Slippery Rock University

A Bridge between IBL and Student Inquiry
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Brian Katz, Augustana College

IBL Classroom Activities Beyond Student Presentation
2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Elizabeth Thoren, University of California, Santa Barbara

Strategies for Implementing Inquiry-Based Learning in the College Mathematics Classroom
2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Erin Moss, Millersville University

IBL Teachers' Perspectives on Gettting Students to Work Together, Present, and Critique
3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Timothy Whittemore, University of Michigan
Vilma Mesa, University of Michigan

Asking Good Questions to Promote Inquiry and Mathematical Conversations
3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Christine von Renesse, Westfield State University
Volker Ecke, Westfield State University

Teachers Teaching: An Inquiry-Based Approach to Math Education
3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Cheryll Crowe, Eastern Kentucky University

Using Computer Programming to Push Students to Build Mental Frameworks for Abstraction and Generalization
4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Cynthia L. Stenger, University of North Alabama
James A. Jerkins, University of North Alabama

Creating an IBL Summer Mathematics Institute
4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Randall E Cone, VMI

Tile Flooring and Recursive Relation
4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m.
Xinlong Weng, University of Bridgeport

6. Undergraduate Research Activities in Mathematical and Computational Biology

Thursday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. – 3:55 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 15

This session will highlight research results of projects that either were conducted by undergraduates or were collaborations between undergraduates and their faculty mentors. Of particular interest are those collaborations that involve students and faculty from both mathematics and biology. As many institutions have started undergraduate research programs in this area frequently with the help of initial external funding, the session is interested in the process and logistics of starting a program and maintaining a program even after the initial funding expires. Important issues include faculty development and interdisciplinary collaboration, student preparation and selection, the structure of research programs, the acquisition of resources to support the program, and the subsequent achievements of students who participate in undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology.

The session will also feature undergraduate research projects in mathematical and computational biology which are mentored by a single faculty mentor without the support of a larger program.  We seek scholarly papers that present results from undergraduate research projects in mathematical or computational biology, discuss the creation, maintenance, or achievements of an undergraduate research program, or describe the establishment or maintenance of collaborations between faculty and students in mathematics and biology.

Organizer
Carrie Elizabeth Diaz Eaton, Unity College

Sponsor:
BIOSIGMAA

UBM Program at University of Houston-Downtown: Experiences and the Challenge to Sustain It
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Edwin Tecarro, University of Houston-Downtown
Jeong-Mi Yoon, University of Houston-Downtown
Youn-Sha Chan, University of Houston-Downtown
Akif Uzman, University of Houston-Downtown

Undergraduate Mathematical Biology Research at Truman State University
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Pam Ryan, Truman State University

Graph Theory in DNA Self-Assembly: An Early Entry Point for Interdisciplinary Student Research
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Jo Anthony Ellis-Monaghan, Saint Michael's College

Using Bioinformatic Approaches to Predict Gene Expression Based on Promoter Structure in Acute Myeloid Leukemia
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Natalie Stanley, Dickinson College

Analysis of Refined Gaussian Network Model for HIV-1 Protease
2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Jacob Liddle, Houghton College
Nicholas Fuller, Houghton College
Junkoo Park, Houghton College

A Mathematical Model of Sleep Regulation
2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Anita Kummamuri Rao, Texas Academy of Math & Science, Denton, TX

A Cognitive Neuroscience Modeling Experiment
3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Ted Theodosopoulos, Saint Ann's School
Patricia Theodosopoulos, Saint Ann's School

Undergraduate Research in Epidemic Modeling
3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Anthony DeLegge, Benedictine University

Undergraduate Research in Modeling the Response of Chaparral Shrubs to Wildfires
3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m. 
Timothy Lucas, Pepperdine University

7. Research in Mathematics for High School and Community College Students 

Friday, August 2, 1:00 p.m. – 2:55 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 16

The goal of this contributed paper session is to share appropriate problems, course descriptions, and other opportunities designed to support and encourage small research project in mathematics at the high school and community college level. Presentations that focus on examples of good problems, experiences with recruitment of students, support for both faculty and students, and presentation and publication of results are encouraged.

In 2012 there were approximately 27,000 students who took BC Calculus before entering the 12th grade. For these students, a standard course in Differential Equations, Multivariable Calculus, or Linear Algebra may be offered at their school, a local community college or university, or on- line. While these may be good courses, they do not offer high-level investigative experiences emphasizing the creative aspects of mathematical discovery, which encourages continued study in mathematics.  

Encouraging students to use their own mind is absolutely essential when working with students who are talented and interested in mathematics. Students must be working on problems that are sufficiently rich to allow for extended work on them and sufficiently interesting and engaging so that they are willing to give the problems their time and intellectual energy.  Small researchable problems offer this challenge to student creativity.

Organizer
Daniel J. Teague, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Sponsor:
SIGMAA TASHM

Good Problems are the Key to Building a High School Research Program
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Daniel J. Teague, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Studying Knot Theory with High School Students
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Gyo Taek Jin, Dept. of Mathematical Science, KAIST
Hun Kim, Korea Science Academy of KAIST

Undergraduate Math Research with Games and Puzzles
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Shenglan Yuan, LaGuardia Community College,CUNY

Structuring a Research in Mathematics Program for High School or Community College Students
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Christine E. Belledin, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Research with Zombies
2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Jean Marie Marie Linhart, Texas A&M University

Using the Gini Coefficient as a Research Project in Precalculus
2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

8. The Mathematics of Planet Earth in Research

Friday, August 2, 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 15

Earth is a dynamic and complex planet; mathematics is a tool that we can use to understand it. The North American Mathematical Sciences Institutes are sponsoring the theme of The Mathematics of Planet Earth in 2013 (MPE 2013) with the goal of showcasing the role that mathematics plays in recognizing, exploring, and solving planetary problems. In support of MPE 2013, this session seeks proposals from those who have engaged in Environmental Mathematics research. Accepted papers will be published on the SIGMAA EM website to spark conversation on theme related topics throughout the year and beyond.

Organizers
Ben Galluzzo, Shippensburg University
Monika Kiss, Saint Leo University

Sponsor:
SIGMAA EM

Modeling the Size of Raindrops
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Roger William Johnson, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology

Rate-Limited Sorption Modeling in Contaminant Transport
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
David Coulliette, Asbury University
Kenneth Rietz, Asbury University

Using Photometric Instruments to Observe and Model the South Atlantic Anomaly
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Christina Selby, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

The Impact of Temperature on Chinese Coal Demand
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Amir Y. Ahmadi, Purdue University - Agricultural Economics
Xin Zhao, Purdue University - Agricultural Economics
Daniel Ghambi, Purdue University - Agricultural Economics

9. The Mathematics of Planet Earth in the College Mathematics Curriculum

Friday, August 2, 3:05 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 15

Earth is a dynamic and complex planet; mathematics is a tool that we can use to understand it. The North American Mathematical Sciences Institutes are sponsoring the theme of “The Mathematics of Planet Earth” in 2013 (MPE 2013) with the goal of showcasing the role that mathematics plays in recognizing, exploring, and solving planetary problems. In support of MPE 2013, this session seeks proposals from those interested in integrating Environmental Mathematics issues into the typical college curriculum. Accepted papers will be published on the SIGMAA EM website to spark conversation on theme-related topics throughout this year and beyond.

Organizers
Ben Galluzzo, Shippensburg University
Monika Kiss, Saint Leo University

Sponsor:
SIGMAA EM

Motivating a Gen-Ed Math Modeling Course with Food Policy Issues - A Follow-up Report
3:05 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.
Jessica M. Libertini, University of Rhode Island

Exploring the Conversion of Alternative Energy
3:25 p.m. – 3:40 p.m.
Carrie Elizabeth Diaz Eaton, Unity College

Hurricanes : Engines of Destruction
3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 
Marc Laforest, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal

10. Recreational Mathematics: New Problems and New Solutions

As with all mathematics, recreational mathematics continues to expand through the solution of new problems and the development of novel solutions to old problems. For the purposes of this session, the definition of recreational mathematics will be a broad one. The primary guideline used to determine the suitability of a paper will be the understandability of the mathematics. Papers submitted to this session should be accessible to undergraduate students.  Novel applications as well as new approaches to old problems are welcome.  Examples of use of the material in the undergraduate classroom are encouraged.

Organizers
Paul Richard Coe, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Dominican University

Part 1

Thursday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Ballroom A

Fitch Cheney's Five Card Trick for Four or Three Cards
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Colm Mulcahy, Spelman College

Continued Fractions from a Magic Trick, A Preliminary Report
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Robert W Vallin, Slippery Rock University

Pop-Guitar-Music and Mathematics
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Duk-Hyung Lee, Asbury University

The Easiest Possible NY Times Crossword Puzzle
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Kevin Ferland, Bloomsburg University

Thinking Outside of the Box:  The Mathematics of Swirldoku
2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Michael Mulligan, PuzzMill

Nim\(^{\infty}\)
2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
John Perry, University of Southern Mississippi

Utilizing Information "Perfectly" in a Logic Puzzle
3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Blane Hollingsworth, Middle Georgia State College

Tinkering with a Mathematical Goldmine
3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Jeff Johannes, SUNY Geneseo

Parametic Equations Go to the Circus: Trochoids in Poi Flower Patterns
3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Eleanor Farrington, Massachusetts Maritime Academy

Randomly Generating a Dekaaz Poetry Form
4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Mike Pinter, Belmont University

Part 2

Friday, August 2, 8:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 16

A Brief Study of Abundant Numbers Not Divisible by Any of the First n Primes
8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Jay Lawrence Schiffman, Rowan University

Discovery of Unusual Patterns of Squares Modulo an Odd Prime
8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Roger Bilisoly, Central Connecticut State University

New Roles of an Old Puzzle: the Magic Square Problem
9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Aihua Li, Montclair State University

Solving the World's Hardest Magic Square
9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Ethan Brown, Phillips Academy Andover

Getting Hyper from Painting Cubes
9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Thomas Q Sibley, St. John's University

Rubber Sheet Photography
10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m. 
Bruce Torrence, Randolph-Macon College

Classification of Polyominoes by Spinal Character
10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
David Jacob Wildstrom, University of Louisville

11. Curriculum Development to support first year mathematics students

A common focus of university administration is student retention and graduation.  First year mathematics courses, both general education and major specific, have comparatively high drop/fail/withdraw rates.  This means that they are often scrutinized in regard to their effect on retention and graduation rates.  In this session, we would like to hear what you have been doing to respond to this scrutiny.  We hope to focus on departmental-wide efforts, rather than specific classroom approaches.  Presentations could include complete course redesign, co-requisite support courses, restructure of curriculum, departmental efforts to standardize, etc.  Note that we would like to hear about successful, in process, and unsuccessful initiatives. Presentations that include a description of the initiative along with data supporting the success or failure of these initiatives are especially encouraged. 

Organizers
Donna Flint, South Dakota State University
Becky Diischer, South Dakota State University
Charles Wesley Bingen, South Dakota State University

Part 1

Saturday, August 3, 8:30 a.m. – 11:25 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 14

Effectively Supporting First-Year Students in Precalculus and Calculus Via the Arlington-Emerging Scholars Program
8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
James Anthony Mendoza Epperson, The University of Texas at Arlington
Julie Marie Skinner Sutton, The University of Texas at Arlington

Flipping Calculus: A Departmental Project of the University of Hartford
8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Fei Xue, University of Hartford

Math Workshop for Accelerated Pathway to Calculus
9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Brandy Wiegers, National Association of Math Circles
Addie Evans, San Francisco State University, CSME
Emiliano Gomez, University of California, Berkeley

Precalculus Redesign:  The Influence of a Placement Program and the Power of a Name
9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Alison Ahlgren-Reddy, University of Illinois
Marc Harper, UCLA

The Precalculus Competency Exam: A Remediation Program for Calculus
9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Caitlin Phifer, University of Rhode Island
Jessica M. Libertini, University of Rhode Island

Variations on the Theme of Calculus Support
10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Jill Jordan, Houghton College

Developing an Integrated Mathematics Curriculum in a Health Sciences Program
10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Aminul Huq, University of Minnesota Rochester

Great Ideas in Mathematics and Interdisciplinary Connections – Restructuring Core Content to Engage and Retain Students
10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Melinda Schulteis, Concordia University, Irvine

Increasing Math Majors’ Skills, Confidence, Community and Retention with a 1st Year Course
10:50 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.
Jacqueline Dewar, Loyola Marymount University
Suzanne Larson, Loyola Marymount University
Thomas Zachariah, Loyola Marymount University

Part 2

Saturday, August 3, 1:00 p.m. – 4:55 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 14

A Re-Redesign of College Algebra: Maximizing Flexibility and Consistency
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Brian Hollenbeck, Emporia State University

College Algebra Delivered Online: An Autopsy of an Unsuccessful Initiative
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Malissa Peery, University of Tennessee
Jennifer Fowler, University of Tennessee
Charles Collins, University of Tennessee

Just Enough Algebra -- A Successful Approach to Preparing College Students
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Suzanne Ingrid Doree, Augsburg College, Minneapolis

Realigning a Service Mathematics Curriculum to Better Serve the Major Department 
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Daniel Cole, SUNY Maritime College

Supporting Large-First Year Courses with a Mathematics and Statistics Learning Center
2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m. 
Darry Andrews, The Ohio State University
Elizabeth Miller, The Ohio State University

Uniting to Support First-Year Success: A Collaboration between State Universities in Connecticut
2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Karen Santoro, Central Connecticut State University

Improved Success Rates in Developmental Math through Acceleration, Collaboration, and Technology
3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Awilda Delgado, Broward College

Implementing a Mastery-Based Format for Remedial Mathematics Courses- an Iterative Approach
3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Donna Flint, South Dakota State University
Charles Wesley Bingen, South Dakota State University

Creating an Online Math Lab
3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Stepan Paul, UC Santa Barbara
Michael Yoshizawa, UC Santa Barbara

Math Skills, An Emporium Model Modified:  What We learned from the Pilot Year
4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Mary D Shepherd, Northwest Missouri State University

Serving the Under-Resourced Student in a University Setting through Mathematics
4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m. 
Kerry Luse, Trinity Washington University
Joseph Sheridan, Trinity Washington University

Year One Results from Developmental Course Redesign
4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m.
Stephen Hardin Fast, Limestone College

12. Math Circles: Best Practices

Thursday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room17

A math circle is broadly defined as a sustained enrichment experience that brings mathematics professionals in direct contact with pre-college students and/or their teachers. Circles foster passion and excitement for deep mathematics. The SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST) supports MAA members who share an interest in initiating and coordinating math circles.

SIGMAA MCST invites speakers to report on best practices in math circles with which they are or have been associated. Talks could address effective organizational strategies, successful math circle presentations, or innovative activities for students, for instance. Ideally, talks in this session will equip individuals currently involved in a math circle with ideas for improving some aspect of their circle, while also inspiring listeners who have only begun to consider math circles.

Organizers
Tatiana Shubin, San Jose State University
Sam Vandervelde, St. Lawrence University

Sponsor:
SIGMAA MCST

A Sampler of Math Circle Problems
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
James Tanton, MAA

Math (Circles) Magic!
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Cheryll Crowe, Eastern Kentucky University

Two Circle Projects
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Elgin Johnston, Iowa State University

Circle in a Plane: Can Math Circle Activities be done with Tablets?
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Paul Andrew Zeitz, University of San Francisco

More Games for Little Wranglers
2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Edward C Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

"I Need a Drink of Water!": 10 Things to Think About When Working with Elementary Math Circle Students
2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Brandy Wiegers, National Association of Math Circles

Albany Area Math Circle: Building a Mathematical Community
3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Gili Rusak, Albany Area Math Circle

Developing Collaborative Lesson Plans for Math Enrichment
3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Lauren Rose, Bard College
Beth Goldberg, Linden Avenue Middle School, Red Hook, NY
Joy Sebesta, Bard College

Northern Colorado Math Teachers' Circle
3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado
Katherine Morrison, University of Northern Colorado
Cathleen Craviotto, University of Northern Colorado

What Happens in the Classroom of Math Teachers' Circle Participants?
4:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Diana White, University of Colorado Denver

General Contributed Paper Sessions

1. History and Philosophy of Mathematics

Thursday, August 1, 8:30 a.m. – 10:10 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 14

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

The Fourier’s Fecundity of Analytic Method or Application
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m. 
Shigeru Masuda, Kyoto University

Beyond Euclid
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
Kenneth Rietz, Asbury University

Galois and His Theory
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m. 
Philip Blau, Shawnee State University

Mathematics in the Book of Michael of Rhodes, A Fifteenth-Century Maritime Manuscript
9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m. 
Andrew Perry, Springfield College

Mathesis Universalis
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Patricia Giurgescu, Mathematical Association of America

Kempe’s Flawed Proof that Four Colors Suffice 
9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m. 
Timothy Sipka, Alma College

Recruiting and Training  Mathematicians as Codebreakers
10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Chris Christensen, Northern Kentucky University

2. Research in Graph Theory or Combinatorics

Thursday, August 1, 8:30 a.m. – 10:10 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 15

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Fuzzy Greedoids - Structure and Invariants
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Steven J. Tedford, Misericordia University

A Combinatorial Proof of the Poincare-Miranda Theorem
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
Francis Edward Su, Harvey Mudd College

2-Color Rado Numbers for \(\displaystyle\sum_{i=1}^{m-1}x_i+c=x_m\)
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
Chris Spicer, Morningside College

Harmoniously Coloring Powers of Path Graphs
9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Natacha Fontes-Merz, Westminster College

Adjacency Relationships Forced by Graph Degree Sequences
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Michael Barrus, Brigham Young University

The Birank Number of Ladder Graphs
9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.
Michael Fraboni, Moravian College

The Algebraic Connectivity of Planar Graphs
10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Jason Molitierno, Sacred Heart University

3. Probability or Statistics

Thursday, August 1, 8:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 16

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

In Quest of Fairness, Randomness and Independence
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
Leo Chosid, NYC College of Technology
Jonathan Natov, NYC College of Technology

Re-Sequencing Hypothesis Testing in an Introductory Statistics Course with Active Learning
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m. 
Aminul Huq, University of Minnesota Rochester
Wei Wei, Metropolitan State University
Heidi Hulsizer, Hampden-Sydney College

A New Class of Benford Random Variables
9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Azar Khosravani, Columbia College Chicago
Constantin Rasinariu, Columbia College Chicago

The M-Tile Means, A New Class of Measures of Central Tendency
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
David DiMarco, Neumann University
Ryan Savitz, Neumann University
Fred Savitz, Neumann University

4. Teaching Advanced Mathematics, Part 1

Thursday, August 1, 8:30 a.m. – 10:10 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 26

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Applications of Maxima to Calculus and Differential Equations
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Leon Kaganovskiy, Touro College Brooklyn Campus

Students’ Learning Journey in Linear Algebra
8:45 a.m. - 8:55 a.m.
Nermine El-Sissi, The American University in Cairo

Teaching Determinants by Rook-Arrangements
9:00 a.m. - 9:10 a.m.
Anders O.F. Hendrickson, Saint Norbert College

Bulls-Eye Jenga
9:15 a.m. - 9:25 a.m.
Michael David Smith, Lycoming College

A Sweet Way to Explore Statistics
9:30 a.m. - 9:40 a.m.
Sarah L. Mabrouk, Framingham State University

An Advanced, Applied Statistics Course for Mathematics Majors
9:45 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Pete Johnson, Eastern Connecticut State University
Marsha Davis, Eastern Connecticut State University

Curriculum Infusion of Alcohol Prevention In Probability and Statistics Courses
10:00 a.m. - 10:10 a.m.
Andrew Lazowski, Sacred Heart University

5. Research in Linear Algebra or Geometry

Thursday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 26

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

A Structured Inverse Eigenvalue Problem
1:00 p.m. – 1:10 p.m.
Keivan Hassani Monfared, University of Wyoming

Golden Triangulations
1:15 p.m. – 1:25 p.m.
Bruce Atkinson, Samford University
Braxton Carrigan, Southern CT State University

A Property of the Tangent Rectangle of the Parbelos: My Proof Compared with Tsukerman's
1:30 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.
Jonathan Sondow, New York City

Guarding a Koch Fractal Art Gallery
1:45 a.m. – 1:55 a.m.
William Roger Fuller, Ohio Northern University
Lauren Cassell, Ohio Northern University

Hidden Equilateral Triangles Inside Circles on Square Hyperbolas
2:00 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.
Genghmun Eng

Mathematics and Art on the Sphere
2:15 p.m. – 2:25 p.m.
Judith Ann Silver, Marshall University

Using a Curved Space Division Assembly, Two Plane Geometry Curves, for Partition of Linear Magnitude
2:30 p.m. – 2:40 p.m.
Alexander Louis Garron, Sand Box Geometry LLC

Identifying The Right Recursion
2:45 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Brian Kelly, Fisher College

Klein’s Hypercycles in 3D
3:00 p.m. – 3:10 p.m.
Margaret Symington, Mercer University

M\"obius Transformations Fixing Finite Sets of Points
3:15 p.m. – 3:25 p.m.
Damiano Fulghesu, Minnesota State University, Moorhead
Ishan Subedi, Minnesota State University, Moorhead

Some Not-So-Well-Known Constants Associated with the Conic Sedtions
3:30 p.m. – 3:40 p.m.
Sylvester Reese

Minima Domain Intervals, Dimensions, and How to Extend the Class 'Convex Functions'
3:45 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Marcia R Pinheiro, RGMIA

The Equivalence of the Illumination and Covering Conjectures
4:00 p.m. – 4:10 p.m.
Ryan Trelford, University of Calgary

The Complex Descartes Circle Theorem
4:15 p.m. – 4:25 p.m.
Sam Northshield, SUNY-Plattsburgh

6. Assessment, Mentoring, or Outreach

Friday, August 2, 8:30 a.m. – 11:25 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 14

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Assessment and Curving Grades
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Fariba Nowrouzi Kashan, KYSU

Getting at the (Grade) Point of Grading
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m. 
Carrie Muir, University of Colorado, Boulder

The Scarlet Letter: Assessment with a Purpose
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
M. Leigh Lunsford, Longwood University
Phillip L. Poplin, Longwood University

Placement Tests: Are Students Getting the Course They Need?
9:15 a.m.- 9:25 a.m. 
David C. Wilson, SUNY, Buffalo State
Chaitali Ghosh, SUNY, Buffalo State

High School Mathematics Competition - Females versus Males
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Carey Childers, Clarion University

Teaching Faculty How to Improve Students' Quantitative Skills through Cognitive Illusions
9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.
Frank Wang, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY

Maths Week Ireland: Lessons from a Small Island?
10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Eoin Gill, Maths Week Ireland

Outreach with Grades K-8 Teachers Impacting Pre-Service Mathematics Courses
10:15 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Matthew Haines, Augsburg College

Training Gifted Students: The Fullerton Mathematical Circle Experience
10:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Rebecca Etnyre, Cal State Fullerton
Christina Tran, California State University, Fullerton Mathematical Circle

Professor Abian Teaches a Lesson from Kelley's "General Topology"
10:45 a.m. – 10:55 a.m.
Andrew deLong Martin, Kentucky State University

The National Research Experience for Undergraduates Programs' (NREUP) Influence on Minority Students
11:00 a.m. – 11:10 a.m.
Brian Arthur Christopher, University of Northern Colorado
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado

Professional Development Training for Graduate Students:  A Different Kind of Seminar
11:15 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.
Jenna P. Carpenter, Louisiana Tech University

7. Teaching Calculus, Part 1

Friday, August 2, 8:30 a.m. – 10:25 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 15

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Assessing Maplets for Calculus: Best Practices for Instructors and Software Developers
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Douglas B Meade, University of South Carolina
Philip B Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Raymond E Patenaude, University of South Carolina
Robert Petrulis, EPRE Consulting LLC

Maplets for Calculus Expands Offerings in Precalculus, Calculus and Differential Equations
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
Philip B Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Douglas B Meade, University of South Carolina
Matthew James Barry, Texas A&M University

Using Programming to Understand Limits in a Calculus II Class
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
Amanda Harsy Ramsay, IUPUI (Indianapolis University Purdue University Indianapolis)

Video Games and Calculus
9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Derek Thompson, Trine University

iPads in the Classroom: A Departmental Project at the University of Hartford
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Mako Haruta, University of Hartford

Implementing the Flipped Classroom in a First-Year Pre-Calculus/Calculus Course
9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.
Kristen Sellke, Saint Mary's University of Minnesota
Janel Schultz, Saint Mary's University of Minnesota

SONET-MATH: Using Social Networks to Learn Mathematics
10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Lori Dunlop-Pyle, University of Central Florida
Ivan Garibay, University of Central Florida
Ozlem Garibay, University of Central Florida
Amanda Koontz Anthony, University of Central Florida

Technology Enhanced Large Calculus Lectures
10:15 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Elizabeth Miller, The Ohio State University

8. Other/Research in Applied Mathematics 

Friday, August 2, 8:30 a.m. – 10:55 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 17

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Numerical Solution of Sine-Gordon Equation by Spectral Method
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Narayan Thapa, Minot State University

Stonger Numerical Stability for Nonlinear PDEs
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
Corban Harwood, George Fox University

An Exploration in Differential Equations for Modeling Population Growth
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
Terry Jo Leiterman, St. Norbert College

A Theory of Formal Mathematical Reasoning
9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Raymond Puzio, PlanetMath.org

Comparing Reducibilities on Computably Enumerable Sets
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Brooke Andersen, Assumption College

Solvable and/or Integrable Many-Body Models on a Circle
9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.
Oksana Bihun, Concordia College at Moorhead, MN

An Assignment that Promotes a Symbiotic Relationship Between Math Pre-Service Teachers and High School Students
10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Becky Hall, Western Connecticut State University

Flipping a Math Content Course for Elementary School Teachers
10:15 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Pari Ford, University of Nebraska at Kearney

Integrating Content, Pedagogy, and Cognitive Coaching to Support K-8 Teachers' Implementation of Common Core
10:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Ekaterina Lioutikova, Univeristy of Saint Joseph (Connecticut)
Barbara Henriques, University of Saint Joseph

A Complex Calcudoku Classification
10:45 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
David Nacin, William Paterson University

9. Teaching Introductory Mathematics

Friday, August 2, 1:00 p.m. – 3:55 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 17

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

College Algebra in the High Schools
1:00 p.m. – 1:10 p.m.
Christopher Schroeder, Morehead State University

Honors College Algebra at the University of Central Missouri
1:15 p.m. – 1:25 p.m.
Dale Bachman, University of Central Missouri
Nicholas Baeth, University of Central Missouri

Using Algebra in the Classroom to Understand the Way in which Automobiles Collide
1:30 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.
Alexander G. Atwood, Suffolk County Community College

Developmental Math as a Gateway, Not a Gatekeeper
1:45 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Curtis Card, Black Hills State University
Daluss Siewert, Black Hills State University

Transforming Developmental Mathematics Classes
2:00 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.
Daluss Siewert, Black Hills State University
Curtis Card, Black Hills State University

Preparing Students for College Math: A Successful Model of One-Semester Developmental Math
2:15 p.m. – 2:25 p.m.
Pangyen Weng, Metropolitan State University

Improving Secondary School Students' Mathematics Achievement in Nigeria through the use of Tutorial Computer-Aided Instruction
2:30 p.m. – 2:40 p.m.
Solomon Abogunde Iyekekpolor, Federal University, Wukari, PMB 1020, Wukari-Nigeria

Linking “Women in Mathematics” and Middle School Girls through Mentoring
2:45 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Emek Kose, St. Mary's College of Maryland

South Carolina High Energy Mathematics Teachers' Circle: A First Year Experience – Playing It By Ear
3:00 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.
George F McNulty, University of South Carolina
Nieves F McNulty, Columbia College
Douglas B Meade, University of South Carolina
Diana White, University of Colorado Denver

From Problem Solving to Research
3:15 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Ted Theodosopoulos, Saint Ann's School

Using Projects to Support Quantitative Literacy
3:30 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Doing SoTL (Scholarship of Teaching and Learning) Projects 
3:45 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Sarah Ultan, UW-BC

10. Research in Algebra or Topology

Saturday, August 3, 8:30 a.m. – 9:55 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 15

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Bounds on Mosaic Knots
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Alan Alewine, McKendree University

Best Representations and Intervals of Uncertainty in a Weakened Topology for the Integers
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
Sean Corrigan, Saint Louis University

Understanding the Johnson Filtration of the Mapping Class Group via Geometric Topology
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
Aaron Heap, SUNY Geneseo

On the Parity of a Permutation
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Richard K. Oliver, Missoula, Montana

Semi-Simple Lie Groups Acting on Flag Manifolds
9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.
B Ntatin, Austin Peay State University

11. Teaching Calculus, Part 2

Saturday, August 3, 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 21

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Can The Beauty of Limits Be Recovered in Calculus?
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Jose Giraldo, Texas A&M University Corpus Christi

Deconstructing the Formal Definition of Limit at a Point
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
Tim Boester, Wright State University

Resequencing Calculus with an Early Multivariate Approach
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
David Dwyer, University of Evansville
Mark Gruenwald, University of Evansville
Mike Axtell, University of St. Thomas
Ken Luther, Valparaiso University
Joe Stickles, Millikin University
Nicholas Baeth, University of Central Missouri

Rigorous Calculus I Course for Biology Majors
9:15 a.m. - 9:25 a.m.
Melissa Stoner, Salisbury University

Convincing Students that Old Dogs Can Learn New Tricks
9:30 a.m. - 9:40 a.m.
Bradley James Paynter, University of Central Oklahoma

Teaching Calculus to Students who have Already Seen Calculus
9:45 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Charlotte Ann Knotts-Zides, Wofford College

Taking Math Students from 'Blah' to 'Aha!'; What Can We Do?
10:00 a.m. - 10:10 a.m.
Darja Kalajdzievska, University of Manitoba

Teaching Calculus through History, Intuition, Exploration, and Development (HIED)
10:15 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Paul Sisson, Louisiana State University Shreveport
Tibor Szarvas, Louisiana State University Shreveport

Unit Acceleration Vectors
10:30 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.
Jeffrey William Clark, Elon University

12. Teaching Introductory Mathematics, Part 2

Saturday, August 3, 8:30 a.m. – 10:25 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 17

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Behind the Scene: What the Brain Thinks the Eyes Are Seeing
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Russell Coe, Suffolk County Community College

A New Approach for the Liberal Arts Mathematics Courses
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
James Fulton, Suffolk County Community College

Belended Developmental Mathematics Courses
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
Xinlong Weng, University of Bridgeport

Helping Students Learn Geometry Using the Teacher made Manipulative
9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Hari Naraayan Upadhyaya, Scholars Home Academy

Puzzles + Games = Mathematical Thinking
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Edmund A Lamagna, University of Rhode Island

Some Different Applications of Logarithms
9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.
Brian Heinold, Mount St. Mary's University

Case Study: Student with Dyscalculia Offered History of Mathematics Course to Satisfy General Education
10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Gargi Bhattacharyya, University of Baltimore

The Challenges of Designing a Mathematics Course for Liberal Arts in a Former Soviet Republic
10:15 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Tracey McGrail, Marist College

13. Modeling and Applications

Saturday, August 3, 8:30 a.m. – 10:55 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 26

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Modeling Opportunities with Differential Equations in the Classroom
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Brian Winkel, United States Military Academy

Fractal Powers in Serrin's Swirling Vortex Solutions
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m. 
Pavel Belik, Augsburg College
Doug Dokken, University of St. Thomas
Kurt Scholz, University of St. Thomas
Mikhail Shvartsman, University of St. Thomas

Fighting Fires in Siberia
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m. 
Edward Aboufadel, Grand Valley State University
Beth Bjorkman, Grand Valley State University

Mathematical Models of a Zombie Outbreak
9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Jean Marie Marie Linhart, Texas A&M University

Generosity without Reciprocity: Computation Models of Need-Based Transfers and Risk-Pooling
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Yan Hao, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Stochastic Differential Equation Models of the Nosocomial Infection VRE
9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.
Mohammed Yahdi, Ursinus College

Modeling Preferntial Admissoins at Elite Liberal Arts Colleges
10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Sally Cockburn, Hamilton College

Ranking the Academic Output of Medical Schools in the United States Using Data Envelopment Analysis
10:15 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Brian Harris Nathanson, OptiStatim, LLC

Timbral Partial Orders
10:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Marcus Pendergrass, Hampden-Sydney College

Numerical Estimates for the Regularization of Nonautonomous Ill-Posed Problems
10:45 a.m. – 10:55 a.m.
Matthew Fury, Penn State Abington

14. Teaching Advanced Mathematics, Part 2

Saturday, August 3, 1:00 p.m. – 4:10 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 21

Organizer
Gerard Venema, Calvin College

A Simple Explanation of Stochastic Differential Equations
1:00 p.m. – 1:10 p.m. 
Blane Hollingsworth, Middle Georgia State College

Differential Equations without Derivatives
1:15 p.m. – 1:25 p.m.
Brian Sutton, Randolph-Macon College

Essay-Style Problems in Differential Equations with WeBWorK
1:30 p.m. – 1:40 p.m. 
L. Felipe Martins, Cleveland State University
Barbara Margolius, Cleveland State University

I Want it All, and I Want it Now! (Or, May I Please Graduate on Time?)
1:45 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Anna Davis, Ohio Dominican University

Teaching an Honors Seminar on Fractals for Non-Majors
2:00 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.
Christopher Sass, Young Harris College

Mathematics of Origami Honors Seminar -- Successes and Lessons Learned
2:15 p.m. – 2:25 p.m.
Vera Cherepinsky, Post University

Teachable Math in Cryptocurrency Phenomenon
2:30 p.m. – 2:40 p.m.
Maryam Vulis, NCC and York College CUNY

The 2-Column Method: A Better Way to Teach Proofs?
2:45 p.m. – 2:55 p.m. 
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University

“Where Have I Seen this Before?" - Encouraging Undergraduate Students to See Connections
3:00 p.m. – 3:10 p.m.
Antonia Cardwell, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Transformative Learning in an Analysis Course: A Tactile Approach
3:15 p.m. – 3:25 p.m.
Kristi Karber, University of Central Oklahoma

The Constant of Integration
3:30 p.m. – 3:40 p.m.
Marian Anton, Central Connecticut State University

Adapted Sequence/Function Project
3:45 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University

Native American-Based Mathematics Materials for Integration into Undergraduate Courses
4:00 p.m. - 4:10 p.m.
Charles Funkhouser, California State University Fullerton
Miles R Pfahl, Turtle Mountain Community College

15. Research in Number Theory

Saturday, August 3, 1:00 p.m. – 2:25 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 22

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Class Numbers and Continued Fraction Expansions
1:00 p.m. – 1:10 p.m.
Mark Bauer, University of Calgary
Richard Guy, University of Calgary
Michael Katsuris Wanless, University of Calgary
Colin Weir, University of Calgary

Distributions of Sequences Modulo 1: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
1:15 p.m. – 1:25 p.m.
Paul Spiegelhalter, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Independent Divisibility Pairs on the Set of Integers from $1$ to $N$
1:30 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.
Rosemary Sullivan, West Chester University of PA

Equality of Cardinality of Sets of Subsets with Cardinality Congruent to Values Modulo $k$
1:45 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
John Pesek, University of Delaware

A Delightful Interconnection Between Pythagorean Triples and Fibonacci-Like Sequences
2:00 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.
Jay Lawrence Schiffman, Rowan University

Squares and Pythagorean Triples II
2:15 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Frederick Donald Chichester, Montclair Tutoring Center

16. Mathematics and Technology/Research in Analysis

Saturday, August 3, 1:00 p.m. – 3:25 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 26

Organizers
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Are You Ready for R
1:00 p.m. – 1:10 p.m. 
Joseph Manthey, University of Saint Joseph, West Hartford, CT

Applets Embedded in WeBWorK Homework Problems
1:15 p.m. – 1:25 p.m.
Barbara Margolius, Cleveland State University

Using Lurch in an Introduction to Proofs Course
1:30 p.m. – 1:40 p.m. 
Nathan Carter, Bentley University
Kenneth G. Monks, University of Scranton

Technology in the Mathematics Classroom
1:45 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Helmut Knaust, The University of Texas at El Paso

Creating and Analyzing Chaotic Attractors Using Mathematica
2:00 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.
Ulrich Hoensch, Rocky Mountain College

An Introduction to Formal Laurent Series
2:15 p.m. – 2:25 p.m.
Xiao-Xiong Gan, Morgan State University

Classifying Rational Points in Generalized Cantor Sets and Cantor Like Sets
2:30 p.m. – 2:40 p.m.
Douglas Daniel, Presbyterian College

Geometric Approach to the Computation of Certain Definite Integrals
2:45 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Sergei Artamoshin, CCSU

Traveling Wave Solutions of the Porous Medium Equation
3:00 p.m. – 3:10 p.m. 
Joseph A. Iaia, University of North Texas

Geometry of Fractal Squares
3:15 p.m. – 3:25 p.m.
Kristine Roinestad, Georgetown College


MAA Student Paper Sessions

Students who wish to present at the MAA Student Paper Sessions at MathFest 2013 in Hartford must be sponsored by a faculty advisor familiar with the work to be presented. Some funding to cover costs (up to $750) for student presenters is available. At most one student from each institution or REU can receive full funding; additional such students may be funded at a lower rate. All presenters are expected to take full part in the meeting and attend indicated activities sponsored for students on all three days of the conference. Abstracts and student travel grant applications should be submitted at www.maa.org/mathfest/abstracts. For additional information visit www.maa.org/students/undergrad.

Organizers:

Theron J. Hitchman, University of Northern Iowa
Jennifer Bergner, Salisbury University

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

Pi Mu Epsilon student speakers must be nominated by their chapter advisors. Application forms for PME student speakers will be available by March 1, 2013 on the PME web site www.pme-math.org. A PME student speaker who attends all the PME activities is eligible for transportation reimbursement up to $600, and additional speakers are eligible with a maximum $1200 reimbursement per chapter. PME speakers receive a free ticket to the PME Banquet with their conference registration fee. See the PME web site for more details.

Organizer:

Angela Spalsbury, Youngstown State University

Tags: 
Year: 
2013

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