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Minicourses

1. A Beginner's Guide to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Mathematics

Part A: Friday, August 8, 3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom I
Part B: Saturday, August 9, 3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom I

This course will introduce participants to the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) in mathematics and help them begin projects of their own.  We describe a taxonomy of SoTL questions, provide examples of SoTL projects in mathematics, and discuss methods for investigation. Participants will learn about collecting and analyzing different types of evidence, conducting literature searches, dealing with human subjects’ requirements, and selecting venues for presenting or publishing their work. With the presenters’ guidance, participants interactively select and transform a teaching problem of their own into a question for scholarly investigation and identify several types of evidence to gather.

Jacqueline M. Dewar, Loyola Marymount University
Curtis D. BennettLoyola Marymount University

2. Boolean Network Models:  A Non-Calculus Introduction to Mathematical Modeling for Biology

Part A: Thursday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom I
Part B: Friday, August 8, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom I

Participants will be introduced to the importance of Boolean network models in modern biology. They will learn how to build Boolean models and will work in small groups to experience how to use such models to describe, simulate, and control the dynamics of complex biological systems.  Participants will learn how to work with the web-based software systems DVD and ADAM for visualization and analysis of Boolean models and how to utilize the materials in courses that do not require Calculus.  We will conclude with a discussion on the advantages of Boolean models as tools for an early introduction to modeling.

Raina Robeva, Sweet Briar College
Robin DaviesSweet Briar College

3. Enhancing Conceptual Understanding of Multivariable Calculus Using CalcPlot3D for Visualization and Exploration

Part A: Thursday, August 7, 3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom I
Part B: Saturday, August 9, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom I

It is difficult for students to develop an accurate and intuitive understanding of the geometric relationships of calculus from static diagrams alone. This is especially true for the 3D concepts of multivariable calculus. In this course, we will explore ways to help students make these connections by visualizing multivariable calculus using CalcPlot3D, a versatile applet developed with NSF funding (NSF-DUE-0736968). Participants will learn how to customize this applet to create demonstrations and guided exploration activities for student use. Images created in this applet can be pasted into participants’ documents. See http://web.monroecc.edu/calcNSF/. Basic HTML experience is helpful. Bring a Java-enabled laptop.

Paul Seeburger, Monroe Community College

4. Instructional Supports for Implementing Inquiry-Oriented Curricula for Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, and Abstract Algebra

Part A: Friday, August 8, 3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III
Part B: Saturday, August 9, 3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III

This session is designed to support mathematicians interested in implementing an inquiry oriented curriculum. By inquiry-oriented we mean that the students are engaging in authentic mathematical inquiry and the teachers are actively involved in inquiring into students’ mathematical thinking. This mini-course will have two components. In the first component participants will engage with mathematical tasks from 3 different research-based inquiry oriented curricula that have been developed for Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, and Abstract Algebra. The goals of this component are to familiarize participants with the curricular tasks, the nature of the instruction, and common ways of student thinking. The second component will focus on high-leverage teaching practices that can be used in any inquiry-oriented setting. Examples of such practices include leading whole class discussions and launching instructional tasks. The goal of this component is to provide instructors with opportunities to develop some of the necessary teaching practices needed to implement inquiry-oriented curricula.

Estrella Johnson, Virginia Tech
Karen Keene,  North Carolina State University
Christine Andrews-Larson, Florida State University

5. Teaching Linear Algebra with GeoGebra: Making Connections between Algebra and Geometry

Part A: Thursday, August 7, 3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III
Part B: Saturday, August 9, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III

Participants will work with GeoGebra applets supporting instruction in elementary Linear Algebra. The workshop will consist of a) an overview of the topics and design, incorporating activities fostering connections between algebra and geometry; b) participant work with selected applets, including a very short introduction to GeoGebra; c) discussion of possible pedagogical approaches incorporating the applets; d) a look at some related application problems; e) summary of preliminary evaluation results; f) wrap-up, including remarks and suggestions by participants. Links to further freely available resources will be provided.

James D. FactorAlverno College
Susan F. Pustejovsky, Alverno College

6. SIMIODE – Teaching Differential Equations through Modeling and Technology

Part A: Thursday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III
Part B: Friday, August 8, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III

This minicourse will permit participants to experience SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations, an online community of teachers and learners of differential equations who use modeling and technology throughout the learning process. Participants will share several learning opportunities using SIMIODE materials; develop models from the student perspective; engage in collegial activities about uses of SIMIODE modeling scenarios; and initiate the creation of their own teaching scenario contributions to SIMIODE through partnering with other participants in and after the minicourse. The web home for SIMIODE is at www.simiode.org.

Brian Winkel, United States Military Academy

Year: 
2014

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