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Convergence Calendar

Please send Calendar items to Randy Schwartz.

An archive of past Calendar items is also available.

2016

January 6-9, 2016:  AMS-MAA Joint Mathematics Meetings, Seattle, WA

         The "largest mathematics conference in the world" will include, among others, the following presentations and sessions on the history of mathematics and its use in teaching:

  • AMS-MAA Special Session on The History of Mathematics, organized by Patti Hunter (Westmont College), Adrian Rice (Randolph-Macon College), Sloan Despeaux (Western Carolina Univ.), and Deborah Kent (Drake Univ.)
  • MAA Contributed Paper Session on The Contributions of Minorities to Mathematics Throughout History, organized by Amy Shell-Gellasch (Montgomery College) and Lloyd Douglas (Univ. of North Carolina)
  • MAA Contributed Paper Session on Incorporating the History of Mathematics into Developmental Math Courses, organized by Van Herd (Univ. of Texas-Austin) and Amy Shell-Gellasch (Montgomery College)
  • MAA General Contributed Paper Session on the History or Philosophy of Mathematics, organized by Jennifer Beineke (Western New England Univ.), Bem Cayco (San Jose State Univ.), Timothy Comar (Benedictine Univ.), and T. James Reid (Univ. of Mississippi)
  • AMS Special Session on Current Areas of Interest in the Mathematical Sciences of Medieval Islam, organized by Mohammad Azarian (Univ. of Evansville), Mohammad Javaheri (Siena College), and Emelie Kenney (Siena College)
  • additional talks and invited addresses on the use of primary sources in teaching discrete mathematics; on the history of the surreal numbers; on the antikythera mechanism; and on the mathematical work of opera singer Jerome Hines.


January 18 - July 29, 2016:  John Dee exhibit, London, England

          "Scholar, Courtier, Magician: The Lost Library of John Dee“ is an exhibition at the Royal College of Physicians (Regent’s Park, London) exploring one of Tudor England’s most extraordinary and enigmatic figures. Mathematician, magician, astronomer, astrologer, imperialist, alchemist and spy, John Dee (1527–1609) continues to fascinate and inspire centuries after he entered the court of Elizabeth I. This exhibit explores Dee through his personal library. On display for the first time are Dee’s mathematical, astronomical, and alchemical texts, many elaborately annotated and illustrated by Dee’s own hand. Now held in the collections of the Royal College of Physicians, they reveal tantalizing glimpses into the "conjuror’s mind“.


January 19, 2016:  Gresham College Lecture, London, England

          Gresham College Professor of Geometry Raymond Flood presents "Babbage and Lovelace" (part of the series “Great Mathematicians, Great Mathematics-- Part 2”) at 1 p.m. in the Museum of London, Room EC2. Arrive early to get a seat! The central figure of 19th-century computing was Charles Babbage (1791-1871), who may be said to have pioneered the modern computer age with his 'difference engines' and his 'analytical engine', although his influence on subsequent generations is hard to assess. Ada, Countess of Lovelace (1815-1852), daughter of Lord Byron and a close friend of Babbage, produced a perceptive commentary on the powers and potential of the analytical engine; this was essentially an introduction to what we now call programming.


January 21, 2016:  The Philadelphia Area Seminar on History of Mathematics (PASHoM), Villanova, PA

         To be held 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in Saint Augustine Center Room 300, Villanova Univ. Following conversation and a light supper (donation: $10.00), beginning at approx. 6:30 or 6:45 Chris Rorres (Drexel Univ.) will present a talk, “The Law of the Lever: Archimedes vs. Mach". Over a century ago Ernst Mach, the famous Austrian physicist and philosopher of science, wrote a blistering criticism of Archimedes' celebrated proof of the Law of the Lever. Mach accused Archimedes of overusing his “Grecian mania for demonstration" and succeeding in his proof only “by the help of the very proposition he sought to prove". His attack drew the expected objections from many historians and philosophers of science who, in turn, accused Mach of not understanding the subtleties of Archimedes’ proof. Dr. Rorres will give his own interpretation of this controversy from a mathematician’s point of view, concluding with his belief that, while Archimedes did indeed prove something, it can hardly be called a proof of the Law of the Lever.


January 29–30, 2016: ORESME Reading Group Winter Meeting, near Cincinnati, OH

          The Ohio River Early Sources in Mathematical Exposition (ORESME) Reading Group will hold its Winter Meeting at Northern Kentucky University. The focus will be on reading and discussing Emmy Noether’s Idealtheorie in Ringbereichen [Math. Ann. 83 (1921), 24-66], for which an English translation is available. Organizers Daniel J. Curtin (Northern Kentucky University) and Daniel E. Otero (Xavier University) welcome your inquiries for further details.


January 31, 2016:  Deadline for Association for Women in Mathematics Essay Contest

          The AWM Essay Contest: Biographies of Contemporary Women in Mathematics is open to students in three categories-- grades 6-8, grades 9-12, and college undergraduate-- with at least one winning submission chosen from each category.


February 16, 2016:  Gresham College Lecture, London, England

          Gresham College Professor of Geometry Raymond Flood presents "Gauss and Germain" (part of the series “Great Mathematicians, Great Mathematics-- Part 2”) at 1 p.m. in the Museum of London, Room EC2. Arrive early to get a seat! Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855) was one of the greatest mathematicians of all time. Possibly his most famous work was his book on number theory, published in 1801. After reading this book, the French mathematician Sophie Germain (1776-1831) began corresponding with Gauss about Fermat's last theorem, using a male pseudonym. Subsequently her interests moved to working on a general theory of vibrations of a curved surface which provided the basis for the modern theory of elasticity.


February 18, 2016:  The Philadelphia Area Seminar on History of Mathematics (PASHoM), Villanova, PA

         To be held 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in the Devon Room, on the second floor of the Connelly Center, Villanova Univ. Following conversation and a light supper (donation: $10.00), beginning at approx. 6:30 or 6:45 Lawrence D’Antonio (Ramapo College) will present a talk, “When Mathematicians were Rock Stars: the Academies of Science in the 18th Century". During the Enlightenment, the university was not the primary center of intellectual activity. Instead, the major institutions for mathematics and natural philosophy were the Academies of Science. The Paris, Berlin, St. Petersburg Academies of Science and the Royal Society of London sponsored research, gave academy members opportunities to present their research in oral and written form, and encouraged communication among the prominent scholars during the Enlightenment. The duty of the scientific academies was to drive out superstition and ignorance by establishing secure knowledge, of which mathematics is the most perfect model. Mathematicians played central roles.


February 27, 2016:  BSHM Research in Progress Meeting, Oxford, England

          Presenters at this annual meeting of the British Society for History of Mathematics (BSHM), to be held at Queen's College, Univ. of Oxford, will be research students in the history of mathematics and keynote speaker Dr. Stephen Johnston of the Museum for the History of Science, Univ. of Oxford.


February 29, 2016:  Gresham College Lecture, London, England

          Visiting Gresham Professor of Computing Mathematics Tony Mann presents "Calendar Curiosities for 29 February" at 6 p.m. in the Museum of London. Arrive early to get a seat! Did Archbishop Whitgift really die on 29th February 1603? Why are there more Friday 13th's now than in the Middle Ages? How did a famous composer (who died on Friday 13th) manage to write all his 39 operas before his 9th birthday? and how can we explain the mysterious date of the death of St. Teresa of Avila? Examples will cast light upon the quirks of our calendar, and you'll also learn a quick way to work out the day of the week of any given date.


March 9, 2016:  Celebrating the History of Women in Mathematics at Manchester, Manchester, England

          This event, scheduled at 4:30-6 p.m. in the Alan Turing Building, School of Mathematics, Manchester Univ., celebrates the lives of three female mathematicians: Phyllis Nicolson, Hanna Neumann, and Bertha Swirles. Presenters include Peter Neumann (Queen’s College, Univ. of Oxford) on the life and works of Hanna Neumann, and Ruth Williams (Univ. of Cambridge) on the life and works of Bertha Swirles. Organized in association with the British Society for the History of Mathematics (BSHM). To reserve a place at this event, e-mail Jenny Sloan.


March 15, 2016:  Gresham College Lecture, London, England

          Gresham College Professor of Geometry Raymond Flood presents "Hardy, Littlewood and Ramanujan" (part of the series “Great Mathematicians, Great Mathematics-- Part 2”) at 1 p.m. in the Museum of London, Room EC2. Arrive early to get a seat! The collaboration between G. H. Hardy (1877-1947) and J. E. Littlewood (1885-1977) was the most productive in mathematical history. Dominating the English mathematical scene for the first half of the 20th century, they obtained results of great influence, most notably in analysis and number theory. Into their world came the brilliant and intuitive mathematician, Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887-1920), who left India to work with Hardy until his untimely death at the age of 32.


March 23, 2016:  From Fibonacci to Da Vinci: The Italian Commercial Revolution, Derby, England

           A talk by Fenny Smith (Gresham College), scheduled for 7:30 – 8:30 pm in Lecture Theatre OL1 in the main building at Kedleston Road campus, Derby University. Jointly organized by the British Society for the History of Mathematics (BSHM) and the East Midlands Branch of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA). The two Leonardos mark the approximate bounds of a period of prolific commercial activity in southern Europe, particularly in Italy, during which our modern numerals became known and accepted into everyday use. This talk traces the journey of the new numerals from India through the Middle East and into Europe, and explores their reception here, and why merchants of the time found them so attractive that they were prepared to make the considerable effort required to learn how to use them.


April 13-16, 2016:  NCTM Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA

          The Annual Meeting and Exposition of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics always includes several presentations and workshops on incorporating mathematics history into elementary and secondary school classrooms.


April 19, 2016:  Gresham College Lecture, London, England

          Gresham College Professor of Geometry Raymond Flood presents "Turing and von Neumann" (part of the series “Great Mathematicians, Great Mathematics-- Part 2”) at 1 p.m. in the Museum of London, Room EC2. Arrive early to get a seat! Alan Turing (1912-1954) and John von Neumann (1903-1957) had an enormous range of interests not only in pure mathematics but also in practical applications. They made major contributions during the Second World War; Turing on cryptography and von Neumann on weapons development. The Turing machine formalized the idea of an algorithm and the Turing test is important in artificial intelligence while von Neumann founded the subject of game theory. Both are considered founders of computer science.


May 24, 2016:  Gresham College Lecture, London, England

          For the Annual Joint Lecture of the London Mathematical Society and Gresham College, Norman Biggs (London School of Economics and Political Science) presents "Mathematics, Measurement and Money" at 6 p.m. in the Museum of London. Arrive early to get a seat! Throughout its brief history, mathematics has been closely linked with measurement and money. In the ancient settlements the rules of arithmetic and geometry were used to solve problems about the allocation of food and resources. When life became more complex, the use of coined money led to computational problems that required good algorithms for their solution. Nowadays we rely on mathematics for security, and the links between information and money have become blurred. Can mathematics keep us safe?.


May 25-28, 2016:  12th Maghrebian Symposium on the History of Arabic Mathematics (COMHISMA12), Marrakech, Morocco

         This meeting, taking place at the Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS) Université Cadi Ayyad, aims to increase interest in the history of Arab mathematics as a fundamental phase in the general history of mathematics, and to provide Maghrebian researchers in this field an opportunity to collaborate with their foreign colleagues, in particular on:

  • the discovery, editing and translation of important manuscripts
  • the interaction between mathematics and the social, economic and cultural needs of society
  • identification of educational traditions of mathematics in the Arab-Islamic civilization
  • highlighting the links between mathematics and other fields of knowledge
  • highlighting the contributions of the Muslim West in constructing the edifice of mathematics.

         Talks are presented in one of the languages Arabic, French, or English. The application deadline is July 30, 2015.


May 28-30, 2016:  CSHPS/SCHPS Annual Meeting, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

          The Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science  / La Société Canadienne d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences (CSHPS/SCHPS) is scheduled at the University of Calgary, in conjunction with the 2016 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. Abstract deadline is January 15, 2016.


May 29-31, 2016:  CSHPM/SCHPM Annual Meeting, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

          The Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Mathematics / La Société Canadienne d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Mathématiques (CSHPM/SCHPM) is scheduled at the University of Calgary, in conjunction with the 2016 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The Special Session topic for the meeting will be "Mathematics and Logic in the 19th and 20th Centuries." The Kenneth May Lecturer will be Dr. Jamie Tappenden (Department of Philosophy, University of Michigan). Abstract deadline is February 1, 2016.


June 9-10, 2016:  From Sea to Sky: the Evolution of Air Navigation from the Ocean and Beyond, Greenwich, England

          This conference at the National Maritime Museum is organized jointly by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the Royal Institute of Navigation. Abstract deadline is November 6, 2015.


June 22-25, 2016:  Eighth Quadrennial Joint Meeting of the BSHS, CSHPS, and HSS, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

          The eighth joint meeting of the British Society for the History of Science, the Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science, and the History of Science Society will take place at the University of Alberta. The program will include themed sessions, plenary lectures, and panels. A typical presentation will be 20 minutes plus 10 minutes for questions, but special sessions such as round tables and panels will be accommodated. The deadline for submitting a session or paper proposal is December 4, 2015.


July 7-16, 2016:  Leibniz Tercentenary Summer School, Leipzig and Hannover, Germany

         This summer school is for those at the master's, doctoral, or post-doctoral levels who are researching works of G. W. Leibniz. Organized in two successive sessions, one in each city, by the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences in Leipzig, the Leibniz Endowed Professorship at the University of Hanover, and the International Leibniz Congress (see July 18-23, below). Applications for lodging, food, and some travel expenses are due by January 1, 2016.


July 18-22, 2016:  History and Pedagogy of Mathematics Satellite Conference of ICME, Montpellier, France

          The International Study Group for History and Pedagogy of Mathematics quadrennial Satellite Conference (HPM 2016) of the International Conference on Mathematical Education (ICME-13) is scheduled at the Institut de Recherche sur l'Enseignement des Mathematiques (IREM), Universite Montpellier 2, France. The HPM 2016 theme is “Mathematics in the Mediterranean.” The program includes plenary lectures, panels, discussion groups, workshops, sessions for research reports, a poster session, and exhibitions of books and other didactical material.


July 18-22, 2016:  Seventh quadrennial European Congress of Mathematics, Berlin, Germany

          This quadrennial Congress of the European Mathematical Society is scheduled at the Technischen Universität (TU) and includes several activities related to the history of mathematics:

  • A dedicated History Session organized by Martin Grötschel (President of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences), with lectures by Eberhard Knobloch (TU Berlin) on Leibniz, Gerhard Wanner (Univ. of Geneva) on Lagrange, Günter M. Ziegler (Free Univ. of Berlin) on Euler, and Jürgen Sprekels (Humboldt-Univ. of Berlin) on Karl Weierstraß.
  • Plenary speakers include Karine Chemla (CNRS Université Paris Diderot), who is Principal Investigator of Project SAW (Mathematical Sciences in the Ancient World)
  • Award of the Otto Neugebauer Prize to an historian of mathematics for "highly original and influential work in the field of history of mathematics"
  • In conjunction with the Congress, a book will be published, Mathematical Berlin by Iris and Martin Grötschel (all participants will obtain a hard copy as a gift), which is a guidebook to places, institutions, and persons of historical mathematical interest in the center of Berlin.


July 18-23, 2016:  Tenth Quinquennial International Leibniz Congress, Hannover, Germany

         This conference is scheduled at the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University.


July 24-31, 2016:  13th quadrennial International Congress on Mathematical Education, Hamburg, Germany

         ICME-13 will be held at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Proposals for papers must be submitted via the ICME-13 website between Sep. 1 and Oct. 1, 2015.

          A special feature of ICME-13 is a Thematic Afternoon in which the following three strands will take place in parallel:

  • "European Didactic Traditions"
  • "German-Speaking Traditions in Mathematics Education Research"
  • "The Legacy of Felix Klein".

          Among the Invited Lectures related to mathematics history:

  • "Intersections of Culture, Language, and Mathematics Education: Looking Back and Looking Ahead" (Marta Civil, Univ. of Arizona)
  • "Learning Modern Algebra from Early Attempts to Prove Fermat’s Last Theorem: A Course for Prospective Teachers" (Al Cuoco, Education Development Center)
  • "In Memoriam Paulus Gerdus" (Ubiratan D’Ambrosio, State Univ. of Campinas, Brazil)
  • "History of Mathematics in Mathematics Education: Can We Restore Mathematics as a Liberal Art?" (Michael Fried, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Israel)
  • "Equity in Ethnomathematics: Connecting Research, Pedagogy, and Promising Practices" (Linda Furuto, Univ. of Hawai’i at Mānoa).

          Among the Topic Study Groups related to mathematics history:

  • TSG 24, "The History of the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics"
  • TSG 25, "The Role of History of Mathematics in Mathematics Education"
  • TSG 35, "The Role of Ethnomathematics in Mathematics Education".


August 3-6, 2016:  MAA MathFest, Columbus, OH


August 21-24, 2015:   BSHM/LMFK Conference on the Use of History of Mathematics in Teaching , Bath, UK

          This conference at Bath Spa University is organized jointly by the British Society for the History of Mathematics (BSHM) and the Danish Association for Mathematics Teachers (LMFK). It provides an opportunity for secondary school teachers and mathematics educators in Denmark and the United Kingdom to develop ideas about cases and share best practice in using the history of mathematics. The ambition is to build collaborations and forums for exchange of experiences and materials for mutual benefit.


November 3-6, 2016:  History of Science Society Annual Meeting, Atlanta,GA


November 17-20, 2016:  AMATYC Annual Conference, Denver, CO

 

2017

January 4-7, 2017:  AMS-MAA Joint Mathematics Meetings, Atlanta, GA


July 26-29, 2017:  MAA MathFest, Chicago, IL


Summer 2017:  25th quadrennial International Congress of History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


November 9-12, 2017:  History of Science Society Annual Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, Canada


November 9-12, 2017:  AMATYC Annual Conference, San Diego, CA

 

2018

January 10-13, 2018:  AMS-MAA Joint Mathematics Meetings, San Diego, CA


August 1-4, 2018:  MAA MathFest, Denver, CO


November 1-4, 2018:  History of Science Society Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA


November 15-18, 2018:  AMATYC Annual Conference, Orlando, FL

 

2019

January 16-19, 2019:  AMS-MAA Joint Mathematics Meetings, Baltimore, MD


July 31 - August 3, 2019:  MAA MathFest, Cincinnati, OH

 

2020

January 15-18, 2020:  AMS-MAA Joint Mathematics Meetings, Denver, CO

 

2021

January 6-9, 2021:  AMS-MAA Joint Mathematics Meetings, Washington, DC

 

Please send Calendar items to Randy Schwartz.

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