You are here

Mathematical Problems from Applied Logic I: Logics for the XXIst Century

Dov M. Gabbay, Sergei S. Goncharov, and Michael Zakharyaschev, editors
Publisher: 
Springer Verlag
Publication Date: 
2006
Number of Pages: 
348
Format: 
Hardcover
Series: 
International Mathematics Series 4
Price: 
159.00
ISBN: 
0-387-28688-8
Category: 
Anthology
We do not plan to review this book.

Franz Baader and Ralf K¨usters

Nonstandard Inferences in Description Logics:

The Story So Far . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

2. Description Logics and Standard Inferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

3. Nonstandard Inferences—Motivation and Definitions . . . . . . . . 11

3.1. Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

3.2. Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

3.3. Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

4. A Structural Characterization of Subsumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

4.1. Getting started — The characterization for EL . . . . . . . . . . 24

4.2. Extending the characterization to ALE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

4.3. Characterization of subsumption for other DLs . . . . . . . . . . 31

5. The Least Common Subsumer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

5.1. The LCS for EL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

5.2. The LCS for ALE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

5.3. The LCS for other DLs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

6. The Most Specific Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

6.1. Existence and approximation of the MSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

6.2. The most specific concept in the presence of cyclic

TBoxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

7. Rewriting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

7.1. The minimal rewriting decision problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45

7.2. The minimal rewriting computation problem . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

xxiv Content

7.3. Approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52

8. Matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

8.1. Deciding matching problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

8.2. Solutions of matching problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

8.3. Computing matchers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

8.4. Matching in other DLs and extensions of matching . . . . . . 64

9. Conclusion and Future Perspectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

10. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Lev Beklemishev and Albert Visser

Problems in the Logic of Provability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

2. Informal Concepts of Proof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81

2.1. Formal and informal provability and

the problem of equivalence of proofs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

2.2. Strengthening Hilbert’s thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

2.3. Coordinate-free proof theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

3. Basics of Provability Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

4.Provability Logic for Intuitionistic Arithmetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

4.1. Propositional logics of arithmetical theories . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

4.2. Admissible rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

4.3. The provability logic of HA and related theories . . . . . . . . 100

5. Provability Logic and Bounded Arithmetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

6. Classification of Bimodal Provability Logics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

7. Magari Algebras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

8. Interpretability Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

9. Graded Provability Algebras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

10. List of Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

Johan van Benthem

Open Problems in Logical Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137

Content xxv

1. Logical Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

2. Standard Epistemic Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

2.1. Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

2.2. Semantics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141

2.3. Basic model theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

2.4. Axiomatics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

2.5. Complexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

2.6. Open problems, even here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144

3. Public Announcement: Epistemic Logic Dynamified . . . . . . . . 144

3.1. World elimination: the system PAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145

3.2. What are the real update laws? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150

3.3. Model theory of learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153

3.4. Communication and planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155

3.5. Group knowledge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156

4. Dynamic Epistemic Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157

4.1. Information from arbitrary events: product update . . . . .158

4.2. Update evolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160

4.3. Questions of language design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162

4.4. Extensions of empirical coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163

5. Background in Standard Logics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164

5.1. Modal logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165

5.2. First-order logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166

5.3. Fixed-point logics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168

6. From Information Update to Belief Revision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

6.1. From knowledge to belief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170

6.2. Dynamic doxastic logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171

6.3. Better-known theories of belief revision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175

6.4. Probabilistic update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177

7. Temporal Epistemic logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178

7.1. Broader temporal perspectives on update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178

7.2. Knowledge and ignorance over time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179

7.3. Representation of update logics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181

7.4. Connections with other parts of mathematics . . . . . . . . . . 183

8. Game Logics and Game Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184

9. Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185

References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186

xxvi Content

S Barry Cooper

Computability and Emergence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193

1. An Emergent World around Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194

2. Descriptions, Algorithms, and the Breakdown

of Inductive Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195

3. Ontology and Mathematical Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202

4. Where does It All Start? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204

5. Towards a Model Based on Algorithmic Content . . . . . . . . . . . 209

6. Levels of Reality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214

7. Algorithmic Content Revisited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221

8. What Is to Be Done? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224

References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228

John N Crossley

Samsara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233

1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234

1.1. The structure of the paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234

2. An Example of a Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235

3. What Logics Do We Need? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236

3.1. Extracting constructions from proofs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242

3.2. The Lambda Calculus and the Curry–Howard

correspondence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243

3.3. Proofs as types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245

3.4. Strong normalization and program extraction . . . . . . . . . . 248

3.5. Beyond traditional logic in program extraction . . . . . . . . . 250

3.6. Proofs from programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .256

3.7. Programs then proofs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257

4. What are Logical Systems and What Should They Be? . . . . .258

4.1. Higher order logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .259

4.2. A note on set theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261

4.3. Computation and proof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262

The endless cycle of death and rebirth to which life in the material world is

bound. (OED)

Content xxvii

5. The Nature of Proof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262

5.1. The question of scale and the role of technology . . . . . . . . 263

5.2. Foundations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268

6. Final Remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269

References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270

Wilfrid Hodges

Two Doors to Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277

1. Logic and Cognitive Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279

1.1. Spatial intuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281

1.2. Kurt G¨odel and the choice of representation . . . . . . . . . . . .285

1.3. A sample cognitive description of reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . 293

1.4. Frege versus Peirce: comparison of representations . . . . . 298

2. Medieval Arabic Semantics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300

References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313

Lawrence S Moss

Applied Logic: A Manifesto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317

1. What is Applied Logic? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .317

2. Mathematics and Logic, but Different from

Mathematical Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319

2.1. Mathematical Logic and Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .320

2.2. Where applied logic differs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322

2.3. Applied mathematics is good mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324

2.4. Applied logic is applied mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325

3. Applied Philosophical Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .326

3.1. Applied philosophical logic = theoretical AI . . . . . . . . . . . .328

4. What Does Computer Science Have to Do with It? . . . . . . . . .328

4.1. Logic is the calculus of computer science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329

4.2. Computer science motivates logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330

4.3. Going beyond the traditional boundaries of logic . . . . . . . 331

5. Other Case Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332

5.1. Neural networks and non-monotonic logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332

xxviii Content

5.2. Dynamic epistemic logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333

5.3. Linguistics, logic, and mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .335

5.4. But is it dead? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339

6. Being as catholic as Possible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341

References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345

Dummy View - NOT TO BE DELETED