You are here

The Fourfold Way in Real Analysis: An Alternative to the Metaplectic Representation

Publisher: 
Birkhäuser
Number of Pages: 
220
Price: 
109.00
ISBN: 
3764375442
Date Received: 
Wednesday, May 10, 2006
Reviewable: 
No
Include In BLL Rating: 
No
Reviewer Email Address: 
André Unterberger
Series: 
Progress in Mathematics 250
Publication Date: 
2006
Format: 
Hardcover
Category: 
Monograph

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii

Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii

Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv

Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv

Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv

Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv

About the Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi

Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii

Number sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii

Classicalmatrix groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii

Vector calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii

Function spaces and multi-index notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix

Combinatorial notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx

Part I: Symplectic Geometry

1 Symplectic Spaces and Lagrangian Planes

1.1 Symplectic Vector Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

1.1.1 Generalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

1.1.2 Symplectic bases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

1.1.3 Differential interpretation of σ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

1.2 Skew-Orthogonality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

1.2.1 Isotropic and Lagrangian subspaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

1.2.2 The symplectic Gram–Schmidt theorem . . . . . . . . . . . 12

1.3 The Lagrangian Grassmannian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

1.3.1 Lagrangian planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

1.3.2 The action of Sp(n) on Lag(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

viii Contents

1.4 The Signature of a Triple of Lagrangian Planes . . . . . . . . . . . 19

1.4.1 First properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

1.4.2 The cocycle property of τ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

1.4.3 Topological properties of τ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

2 The Symplectic Group

2.1 The Standard Symplectic Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

2.1.1 Symplectic matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

2.1.2 The unitary group U(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

2.1.3 The symplectic algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

2.2 Factorization Results in Sp(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

2.2.1 Polar and Cartan decomposition in Sp(n) . . . . . . . . . . 38

2.2.2 The “pre-Iwasawa” factorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

2.2.3 Free symplectic matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

2.3 HamiltonianMechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

2.3.1 Hamiltonian flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

2.3.2 The variational equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

2.3.3 The group Ham(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

2.3.4 Hamiltonian periodic orbits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

3 Multi-Oriented Symplectic Geometry

3.1 Souriau Mapping and Maslov Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

3.1.1 The Souriaumapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

3.1.2 Definition of the Maslov index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

3.1.3 Properties of theMaslov index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

3.1.4 The Maslov index on Sp(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

3.2 The Arnol’d–Leray–Maslov Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

3.2.1 The problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

3.2.2 The Maslov bundle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

3.2.3 Explicit construction of the ALM index . . . . . . . . . . . 80

3.3 q-Symplectic Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

3.3.1 The identification Lag

(n) = Lag(n) × Z . . . . . . . . . . 85

3.3.2 The universal covering Sp

(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

3.3.3 The action of Spq(n) on Lag2q(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

4 Intersection Indices in Lag(n) and Sp(n)

4.1 Lagrangian Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

4.1.1 The strata of Lag(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

4.1.2 The Lagrangian intersection index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

4.1.3 Explicit construction of a Lagrangian intersection index . . 98

4.2 Symplectic Intersection Indices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

Contents ix

4.2.1 The strata of Sp(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

4.2.2 Construction of a symplectic intersection index . . . . . . . 101

4.2.3 Example: spectral flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

4.3 The Conley–Zehnder Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

4.3.1 Definition of the Conley–Zehnder index . . . . . . . . . . . 104

4.3.2 The symplectic Cayley transform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

4.3.3 Definition and properties of ν(S) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

4.3.4 Relation between ν and μP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Part II: Heisenberg Group, Weyl Calculus, and

Metaplectic Representation

5 Lagrangian Manifolds and Quantization

5.1 Lagrangian Manifolds and Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

5.1.1 Definition and examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

5.1.2 The phase of a Lagrangian manifold . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

5.1.3 The local expression of a phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

5.2 HamiltonianMotions and Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130

5.2.1 The Poincar´e–Cartan Invariant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130

5.2.2 Hamilton–Jacobi theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

5.2.3 The Hamiltonian phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

5.3 Integrable Systems and Lagrangian Tori . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

5.3.1 Poisson brackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

5.3.2 Angle-action variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

5.3.3 Lagrangian tori . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

5.4 Quantization of Lagrangian Manifolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

5.4.1 The Keller–Maslov quantization conditions . . . . . . . . . 145

5.4.2 The case of q-oriented Lagrangian manifolds . . . . . . . . . 147

5.4.3 Waveforms on a Lagrangian Manifold . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

5.5 Heisenberg–Weyl and Grossmann–Royer Operators . . . . . . . . . 152

5.5.1 Definition of the Heisenberg–Weyl operators . . . . . . . . . 152

5.5.2 First properties of the operators T(z) . . . . . . . . . . . . 154

5.5.3 The Grossmann–Royer operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156

6 Heisenberg Group and Weyl Operators

6.1 Heisenberg Group and Schr¨odinger Representation . . . . . . . . . 160

6.1.1 The Heisenberg algebra and group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160

6.1.2 The Schr¨odinger representation of Hn . . . . . . . . . . . . 163

6.2 Weyl Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166

6.2.1 Basic definitions and properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167

x Contents

6.2.2 Relation with ordinary pseudo-differential calculus . . . . . 170

6.3 Continuity and Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174

6.3.1 Continuity properties of Weyl operators . . . . . . . . . . . 174

6.3.2 Composition of Weyl operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179

6.3.3 Quantization versus dequantization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

6.4 The Wigner–Moyal Transform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185

6.4.1 Definition and first properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186

6.4.2 Wigner transform and probability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189

6.4.3 On the range of the Wigner transform . . . . . . . . . . . . 192

7 The Metaplectic Group

7.1 Definition and Properties of Mp(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196

7.1.1 Quadratic Fourier transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196

7.1.2 The projection πMp : Mp(n) −→ Sp(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . 199

7.1.3 Metaplectic covariance of Weyl calculus . . . . . . . . . . . 204

7.2 TheMetaplectic Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208

7.2.1 Quadratic Hamiltonians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208

7.2.2 The Schr¨odinger equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209

7.2.3 The action of Mp(n) on Gaussians: dynamical approach . . 212

7.3 Maslov Indices on Mp(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214

7.3.1 The Maslov index μ( S) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215

7.3.2 The Maslov indices μ( S) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220

7.4 The Weyl Symbol of a Metaplectic Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . 222

7.4.1 The operators Rν(S) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223

7.4.2 Relation with the Conley–Zehnder index . . . . . . . . . . . 227

Part III: Quantum Mechanics in Phase Space

8 The Uncertainty Principle

8.1 States and Observables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238

8.1.1 Classicalmechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238

8.1.2 Quantummechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239

8.2 The Quantum Mechanical Covariance Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . 239

8.2.1 Covariance matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240

8.2.2 The uncertainty principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240

8.3 Symplectic Spectrum and Williamson’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . . 244

8.3.1 Williamson normal form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244

8.3.2 The symplectic spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246

8.3.3 The notion of symplectic capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248

Contents xi

8.3.4 Admissible covariance matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252

8.4 Wigner Ellipsoids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253

8.4.1 Phase space ellipsoids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253

8.4.2 Wigner ellipsoids and quantum blobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255

8.4.3 Wigner ellipsoids of subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258

8.4.4 Uncertainty and symplectic capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261

8.5 Gaussian States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262

8.5.1 The Wigner transform of a Gaussian . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263

8.5.2 Gaussians and quantum blobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265

8.5.3 Averaging over quantum blobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266

9 The Density Operator

9.1 Trace-Class and Hilbert–Schmidt Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272

9.1.1 Trace-class operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272

9.1.2 Hilbert–Schmidt operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279

9.2 IntegralOperators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282

9.2.1 Operators with L2 kernels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282

9.2.2 Integral trace-class operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285

9.2.3 Integral Hilbert–Schmidt operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288

9.3 The Density Operator of a QuantumState . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291

9.3.1 Pure and mixed quantum states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291

9.3.2 Time-evolution of the density operator . . . . . . . . . . . . 296

9.3.3 Gaussian mixed states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298

10 A Phase Space Weyl Calculus

10.1 Introduction and Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304

10.1.1 Discussion of Schr¨odinger’s argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304

10.1.2 The Heisenberg group revisited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307

10.1.3 The Stone–von Neumann theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309

10.2 TheWignerWave-PacketTransform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310

10.2.1 Definition of Uφ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310

10.2.2 The range of Uφ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314

10.3 Phase-SpaceWeyl Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317

10.3.1 Useful intertwining formulae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317

10.3.2 Properties of phase-space Weyl operators . . . . . . . . . . 319

10.3.3 Metaplectic covariance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321

10.4 Schr¨odinger Equation in Phase Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324

10.4.1 Derivation of the equation (10.39) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324

10.4.2 The case of quadratic Hamiltonians . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325

10.4.3 Probabilistic interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327

10.5 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331

xii Contents

A Classical Lie Groups

A.1 General Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333

A.2 The Baker–Campbell–HausdorffFormula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335

A.3 One-parameter Subgroups of GL(m,R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335

B Covering Spaces and Groups

C Pseudo-Differential Operators

C.1 The Classes Sm

ρ,δ, Lm

ρ,δ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342

C.2 Composition and Adjoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342

D Basics of Probability Theory

D.1 Elementary Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345

D.2 Gaussian Densities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347

Solutions to Selected Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349

Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365

Publish Book: 
Modify Date: 
Friday, February 23, 2007

Dummy View - NOT TO BE DELETED