You are here

Loci Browse Articles

Displaying 41 - 50 of 323

This is a student module for the article, which presents a fresh look at an age-old calculus optimization problem, the 'box problem.'

This article presents a fresh look at an age-old calculus optimization problem, the 'box problem.' (Also includes a Student Module condensed from the article.)

This suite of five interactive applets (written with GeoGebra) allows exploration of definitions and theorems commonly presented in first-year analysis courses. Topics include sequence convergence, continuity at a point, the Mean Value theorem, Taylor series, and Riemann sums. Included with each applet is a pair of activities: one for becoming comfortable using the applet, and one for using the applet to explore the associated topic in depth.
We highlight five pages written in XHTML with links to SVG files that produce animations illustrating calculus concepts such as the sign of the derivative, inflection points, conic sections, area between two curves, and multivariable functions.
This site features three simple-to-use applets: contour diagrams, curve families, and surface of revolution. The applets are written in Java and exploit Sun Microsystems' Java OpenGL technology so they will run on Apple OS X, Microsoft Windows 2000 or above, Solaris and many common configurations of Linux.
Simple probability concepts such as sampling with or without replacement are illustrated in this engaging tiered activity for beginning students and future teachers of probability.

This interactive Geogebra applet allows students to experiment with 2 by 2 matrices and the corresponding geometric transformations of the real plane. A list of student activities is provided.

This interactive Geogebra applet allows exploration of a linear transformation in terms of images of a set of points. The Geogebra interface allows dragging of points and vectors to make for versatile explorations of basic linear algebra ideas. Suggested activities are included.

Three applets allow you to interact with the puzzle described in the April 2009 Mathematics Magazine article by Alex Fink and Richard Guy.
In this article, a very simple model is used to describe and generate many types of seashell shapes.

Pages

Dummy View - NOT TO BE DELETED