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A (38) B (43) C (35) D (64) E (52) F (14) G (42) H (79) I (3) J (22) K (29) L (47) M (29) N (18) O (4) P (89) Q (1) R (36) S (40) T (16) U (1) V (8) W (63) Y (1) Z (1)
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
It is nothing short of a miracle that modern methods of instruction have not yet entirely strangled the holy curiousity of inquiry.
In H. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1988.
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
The world needs heroes and it's better they be harmless men like me than villains like Hitler.
In H. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1988.
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
A human being is a part of the whole, called by us "Universe," a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely, but the striving for such achievement is in itself a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.
In H. Eves, Mathematical Circles Adieu, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1977.
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
These thoughts did not come in any verbal formulation. I rarely think in words at all. A thought comes, and I may try to express it in words afterward.
In H. Eves Mathematical Circles Adieu, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1977.
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
Do not worry about your difficulties in mathematics, I assure you that mine are greater.
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
The truth of a theory is in your mind, not in your eyes.
In H. Eves Mathematical Circles Squared, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1972.
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
Since the mathematicians have invaded the theory of relativity, I do not understand it myself anymore.
In A. Sommerfelt "To Albert Einstein's Seventieth Birthday" in Paul A. Schilpp (ed.) Albert Einstein, Philosopher-Scientist, Evanston, 1949.
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
The human mind has first to construct forms, independently, before we can find them in things.
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
Nature hides her secrets because of her essential loftiness, but not by means of ruse.
Einstein, Albert (1879-1955)
Raffiniert ist der Herr Gott, aber boshaft ist er nicht. God is subtle, but he is not malicious.
Inscribed in Fine Hall, Princeton University.

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