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Fisher, Irving
The effort of the economist is to "see," to picture the interplay of economic elements. The more clearly cut these elements appear in his vision, the better; the more elements he can grasp and hold in his mind at once, the better. The economic world is a misty region. The first explorers used unaided vision. Mathematics is the lantern by which what before was dimly visible now looms up in firm, bold outlines. The old phantasmagoria disappear. We see better. We also see further.
Transactions of Conn. Academy, 1892.
Finkel, Benjamin Franklin
The solution of problems is one of the lowest forms of mathematical research, ... yet its educational value cannot be overestimated. It is the ladder by which the mind ascends into higher fields of original research and investigation. Many dormant minds have been aroused into activity through the mastery of a single problem.
The American Mathematical Monthly, No. 1.
Feynman, Richard Philips (1918 - 1988)
We have a habit in writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover up all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or describe how you had the wrong idea first, and so on. So there isn't any place to publish, in a dignified manner, what you actually did in order to get to do the work.
Nobel Lecture, 1966.
Freeman Dyson
The difference between a text without problems and a text with problems is like the difference between learning to read a language and learning to speak it.
Disturbing the Universe

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