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A (38) B (43) C (35) D (64) E (52) F (14) G (42) H (79) I (3) J (22) K (29) L (47) M (29) N (18) O (4) P (89) Q (1) R (36) S (40) T (16) U (1) V (8) W (63) Y (1) Z (1)
Jowett, Benjamin (1817 - 1893)
Logic is neither a science or an art, but a dodge.
In J. R. Newman (ed.), The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.
Johnson, Samuel (1709-1784)
Sir, I have found you an argument. I am not obliged to find you an understanding.
J. Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, 1784.
Jevons, William Stanley
It is clear that Economics, if it is to be a science at all, must be a mathematical science.
Theory of Political Economy.
Jefferson, Thomas
[T]he science of calculation also is indispensable as far as the extraction of the square and cube roots: Algebra as far as the quadratic equation and the use of logarithms are often of value in ordinary cases: but all beyond these is but a luxury; a delicious luxury indeed; but not to be in indulged in by one who is to have a profession to follow for his subsistence.
J. Robert Oppenheimer, "The Encouragement of Science," in I. Gordon and S. Sorkin (eds.), The Armchair Science Reader, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1959.
Jeans, Sir James
From the intrinsic evidence of his creation, the Great Architect of the Universe now begins to appear as a pure mathematician.
Mysterious Universe.
James, William (1842 - 1910)
The union of the mathematician with the poet, fervor with measure, passion with correctness, this surely is the ideal.
Collected Essays.
Jeans, Sir James
The essential fact is that all the pictures which science now draws of nature, and which alone seem capable of according with observational facts, are mathematical pictures.
In J. R. Newman (ed.), The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.
Jacobi, Carl
Mathematics is the science of what is clear by itself.
In J. R. Newman (ed.), The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.
Jacobi, Carl
It is often more convenient to possess the ashes of great men than to possess the men themselves during their lifetime.
[Commenting on the return of Descartes' remains to France]
In H. Eves, Mathematical Circles Adieu, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1977.
Jacobi, Carl
The real end of science is the honor of the human mind.
In H. Eves, In Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1969.

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