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A (38) B (43) C (35) D (64) E (52) F (14) G (42) H (79) I (3) J (22) K (29) L (47) M (29) N (18) O (4) P (89) Q (1) R (36) S (40) T (16) U (1) V (8) W (63) Y (1) Z (1)
Kronecker, Leopold (1823 - 1891)
God made the integers, all else is the work of man.
Jahresberichte der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung.
Kronecker, Leopold (1823-1891)
Number theorists are like lotus-eaters -- having once tasted of this food they can never give it up.
In H. Eves, Mathematical Circles Squared, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1972.
Kraft, Prinz zu Hohlenlohe-Ingelfingen (1827 - 1892)
Mathematics is indeed dangerous in that it absorbs students to such a degree that it dulls their senses to everything else.
Attributed by Karl Schellbach. In H. Eves, Mathematical Circles Adieu, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1977.
Kovalevsky, Sonja
Say what you know, do what you must, come what may.
[Motto on her paper "On the Problem of the Rotation of a Solid Body about a Fixed Point"]
Koestler, Arthur (1905- )
Nobody before the Pythagoreans had thought that mathematical relations held the secret of the universe. Twenty-five centuries later, Europe is still blessed and cursed with their heritage. To non-European civilizations, the idea that numbers are the key to both wisdom and power, seems never to have occurred.
The Sleepwalkers, 1959.
Koestler, Arthur (1905- )
In the index to the six hundred odd pages of Arnold Toynbee's A Study of History, abridged version, the names of Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes and Newton do not occur yet their cosmic quest destroyed the medieval vision of an immutable social order in a walled-in universe and transformed the European landscape, society, culture, habits and general outlook, as thoroughly as if a new species had arisen on this planet.
In G. Simmons, Calculus Gems, New York: McGraw Hill Inc., 1992.
Kline, Morris
Logic is the art of going wrong with confidence.
In N. Rose, Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh, NC: Rome Press Inc., 1988.
Kline, Morris
A proof tells us where to concentrate our doubts.
In N. Rose, Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh, NC: Rome Press Inc., 1988.
Kline, Morris
Statistics: the mathematical theory of ignorance.
In N. Rose, Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh, NC: Rome Press Inc., 1988.
Kleinhenz, Robert J.
When asked what it was like to set about proving something, the mathematician likened proving a theorem to seeing the peak of a mountain and trying to climb to the top. One establishes a base camp and begins scaling the mountain's sheer face, encountering obstacles at every turn, often retracing one's steps and struggling every foot of the journey. Finally when the top is reached, one stands examining the peak, taking in the view of the surrounding countryside and then noting the automobile road up the other side!
Source unknown

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