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Nightingale, Florence (1820-1910)
[Of her:]
Her statistics were more than a study, they were indeed her religion. For her Quetelet was the hero as scientist, and the presentation copy of his Physique sociale is annotated by her on every page. Florence Nightingale believed -- and in all the actions of her life acted upon that belief -- that the administrator could only be successful if he were guided by statistical knowledge. The legislator -- to say nothing of the politician -- too often failed for want of this knowledge. Nay, she went further; she held that the universe -- including human communities -- was evolving in accordance with a divine plan; that it was man's business to endeavor to understand this plan and guide his actions in sympathy with it. But to understand God's thoughts, she held we must study statistics, for these are the measure of His purpose. Thus the study of statistics was for her a religious duty.
K. Pearson, The Life, Letters and Labours for Francis Galton, vol. 2, 1924.
Newton, Isaac (1642-1727)
[His epitaph:]
Who, by vigor of mind almost divine, the motions and figures of the planets, the paths of comets, and the tides of the seas first demonstrated.
unknown
Newton, Isaac (1642-1727)
The latest authors, like the most ancient, strove to subordinate the phenomena of nature to the laws of mathematics.
Newton, Isaac (1642-1727)
The description of right lines and circles, upon which geometry is founded, belongs to mechanics. Geometry does not teach us to draw these lines, but requires them to be drawn.
Principia Mathematica.
Newton, Isaac (1642-1727)
Hypotheses non fingo.
I feign no hypotheses.
Principia Mathematica.
Newton, Isaac (1642-1727)
To explain all nature is too difficult a task for any one man or even for any one age. 'Tis much better to do a little with certainty, and leave the rest for others that come after you, than to explain all things.
In G. Simmons, Calculus Gems, New York: McGraw Hill Inc., 1992.
Newton, Isaac (1642-1727)
[F]rom the same principles, I now demonstrate the frame of the System of the World.
Principia Mathematica
Newman, James R.
Games are among the most interesting creations of the human mind, and the analysis of their structure is full of adventure and surprises. Unfortunately there is never a lack of mathematicians for the job of transforming delectable ingredients into a dish that tastes like a damp blanket.
In J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.
Newman, James R.
The Theory of Groups is a branch of mathematics in which one does something to something and then compares the result with the result obtained from doing the same thing to something else, or something else to the same thing.
In J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.
Newman, James R.
To be sure, mathematics can be extended to any branch of knowledge, including economics, provided the concepts are so clearly defined as to permit accurate symbolic representation. That is only another way of saying that in some branches of discourse it is desirable to know what you are talking about.
In J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.

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