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A (38) B (43) C (35) D (64) E (52) F (14) G (42) H (79) I (3) J (22) K (29) L (47) M (29) N (18) O (4) P (89) Q (1) R (36) S (40) T (16) U (1) V (8) W (63) Y (1) Z (1)
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
[I feel] engulfed in the infinite immensity of spaces whereof I know nothing, and which know nothing of me. I am terrified. The eternal silence of these infinite spaces alarms me.
Pensees. 1670.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
The last thing one knows when writing a book is what to put first.
Pensees. 1670.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
What is man in nature? Nothing in relation to the infinite, all in relation to nothing, a mean between nothing and everything.
Pensees. 1670.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
Reverend Fathers, my letters did not usually follow each other at such close intervals, nor were they so long .... This one would not be so long had I but the leisure to make it shorter.
Lettres provinciales.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
Reason is the slow and tortuous method by which these who do not know the truth discover it. The heart has its own reason which reason does not know.
Pensees. 1670.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
The excitement that a gambler feels when making a bet is equal to the amount he might win times the probability of winning it.
In N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC:Rome Press Inc., 1988.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
Let no one say that I have said nothing new... the arrangement of the subject is new. When we play tennis, we both play with the same ball, but one of us places it better.
Pensees. 1670.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
Reason's last step is the recognition that there are an infinite number of things which are beyond it.
Pensees. 1670.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
Through space the universe grasps me and swallows me up like a speck; through thought I grasp it.
Pensees. 1670.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
The sole cause of man's unhappiness is that he does not know how to stay quietly in his room.
Pensees. 1670.

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