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A (38) B (43) C (35) D (64) E (52) F (14) G (42) H (79) I (3) J (22) K (29) L (47) M (29) N (18) O (4) P (89) Q (1) R (36) S (40) T (16) U (1) V (8) W (63) Y (1) Z (1)
Peirce, Charles Sanders (1839-1914)
The one [the logician] studies the science of drawing conclusions, the other [the mathematician] the science which draws necessary conclusions.
"The Essence of Mathematics" in J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.
Peirce, Benjamin (1809-1880)
Mathematics is the science which draws necessary conclusions.
Memoir read before the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, 1870.
Pearson, Karl
The mathematician, carried along on his flood of symbols, dealing apparently with purely formal truths, may still reach results of endless importance for our description of the physical universe.
In N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC:Rome Press Inc., 1988.
Pasteur, Louis
Chance favors only the prepared mind.
In H. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1988.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
There are two types of mind ... the mathematical, and what might be called the intuitive. The former arrives at its views slowly, but they are firm and rigid; the latter is endowed with greater flexibility and applies itself simultaneously to the diverse lovable parts of that which it loves.
Discours sur les passions de l'amour. 1653.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
However vast a man's spiritual resources, he is capable of but one great passion.
Discours sur les passions de l'amour. 1653.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
The more I see of men, the better I like my dog.
In H. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1988.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
The more intelligent one is, the more men of originality one finds. Ordinary people find no difference between men.
Pensees. 1670.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
Look somewhere else for someone who can follow you in your researches about numbers. For my part, I confess that they are far beyond me, and I am competent only to admire them.
[Written to Fermat]
In G. Simmons Calculus Gems, New York: McGraw Hill Inc., 1992.
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662)
Let us weigh the gain and the loss in wagering that God is. Let us consider the two possibilities. If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Hesitate not, then, to wager that He is.
Pensees. 1670.

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