You are here

A (38) B (43) C (35) D (64) E (52) F (14) G (42) H (79) I (3) J (22) K (29) L (47) M (29) N (18) O (4) P (89) Q (1) R (36) S (40) T (16) U (1) V (8) W (63) Y (1) Z (1)
Rosenlicht, Max (1949)
You know we all became mathematicians for the same reason: we were lazy.
Rota, Gian-Carlo
We often hear that mathematics consists mainly of "proving theorems." Is a writer's job mainly that of "writing sentences?"
In preface to P. Davis and R. Hersh, The Mathematical Experience, Boston: Birkhauser, 1981.
Russell, Bertrand (1872-1970)
How dare we speak of the laws of chance? Is not chance the antithesis of all law?
Calcul des probabilites.
Russell, Bertrand (1872-1970)
Mathematics takes us into the region of absolute necessity, to which not only the actual word, but every possible word, must conform.
In N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC:Rome Press Inc., 1988.
Russell, Bertrand (1872-1970)
Although this may seem a paradox, all exact science is dominated by the idea of approximation.
W. H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.
Russell, Bertrand (1872-1970)
At the age of eleven, I began Euclid, with my brother as my tutor. This was one of the great events of my life, as dazzling as first love. I had not imagined there was anything so delicious in the world. From that moment until I was thirty-eight, mathematics was my chief interest and my chief source of happiness.
The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell
Russell, Bertrand (1872-1970)
A good notation has a subtlety and suggestiveness which at times make it almost seem like a live teacher.
In J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.
Russell, Bertrand (1872-1970)
If I were a medical man, I should prescribe a holiday to any patient who considered his work important.
The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell
Russell, Bertrand (1872-1970)
Ordinary language is totally unsuited for expressing what physics really asserts, since the words of everyday life are not sufficiently abstract. Only mathematics and mathematical logic can say as little as the physicist means to say.
The Scientific Outlook, 1931.
Russell, Bertrand (1872-1970)
With equal passion I have sought knowledge. I have wished to understand the hearts of men. I have wished to know why the stars shine. And I have tried to apprehend the Pythagorean power by which number holds sway about the flux. A little of this, but not much, I have achieved.
The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell

Pages

Dummy View - NOT TO BE DELETED