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Thomas R. Nicely
Usually mathematicians have to shoot somebody to get this much publicity.
[On the attention he received after finding the flaw in Intel's Pentium chip in 1994]
Cincinnati Enquirer, December 18, 1994, Section A, page 19.
The Bible
I returned and saw under the sun that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all.
Book of Ecclesiastes, Old Testament
Thales (ca. 600 BC)
I will be sufficiently rewarded if when telling it to others you will not claim the discovery as your own, but will say it was mine.
In H. Eves, In Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1969.
Thompson, D'Arcy Wentworth (1860-1948)
Cell and tissue, shell and bone, leaf and flower, are so many portions of matter, and it is in obedience to the laws of physics that their particles have been moved, moulded and conformed. They are no exceptions to the rule that God always geometrizes. Their problems of form are in the first instance mathematical problems, their problems of growth are essentially physical problems, and the morphologist is, ipso facto, a student of physical science.
On Growth and Form, 1917.
Thomson, [Lord Kelvin] William (1824-1907)
Fourier is a mathematical poem.
Thoreau
He is not a true man of science who does not bring some sympathy to his studies, and expect to learn something by behavior as well as by application. It is childish to rest in the discovery of mere coincidences, or of partial and extraneous laws. The study of geometry is a petty and idle exercise of the mind, if it is applied to no larger system than the starry one. Mathematics should be mixed not only with physics but with ethics; that is mixed mathematics. The fact which interests us most is the life of the naturalist. The purest science is still biographical.
Tietze
The story was told that the young Dirichlet had as a constant companion [in] all his travels, like a devout man with his prayer book, an old, worn copy of the Disquisitiones Arithmeticae of Gauss.
In G. Simmons, Calculus Gems, New York: McGraw Hill, 1992.
Tillotson, Archbishop
How often might a man, after he had jumbled a set of letters in a bag, fling them out upon the ground before they would fall into an exact poem, yea, or so much as make a good discourse in prose. And may not a little book be as easily made by chance as this great volume of the world.
In J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.
Titchmarsh, E. C.
Perhaps the most surprising thing about mathematics is that it is so surprising. The rules which we make up at the beginning seem ordinary and inevitable, but it is impossible to foresee their consequences. These have only been found out by long study, extending over many centuries. Much of our knowledge is due to a comparatively few great mathematicians such as Newton, Euler, Gauss, or Riemann; few careers can have been more satisfying than theirs. They have contributed something to human thought even more lasting than great literature, since it is independent of language.
In N. Rose, Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC: Rome Press, 1988.
Titchmarsh, E. C.
It can be of no practical use to know that Pi is irrational, but if we can know, it surely would be intolerable not to know.
In N. Rose, Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC: Rome Press, 1988.

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