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Contributed Paper Sessions

Advancing Women in Mathematics: On the Ground Initiatives

Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 5:25 p.m., Governor's Square 14, Plaza Building

Description

This session focuses on how programs advancing women in mathematics take shape on the ground. Speakers will discuss critical project components including aims, intended audience, implementation, replication, and scaling. This session provides a broad array of ideas that together form a frame for how to begin---or continue---a dedicated effort to move women forward in mathematics.

Organizers:
Della Dumbaugh and Heather Russell, University of Richmond

Best Practices and Innovation in the Teaching of Discrete Mathematics

Friday, August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m., Governor's Square 10, Plaza Building

Description

This session seeks presentations about innovative approaches to the teaching of Discrete Mathematics, the course generally required for computer science majors. Presentations could include illuminating projects and exercises, new approaches to the traditional curriculum, and ways to address new, interdisciplinary student populations. Presentations should focus on easily adaptable models and should discuss how stated learning objectives are attained.

Organizers:
Zsuzsanna Szaniszlo, Valparaiso University
Ágnes Bércesné Novák, Peter Pazmany Catholic University, Hungary

The Capstone Experience for Mathematics Majors

Saturday, August 4, 1:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building

Description

Capstone experiences vary from research, service, and artistic projects, to oral or written exams, to study abroad, internships, and more. Come and share your experiences and learn what others are doing with culminating experiences for Mathematics majors. We encourage the submission of scholarly work including but not limited to original research, innovative ideas, projects, curricular materials, assessment models, etc.

Oranizers:
Jacci White, Monika Kiss, and Kevin Murphy, Saint Leo University

Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation

Part A: Thursday, August 2, 9:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m., Governor's Square 12, Plaza Building
Part B: Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 6:05 p.m., Governor's Square 12, Plaza Building

Description

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at: http://mathfest2018.davidfailing.com

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Russ Goodman, Central College
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Fostering Undergraduate Interdisciplinarity

Friday, August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 6:25 p.m., Governor's Square 15, Plaza Building

Description

Mathematics is one educational tool to develop complex problem solvers that are needed to address many of the largest and most challenging problems in society, which are often interdisciplinary. This session invites speakers to present their efforts to foster interdisciplinary work by undergraduates within courses or outside the classroom.

Amanda Beecher, Ramapo College of New Jersey
Chris Arney, United States Military Academy at West Point

Sponsor: Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP)

Great Circles, Great Problems

Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 5:25 p.m., Governor's Square 15, Plaza Building

Description

Math Circles are outreach programs for K12 teachers and students, often led by university-based mathematicians, which focus on providing authentic mathematical experiences – where participants enjoy and engage with mathematics as a lively discipline of inquiry, conjecturing, and problem solving. Presenters will share mathematical problems and activities that can lead to hours of exploration by the curious.

Organizers:
Amanda Matson, Clarke University
Diana White, National Association of Math Circles

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)

Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching

Part A: Friday, August 3, 9:30 a.m. - 12:25 p.m., Governor's Square 14, Plaza Building
Part B: Friday, August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m., Governor's Square 14, Plaza Building
Part C: Saturday, August 4, 9:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., Governor's Square 14, Plaza Building

Description

Inquiry-Based Learning approaches seek to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of inquiry-based methods for teaching and learning.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, Augustana College
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Candice Price, University of San Diego
Xiao Xiao, Utica College
Amanda H. Matson, Clarke University
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University
Kayla Dwelle, Ouachita Baptist University
Phong Le, Goucher College

Mastery Grading

Part A: Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 4:05 p.m., Governor's Square 11, Plaza Building
Part B: Friday, August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 5:05 p.m., Governor's Square 11, Plaza Building
Part C: Saturday, August 4, 1:30 p.m. - 3:05 p.m., Governor's Square 11, Plaza Building

Description

“Mastery grading” refers to a suite of assessment techniques that encourage students to pursue deep understanding of course content. Techniques include standards-based grading, specifications grading, and mastery testing. Grades are based on mastery of objectives rather than accumulation of partial credit. Students have multiple attempts to attain this high standard for each objective, teaching them to persevere through the course.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Robert Campbell, College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University
Jeb Collins, University of Mary Washington
Alyssa Hoofnagle, Wittenberg University
Mike Janssen, Dordt College
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

Mathematical Themes in a First-Year Seminar

Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 5:05 p.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building

Description

As mathematicians, we are eager to infuse our discipline into First-Year Seminars, which often serve as an introduction to college-level academic culture (critical reading, writing and thinking, information literacy, etc.). Speakers will share their seminar’s topic, major learning goals, the ways in which mathematical themes were incorporated into the seminar, and the degree to which their pedagogical choices were successful.

Organizers:
Jennifer Schaefer, Dickinson College
Jennifer Bowen, College of Wooster
Mark Kozek, Whittier College
Pamela Pierce, College of Wooster

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula

Saturday, August 4, 1:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m., Governor's Square 17, Plaza Building

Description

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Tim Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Sweet Briar College

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA)

Mathematics Research Experiences for K–12 Teachers and Students

Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m., Governor's Square 17, Plaza Building

Description

Presenters will share their experiences conducting mathematics research with teachers and students. Participants will be introduced to a variety of problems that are well suited for these research experiences. They will learn about the findings that have resulted from these research experiences as well as the influences on teachers’ instructional practice and students’ learning and dispositions toward mathematics.

Organizers:
Saad El-Zanati and Cynthia Langrall, Illinois State University

Modeling-Based Teaching and Learning in Differential Equations Courses

Saturday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 4:55 p.m., Governor's Square 15, Plaza Building

Description

This session features talks about modeling-based teaching in differential equations courses and descriptions of modeling activities in a course from speakers who are beginning to use modeling and those with more experience. Talks featuring real data (collected or cited) and a full modeling process for students are offered. Evidence of the success of individual approaches will be given.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, Director SIMIODE
Lisa Driskell, Associate Professor of Mathematics at Colorado Mesa University
Audrey Malagon, Batten Associate Professor of Mathematics, Virginia Wesleyan University

A Number is Never an Answer: Developing Mathematical Thinking and Communication Through Writing

Part A: Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m., Governor's Square 10, Plaza Building
Part B: Friday, August 3, 9:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., Governor's Square 10, Plaza Building

Description

Many students only experience mathematics as a discipline of calculations. However students who take a quantitative job in an interdisciplinary field need to be able to clearly communicate mathematics to a lay audience via writing. In this session we invite instructors to discuss their use of writing assignments in their mathematics courses that develop these transferable skills.

Organizers:
William Gryc and Linda McGuire, Muhlenberg College

Priming the Calculus Pump: Fresh Approaches to Teaching First-Year Calculus

Part A: Friday, August 3, 9:30 a.m. - 12:25 p.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building
Part B: Friday, August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 5:25 p.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building
Part C: Saturday, August 4, 9:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building

Description

Many first-year college calculus students have had a previous encounter with calculus in high school. These new college calculus students start calculus having seen much of the material, but with a weakness or a lack of confidence in some areas. This audience creates unique challenges to the instructor. This session seeks to share fresh approaches to engage this audience.

Organizers:
Chuck Garner, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology
Bob Sachs, George Mason University

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics (SIGMAA TAHSM)

Ready or Not: Corequisite Courses and Just-in-Time Review

Friday, August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 5:05 p.m., Governor's Square 17, Plaza Building

Description:

Many students enter college not yet ready for college-level mathematics. For some, embedded just-in-time review can fill in gaps, but for underprepared students many colleges and universities are showing greater success with “corequisite” courses to increase completion, especially for underserved populations. Talks describing the curricular change process are welcome, especially examples of successful responses to rapid large-scale implementation requirements.

Organizers:
Rebecca Hartzler, University of Texas at Austin
Suzanne Doree, Augsburg University
Frank Savina, University of Texas at Austin

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, Gambling and Sports

Part A: Friday, August 3, 10:30 a.m. - 12:25 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building
Part B: Friday, August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building
Part C: Saturday, August 4, 9:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

Description

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, gambling, and sports provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education

Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m., Plaza Ballroom D, Plaza Building

Description

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students’ mathematical reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and faculty professional development.

Organizers:
Megan Wawro, Virginia Tech
Aaron Weinberg, Ithaca College
Stacy Brown, California State Polytechnic University

Teaching Undergraduate Mathematics with Primary Historical Sources

Part A: Friday August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m., Governor's Square 12, Plaza Building
Part B: Saturday, August 4, 1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Governor's Square 12, Plaza Building

Description

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in using primary historical sources to teach undergraduate mathematics. This approach has been used by a wide variety of faculty, including those with little background in mathematics history. This session brings together developers of materials for teaching with primary sources, instructors who teach with primary sources, and mathematics education researchers.

Organizers:
Dominic Klyve, Central Washington University
Maria Zack, Point Loma Nazarene University
Jeff Suzuki, Brooklyn College

Year: 
2018

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