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Invited Paper Sessions

MAA Invited Paper Sessions

Bridging Network Science and Graph Theory

Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

Description

The current session aims at bringing together researchers from different areas to learn or apply their knowledge to network science. While the foundations of Network science are in graph theory, the discipline evolved to include sociologists, computer scientist and others that are interested in understanding and analyzing social networks, technological network, biological networks and networks of information. The network science field bloomed as big data emerged, yet mathematicians are a minority at these conferences. The types of contributions for this session are either state-of-the art overviews of network science research topics, or newly developed theory/applications in network science that is of interest to the mathematical community.

Organizer:
Ralucca Gera, Naval Postgraduate School

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Schedule

Teaching Graph Theory and Network Science

1:30 p.m. -1:50 p.m.
Ralucca Gera, Naval Postgraduate School

Teaching Network Science at Different Academic Levels

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Jon Roginski, United States Military Academy

Guessing Numbers of Graphs

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Puck Rombach, University of Vermont

Tropical Principal Component Analysis and its Application to Phylogenetics

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Ruriko Yoshida, Naval Postgraduate School

Using Machine Learning to Classify and Characterize Networks

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Karl Schmitt, Valparaiso University

Seeing Red: Locating People of Interest in Dark Networks

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Pivithuru Wijegunawardana

 

Category Theory for All

Saturday, August 4, 1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom D, Plaza Building

Description

Category theory can be thought of as being "very abstract algebra". It is typically taught at graduate school or in some select cases to advanced undergraduates. In this session we will show ways in which category theory can be taught in a meaningful way to undergraduates and those without particularly aptitude or expertise in math, even high school and middle school students. In the process, we will emphasize important aspects of mathematics that are not to do with solving problems, proving theorems, or getting the right answer, including: making connections between different situations, illuminating deep structures, finding fundamental reasons for things, and improving the clarity of our thinking. The talks will be of interest for general enrichment as well as pedagogy.

Organizer:
Eugenia Cheng, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Schedule

Making Distinctions: Interpreting the Notion of Sameness

1:30 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Alissa Crans, Loyola Marymount University

Social Choice and Functoriality

2:15 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Sarah Yeakel, University of Maryland

Unifying Different Worlds in Mathematics

3:00 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Angélica Osorno, Reed College

From Arithmetic to Category Theory

3:45 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Emily Riehl, Johns Hopkins University

 

Modeling Biological Rhythms

Friday, August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom E, Plaza Building

Description

Periodic oscillations are a characteristic feature of many living systems. Cells, organs, and whole organisms often exhibit regular clock-like behavior. Examples include circadian rhythms, heartbeats, brain waves, and the synchronization of behaviors across populations. Researchers seek to understand how these oscillations are generated, how they interact with external cues, and how they persist in the presence of noise.

Mathematical modeling has proven to be an invaluable tool for investigating biological rhythms. Drawing on the theory of dynamical systems, mathematical biologists have made important contributions to understanding the structure and behavior of biological oscillators. In addition, these systems are a rich source of topics for classroom explorations and student research projects.

Speakers in this IPS will illustrate the breadth of biological questions and mathematical techniques that are used to study the rhythms of life. They will highlight recent advances and open questions.

Organizer:
David Brown, The Colorado College

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Schedule

Order Emerging from Chaos: The Mathematics of Firefly Synchronization

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Matthew Mizuhara, The College of New Jersey

Optimizing Flexibility in the Collective Decisions of Honeybees

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Subekshya Bidari, University of Colorado

Patterns of Collective Oscillations: Effects of Modularity and Time-Delay

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Per Sebastian Skardal, Trinity College

Establishing a Theoretical Framework for Ultradian Forced Desynchrony Protocols

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Nora Stack, Colorado School of Mines

Multiple Time Scale Bursting Dynamics and Complex Bursting Patterns in Respiratory Neuron Models

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Yangyang Wang, The Ohio State University

Quasicycles in the Stochastic Hybrid Morris-Lecar Neural Model

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Heather Zinn Brooks, University of Utah

Investigation of Calcium Dynamics in Astrocytes via Bifurcation Analysis

4:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m.
Greg Handy, University of Utah

 

Strategies to Synergize Culture in the Learning and Doing of Mathematics

Saturday, August 4, 1:30 p.m. - 3:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom E, Plaza Building

Description

How do we embed various cultures into the learning and doing of mathematics? What are the ways that we can enhance the learning of mathematics through culturally-responsive teaching? Mathematics grounded in the African American, Latinx, and Native American traditions as well as other international traditions can stimulate connections and a sense of belonging in the mathematical community. Presenters will provide implementable strategies to synergize culture in the learning and the doing of mathematics. By infusing various cultures into our mathematics, we enhance the learning experience as well as broaden the inclusion of those doing mathematics.

Organizer:
Talitha Washington, Howard University and the National Science Foundation

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Schedule

Importance of Culture in Indigenous Learning of Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Bob Megginson, University of Michigan

Using Computer Modeling to Integrate Culture & Mathematics

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Jacqueline Leonard

Diary of a Black Mathematician: From Research I to Liberal Arts

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Edray Goins, Pomona College

Rehumanizing Mathematics: Should That Be Our Goal?

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Rochelle Gutiérrez, University of Illinois

 

The MAA Instructional Practices Guide in Action

Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom E, Plaza Building

Description

The goal of the session is to bring the new MAA Instructional Practices (IP) Guide to life for the mathematical community. Talks will demonstrate how members of the community are using the IP Guide in their classroom practice or for professional development.

Organizers:
Martha Abell, Georgia Southern University
Carolyn Yackel, Mercer University

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Schedule

Professional Development for Collegiate Instructors with the MAA Instructional Practices Guide

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Hortensia Soto, University of Northern Colorado

Graduate Teaching Assistant Development via the MAA Instructional Practices Guide

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado

Developing Persistence in Problem Solving in relation to the MAA Instructional Practices Guide

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Angie Hodge, Northern Arizona University

Paired Board Work is Definitely Not Bored Work

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
April D. Strom, Scottsdale Community College

Five Essential Elements for Cooperative Learning described in the MAA Instructional Practices Guide

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
James A. Mendoza Álvarez, The University of Texas at Arlington

 

AWM-MAA Invited Paper Session

Geometric Ideas and Where to Find Them

Friday, August 3, 1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom D, Plaza Building

Description

Results from geometry have long captivated the attention of mathematicians because of the surprising beauty, wide utility, and intriguing proofs behind the results. Geometric concepts are often a thread connecting areas of mathematics as well as a link between mathematics and other fields. In this session, we focus on new ways of looking at geometric theorems as well as applications to various fields of mathematics, including linear algebra, complex analysis, and dynamics.

Organizer:
Ulrich Daepp, Pamela Gorkin, and Karl Voss, Bucknell University

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Schedule

String Art and Calculus

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Greg Quenell, State University of New York, Plattsburgh

From Benford's Law to Poncelet's Theorem

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Karl Voss, Bucknell University

Ellipses ...

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Dan Kalman, American University

Geometry of the Earth and Universe

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Sarah Greenwald, Appalachian State University

The Graphic Nature of Gaus sian Periods

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Sephan Garcia, Pomona College

Gaining Perspective on Homographies

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College

 

Year: 
2018

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