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Themed Contributed Paper Sessions

TCPS#1: The History and Philosophy of Mathematics

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, mornings and afternoons

This session welcomes contributions from all areas related to history and philosophy of mathematics. This includes reports on research, survey talks, and issues related to the use of history and philosophy of mathematics in the classroom. The session will also include special sessions on mathematical communities and on the philosophy of mathematics. There will also be a group of talks in honor of Karen Parshall (one of the MAA Centennial lecturers) and also in memory of Jackie Stedall (a well known historian of mathematics who passed away in the early fall).

Maria Zack, Point Loma Nazarene University
Thomas Drucker, University of Wisconsin, Whitewater
Robin Wilson, Open University and Oxford University
June Barrow-Green, Open Universityf
Jean-Pierre Marquis, University of Montreal
Sloan Despeaux, Western Carolina University
Sponsored by HOM SIGMAA, POM SIGMAA, CSHPM, and BSHM

Part A – History of Mathematics

Wednesday, August 5, 10:30 AM – 11:55 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Ellipsographs: Drawing Ellipses and the Devices in the Smithsonian Collections

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM
Amy Shell-Gellasch, Montgomery College

Charter Members of the MAA and the Material Culture of American Mathematics

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM
Peggy A. Kidwell, Smithsonian Institution

History of Mathematics in Washington, DC

11:30 AM - 11:55 AM
Florence Fasanelli, MAA

Part B – History of Mathematics

Wednesday, August 5, 10:30 AM – 11:55 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 5

Eisenhower, the Binomial Theorem, and the $64,000 Question

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM
Cathleen O'Neil, Johnson County Community College

John Horton Conway: Certainly a Piece of History

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM
Siobhan Roberts, Freelance Writer, Math & Science Journalist, Biographer

A Pair of Early MAA Presidents = A Pair of Mathematics Historians: Florian Cajori and David Eugene Smith

11:30 AM - 11:55 AM
Eileen Donoghue, City University of New York/CSI

Part C – History and Philosophy of Mathematics

Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 PM – 2:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Doing Arithmetic in Medieval Europe

1:00 PM - 1:25 PM
Chuck Lindsey, Florida Gulf Coast University

Imagination and Reading the Third Dimension in Early Modern Geometry

1:30 PM - 1:55 PM
Travis D. Williams, University of Rhode Island

The Arc Rampant in 1673: An Early Episode in the History of Projective Geometry

2:00 PM - 2:25 PM
Christopher Baltus, SUNY Oswego

William Brouncker's Rectification of the Semi-Cubical Parabola

2:30 PM - 2:55 PM
Andrew Leahy, Knox College

Part D – History and Philosophy of Mathematics

Wednesday, August 5, 1:30 PM – 3:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 5

Inspiration for Elementary Mathematics Descriptions from a "Heritage" Reading (in the sense of Grattan-Guinness) of On the Nonexistent by Gorgias

1:30 PM - 1:55 PM
Ann L. von Mehren, Arcadia University and University of Houston

Going to the Source

2:00 PM - 2:25 PM
Thomas Q. Sibley, St. John's University, College of St. Benedict

Rope Geometry of Ancient India in the Classroom

2:30 PM - 2:55 PM
Cynthia J. Huffman, Pittsburg State University
Scott V. Thuong, Pittsburg State University

Getting to the Root of the Problem

3:00 PM - 3:25 PM
Steven J. Tedford, Misericordia University

Reenactment of the Calculus Controversy: Newton vs Leibniz

3:30 PM - 3:55 PM
Abraham Ayebo, North Dakota State University

Part E – The Mathematics of Euler

Wednesday, August 5, 3:30 PM – 5:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Euler and Phonetics: The Untold Story of the Mathematics of Language

3:30 PM - 3:55 PM
Dominic Klyve, Central Washington University
Olivia Hirschey, Central Washington University

Leonhard Euler: The Final Decade 1773 to October 1783

4:00 PM - 4:25 PM
Ronald S. Calinger, Catholic University of America

Euler’s Method for Computing the Movement of a Mortar Bomb

4:30 PM - 4:55 PM
William W. Hackborn, University of Alberta

Euler on L'Hôpital's Analyse

5:00 PM - 5:25 PM
Robert E. Bradley, Adelphi University

Euler's OTHER Constant

5:30 PM - 5:55 PM
Jonathan Martin, Purdue University
Andy Martin, Kentucky State University

Part F – Special Session in Memory of Jackie Stedall

Thursday, August 6, 8:30 AM – 11:25 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Sylvester’s Amphigenous Surface

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM
June Barrow-Green, The Open University

Jackie Stedall and the Mathematics of Thomas Harriot

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM
Janet L. Beery, University of Redlands

The Construction of Map Projections in the Works of Lambert and Euler

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM
Rosanna Cretney, The Open University

Soviet Views of Early (English) Algebra

10:00 AM - 10:25 AM
Christopher Hollings, University of Oxford

Bolzano's Measurable Numbers: Are They Real?

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM
Steve Russ, University of Warwick
Katerina Trlifajova, Centre for Theoretical Studies, Prague

The BSHM, 1971-2015

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM
Robin J. WilsonOxford University, UK

Part G – History and Philosophy of Mathematics

Thursday, August 6, 1:00 PM – 2:25 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Robert Patterson: American 'Revolutionary' Mathematician

1:00 PM - 1:25 PM
Richard DeCesare, Southern Connecticut State University

Lisbon: Mathematics, Engineering and Planning in the Eighteenth Century

1:30 PM - 1:55 PM
Maria Zack, Point Loma Nazarene University

Vera on the Foundations of Mathematics

2:00 PM - 2:25 PM
Alejandro R. Garciadiego, UNAM

Part H – History and Philosophy of Mathematics

Thursday, August 6, 1:00 PM – 2:25 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 5

Yoshikatsu Sugiura: A Good Japanese Friend of Paul Dirac

1:00 PM - 1:25 PM
Michiyo Nakane, Nihon University Research Institute of Science and Technology

Ramanujan, Robin, Highly Composite Numbers, and the Riemann Hypothesis

1:30 PM - 1:55 PM
Jonathan Sondow, Independent Scholar
Jean-Louis Nicolas, University of Lyon, France

A Visit to the Vatican Library

2:00 PM - 2:25 PM
Matthew Haines, Augsburg College

Part J – History and Philosophy of Mathematics

Thursday, August 6, 2:30 PM – 4:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Mathematical Structuralism and Mathematical Applicability

2:30 PM - 2:55 PM
Elaine Landry, University of California, Davis

Designing Mathematics: the Role of Axioms

3:00 PM - 3:25 PM
Jean-Pierre Marquis, Université de Montréal

Does the Indispensability Argument Leave Open the Question of the Causal Nature of Mathematical Entities?

3:30 PM - 3:55 PM
Alexandru Manafu, IHPST Paris

How Does the Mind Construct/Discover Mathematical Propositions?

4:00 PM - 4:25 PM
Carl Behrens, Alexandria, VA

What is an Adequate Epistemology for Mathematics?

4:30 PM - 4:55 PM
Jeff Buechner, Rutgers University-Newark

Part K – Special Session on Mathematical Communities

Friday, August 7, 8:00 AM – 10:25 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

A Partial History of Math Circles

8:00 AM - 8:25 AM
Diana WhiteUniversity of Colorado Denver
Brandy Wiegers, University of Central Washington

An American Postulate Theorist: Edward V. Huntington

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM
Janet H. Barnett, Colorado State University - Pueblo

Combatting the “Legion of Half-Wits”: the Contentious Mathematicians of the Paris Academy of Sciences

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM
Lawrence D'Antonio, Ramapo College

The Mathematics in ‘Mathematical Instruments’: The Case of the Royal Geographical Society, London, in the Mid to Late Nineteenth Century

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM
Jane Wess, Edinburgh University/Royal Geographical Society-IBG

Did American Professors Form a Mathematical Community in the Early 19th Century?

10:00 AM - 10:25 AM
Amy Ackerberg-HastingsUniversity of Maryland University College

Part M – Special Session in Honor of Karen Parshall

Friday, August 7, 2:00 PM – 4:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Leonard Dickson’s Other Doctoral Student from 1928

2:00 PM - 2:25 PM
Della Dumbaugh, University of Richmond

Spreading the Wealth: The Ford Foundation and Eugene Northrop’s Advancement of Mathematics and Science at Home and Abroad

2:30 PM - 2:55 PM
Patti W. Hunter, Westmont College

The Annals of Mathematics: From the Fringes of Civilization to the University of Virginia, 1873-1883

3:00 PM - 3:25 PM
Deborah Kent, Drake University

Karen Parshall and a Course on the History of Mathematics in America

3:30 PM - 3:55 PM
David Zitarelli, Temple University

Fuzzy Logic and Contemporary American Mathematics: A Cautionary Tale

4:00 PM - 4:25 PM
Joseph W. Dauben, City University of New York

American Mathematicians Beyond the Iron Curtain: The US-Soviet Interacademy Exchange Program

4:30 PM - 4:55 PM
Brittany Shields, University of Pennsylvania

Part N – History and Philosophy of Mathematics

Saturday, August 8, 8:30 AM – 11:55 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Some Original Sources for Modern Tales of Thales

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM
Michael Molinsky, University of Maine at Farmington

A Prehistory of Arithmetic

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM
Patricia Baggett, New Mexico State University
Andrzej Ehrenfeucht, University of Colorado

Adelard’s Euclid and the Arabic Transmission Attributed to al-Ḥajjāj

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM
Gregg De Young, The American University in Cairo

Al-Khwarizmi, Anselm, and the Algebra of Atonement

10:00 AM - 10:25 AM
Valerie J. Allen, John Jay College, CUNY

Approaches to Computation in Third Millennium Mesopotamia

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM
Duncan J. Melville, St. Lawrence University

Famous Mathematicians from Iran but Whom You May Not Know

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM
Samaneh Gholizadeh Hamidi, Brigham Young University

The Quest for Digital Preservation: Will Part of Math History Be Gone Forever?

11:30 AM - 11:55 AM
Steve DiDomenico, Northwestern University Library
Linda Newman, University of Cincinnati Libraries

Part P – History and Philosophy of Mathematics

Saturday, August 8, 8:30 AM – 11:55 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 5

Finding the Roots of a Non-Linear Equation: History and Reliability

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM
Roger Godard, RMC

J. D. Forbes and the Development of Curve Plotting

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM
Isobel Falconer, University of St Andrews

“Remarkable Similarities”: A Dialogue Between De Morgan & Boole

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM
Gavin Hitchcock, University of Stellenbosch

Clifford and Sylvester on the Development of Peirce’s Matrix Formulation of the Algebra of Relations 1870-1882

10:00 AM - 10:25 AM
Francine F. Abeles, Kean University

Polygonal Numbers from Fermat to Cauchy

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM
Susan Martin, Kentucky Employers' Mutual Insurance

Orson Pratt: A Self Taught Mathematician on the American Western Frontier

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM
Troy Goodsell, Brigham Young University-Idaho

Five Families Around a Well: A New Look at an Ancient Problem

11:30 AM - 11:55 AM
Ezra Brown, Virginia Tech

Part Q – Special Session in Memory of Ivor Grattan-Guinness

Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 3:25 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Ivor Grattan-Guinness (1941-2014) and his Contributions to the History of Analysis, Set Theory, and Applied Mathematics

1:00 PM - 1:25 PM
Joseph W. Dauben, City University of New York

Grattan-Guiness's Work on Classical Mechanics

1:30 PM - 1:55 PM
Roger Cooke, University of Vermont

Ivor Grattan-Guinness’s Legacy to History and Philosophy of Logic

2:00 PM - 2:25 PM
John W. Dawson, Penn State York

“Another Big Book”: I Grattan-Guinness as Editor and Organizer

2:30 PM - 2:55 PM
Albert C. Lewis, Educational Advancement Foundation

"Same Time Next Week?": Ivor Grattan-Guinness as a Ph.D. Advisor

3:00 PM - 3:25 PM
Adrian Rice, Randolph-Macon College

Part R – History of Mathematics

Saturday, August 8, 3:30 PM – 5:25 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 4

Humanistic Reflections on Mathematics Magazine Problem 1951 and a Solution

3:30 PM - 3:55 PM
Joel Haack, University of Northern Iowa Timothy Hall, PGI Consulting

The Interplay of “Hard” and “Soft” Analysis in the History of Summabiliy Theory: Preliminary Report

4:00 PM - 4:25 PM
Alexander F. Kleiner, Drake University

The Life and Letters of William Burnside

4:30 PM - 4:55 PM
Howard Emmens, BSHM

Prehistory of the Outer Automorphism of $$S_6$$

5:00 PM - 5:25 PM
James Parson, Hood College

TCPS#2: The Contributions of Women to Mathematics: 100 Years and Counting

Part A - Friday, August 7, 1:00 PM – 3:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 2
Part B - Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 3:15 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 2

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the MAA, the AWM sponsors this session to acknowledge and recognize the contributions, achievements, and progress of women mathematicians over the past 100 years. This century has seen great mathematical achievements by women, the most recent and most public being Maryan Mirzakhani winning the Fields Medal. To honor this and other advances in mathematics by women, this session welcomes talks about mathematics done by women and historical or biographical presentations celebrating women in mathematics.

Alissa S. Crans, Loyola Marymount University
Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, Lamar University
Maura Mast, University of Massachusetts Boston
Sponsored by The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

Part A

Friday, August 7, 1:00 PM – 3:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 2

One of the Most Significant Woman in Matrix Theory - Olga Taussky-Todd

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Sandra Fital-Akelbek, Weber State University

Pie Charts, Pearson, and the Prussian Army: Celebrating Florence Nightingale and FN David

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Samuel Luke Tunstall, Appalachian State University

American Women Mathematics PhDs of the 1940s and 1950s

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Margaret Murray, University of Iowa

African American Women Mathematicians

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Darlene Butler, Arkansas State University-Beebe

Making Her Mark on a Century of Turmoil and Triumph: A Tribute to Polish and Polish-American Women in Mathematics

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Emelie Kenney, Siena College

A Well-Kept Secret: Women in Mathematics Education

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Jacqueline Dewar, Loyola Marymount University

Interesting Women in the Missouri MAA Section

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Leon Hall, Missouri S&T

Life and Research of Vasanti Bhat-Nayak

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Pallavi Jayawant, Bates College

Part B

Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 3:15 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 2

Teaching Students about Women and Mathematics: A Dialogue between Two Course Designers

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Sarah J. Greenwald, Appalachian State University
Jacqueline Dewar, Loyola Marymount University

Gender and the Pursuit of Mathematics: An Examination of the Participation Gap in Math Careers

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Kevin T. Maritato, Suffolk County Community College

Positive Female Role Models in Mathematics: The Importance, Influence, and Impact of Their Contributions in Attracting Females to Mathematics

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Joan E. DeBello, St. John's University

The Daughters of Hypatia: A Mathematical Dance Concert Celebrating Women Mathematicians

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Karl Schaffer, De Anza College

Application of Knot Theory: Using Knots to Unravel Biochemistry Mysteries

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Candice Renee Price, United States Military Academy, West Point

Dessin D'Enfants and Shabat Polynomials

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Alejandra Alvarado, Eastern Illinois University

An Introduction to Interval Exchange Transformations

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Kelly B. Yancey, University of Maryland

TCPS#3: Math Circle Problems in Honor of the MAA’s 100th Anniversary

Friday, August 7, 8:30 AM – 11:05 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 6

A mathematics circle is an enrichment activity for K-12 students or their teachers, which brings them into direct contact with mathematics professionals, fostering a passion and excitement for deep mathematics in the participants. It is usually a weekly or monthly activity, but it can also be an intensive summer experience. Circles provide rich open-ended problems that enable students or their teachers to strengthen their problem-solving skills and deepen their appreciation for and excitement about mathematics. In honor of the MAA’s 100th anniversary, we especially encourage talks that address a problem or topic involving the number 100 that was successful at your math circle.

Katherine Morrison, University of Northern Colorado
Philip Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Paul Zeitz, University of San Francisco
Sponsored by SIGMAA MCST

Coordinating a State-Wide Math Contest

8:30 AM - 8:45 AM
Abraham S. Mantell, Nassau Community College

Abbot and Costello Numbers

8:50 AM - 9:05 AM
Mary Garner, Gateway Community Math Center
Virginia Watson, Gateway Community Math Center

Exploring the 100 (and 1) Spaces of Prime Climb in a Math Teachers’ Circle

9:10 AM - 9:25 AM
Jialing Dai, University of the Pacific
Christopher Goff, University of the Pacific
Sara Malec, Hood College
Dennis Parker, University of the Pacific

Growing Math Circles for the Next 100 Years

9:30 AM - 9:45 AM
Brandy Wiegers, Central Washington University/National Association of Math Circles
Diana White, University of Colorado, Denver/National Association of Math Circles

100 Problems Involving the Number 100

9:50 AM - 10:05 AM
James Tanton, MAA

The Cell Phone Dropping Problem

10:10 AM - 10:25 AM
Japheth Wood, Bard College
Philip B. Yasskin, Texas A&M University

From 100s in a Number to 100 Squares on a 10x10 Checker Board (Or Are There More?)

10:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Victoria Kofman, Quality Engineering Education, Inc.

Spinout, The Brain, Gray Code, and 100

10:50 AM - 11:05 AM
George McNulty, University of South Carolina
Nieves McNulty, Columbia College
Douglas B. Meade, University of South Carolina

TCPS#4: Undergraduate Research Activities in Mathematical and Computational Biology

Friday, August 7, 1:20 PM – 4:15 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 5

This session is dedicated to aspects of undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology. First and foremost, this session would like to highlight research results of projects that either were conducted by undergraduates or were collaborations between undergraduates and their faculty mentors. Of particular interest are those collaborations that involve students and faculty from both mathematics and biology. Secondly, as many institutions have started undergraduate research programs in this area, frequently with the help of initial external funding, the session is interested in the process and logistics of starting a program and maintaining a program even after the initial funding expires. Important issues include faculty development and interdisciplinary collaboration, student preparation and selection, the structure of research programs, the acquisition of resources to support the program, and the subsequent achievements of students who participate in undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology.

Timothy D. Comar, Benedictine University
Sponsored by BIO SIGMAA

Building a Math-Bio Research Program at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Zachary Abernathy, Winthrop University

Ten Years of Math/Bio Research Collaboration with Undergraduates

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Jeffrey L. Poet, Missouri Western State University
Laurie J. Heyer, Davidson College
Todd T. Eckdahl, Missouri Western State University
A. M. Campbell, Davidson College

Modeling Delay in Axon Circuit

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Mikhail Shvartsman, University of St Thomas
Pavel Bělík, Augsburg College

The Dynamics of Pulse Vaccination Models

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Timothy D. Comar, Benedictine University

Simulating and Animating the Spatial Dynamics of Interacting Species Living on a Torus-shaped Universe

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Boyan Kostadinov, City Tech, CUNY

Leaf Hydraulic Conductance: Modeling Geometry

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Frank Lynch, EWU

Cancer Classification of Gene Expression Data by Top Scoring Pairs, Consensus Clustering and Support Vector Machines

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Andrea E. Ekey, Howard University
Louise A. Raphael, Howard University
Ahmed Tadde, Howard University

Integrating Mathematics and Biology Through Mathematical Modeling

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
Debra Mimbs, Lee University

Classification: A Fundamental Tool in Biology and Mathematics

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Atabong T. Agendia, Madonna University Nigeria

TCPS#5: Recreational Mathematics: New Problems and New Solutions

Part A - Friday, August 7, 1:00 PM – 4:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 1
Part B - Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 3:15 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 1

As with all mathematics, recreational mathematics continues to expand through the solution of new problems and the development of novel solutions to old problems. For the purposes of this session, the definition of recreational mathematics will be a broad one. The primary guideline used to determine the suitability of a paper will be the understandability of the mathematics. Papers submitted to this session should be accessible to undergraduate students. Novel applications as well as new approaches to old problems are welcome. Examples of use of the material in the undergraduate classroom are encouraged.

Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago

Part A

Friday, August 7, 1:00 PM – 4:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 1

Elvis Lives: An Exploration of Greedy and Global Path Optimization in a Game of Fetch

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Steve J. Bacinski, Davenport University
Mark J. Panaggio, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
Timothy J. Pennings, Davenport University

Logarithms are Hot Stuff and a New Rating Scale for Chili Peppers

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Eric Landquist, Kutztown University

Turning Infinity Inside Out: A Seamstress's Conundrum

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Ellie Baker, Freelance

Geometric Modeling of Hexagonal Joints: Carving Mathematics Out of Wood

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
James S. Sochacki, James Madison University
Anthony Tongen, James Madison University

A Trouble-some Simulation

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Geoffrey Dietz, Gannon University

Penney’s Game and Roulette

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University

Multi-Opponent James Functions

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Christopher N. B. Hammond, Connecticut College
Warren P. Johnson, Connecticut College

Sylver Coinage - An Algebraist's Investigation

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
Jeremy Thompson, USAF Academy

Winning Moves in Fibonacci Nim

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Cody Allen, San Diego State University
Vadim Ponomarenko, San Diego State University

The n-Queens Problem with Forbidden Placements

4:20 PM - 4:35 PM
Doug Chatham, Morehead State University

A New Approach to Chinese Chess Knight's Tour Using Gauss' Area Formula

4:40 PM - 4:55 PM
Matthew Mak, ACS Independent
Suling Lee, ACS Independent

Part B

Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 3:15 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 1

Cracking the SafeCracker 40 Puzzle

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Brittany Shelton, Albright College
Tyler VanBlargan, Albright College

Nonclassical Logic Puzzles

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Jason Rosenhouse, James Madison University

The Mathematics of Triphos, A World without Subtraction

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Brian Hollenbeck, Emporia State University

Counting with Fractals and the Mysterious Triangles of Behrends and Humble

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Michael A. Jones, Mathematical Reviews
Lon Mitchell, Mathematical Reviews
Brittany Shelton, Albright College

'Cover the Spot' and Homothetic Covering of Convex Bodies

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Muhammad A. Khan, University of Calgary

Dissecting and Coloring Polygons Using Power Series

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Alison G. Schuetz, Hood College
Gwyneth R. Whieldon, Hood College

Exploring Two Fascinating Integer Sequences

3:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Jay L. Schiffman, Rowan University

TCPS#6: Mathematics and Art

Part A - Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 PM – 4:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Maryland A
Part B - Thursday, August 6, 8:50 AM – 11:25 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Maryland A

Mathematics and art have a long historical relationship throughout the centuries. Ancient Egyptians and Greeks incorporated several mathematical relationships into their lives and art. In this session we encourage talks and presentations that connect mathematics and art. We would like to see a broad range of art: visual art, decorative art and performing art. The emphasis will be on college level mathematics that connects math and art in problems and projects that can enrich mathematics teaching. Puzzles, games and other activities that relate math and art are also encouraged.

Sandra Fital-Akelbek, Weber State University
Mahmud Akelbek, Weber State University

Part A

Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 PM – 4:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Maryland A

A Kaleidoscopic Journey

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Jeff Johannes, SUNY Geneseo

Artistic Patterns on Triply Periodic Polyhedra

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Douglas Dunham, University of Minnesota - Duluth

Maps of Strange Worlds: Beyond the Four-Color Theorem

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Susan Goldstine, St. Mary's College of Maryland

Virtual Bumblebees

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
James P. Howard, University of Maryland University College

Surprises from Iterating Discontinuous Functions

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Brian Heinold, Mount St. Mary's University

The Many Lessons in Fractals

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Lisa A. Oberbroeckling, Loyola University Maryland

Parametric Equations at the Circus: Trochoids and Poi Flowers

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Eleanor Farrington, Massachusetts Maritime Academy

Modeling the Mathematical: Man Ray, Equational Mimesis, and Kinesthetic Learning

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Steve Zides, Wofford College

Pythagoras to Secor: Generalized Keyboards and the Miracle Temperament

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
Anil Venkatesh, Ferris State University

Mathematics and Poetry: The Sweetest Noise

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Randall E. Cone, Salisbury University

Differential Equations in Music, Dance, and the Visual Arts

4:20 PM - 4:35 PM
Lorelei Koss, Dickinson College

Counting with Your Toes!

4:40 PM - 4:55 PM
Julian Chan, Weber State

Part B

Thursday, August 6, 8:50 AM – 11:25 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Maryland A

Geometry in Paintings: Where Two Dimensional Becomes Three Dimensional

8:50 AM - 9:05 AM
Blair Lewis, Weber State University

Geometric Islamic Star Patterns of Carved Mamluk Domes

9:10 AM - 9:25 AM
Lynn Bodner, Monmouth University

Geometry in 18th Century Japan: Exploring and Creating Sangaku

9:30 AM - 9:45 AM
David Clark, Randoph-Macon College

Randomness and Structure in Computer-generated Art and Design

9:50 AM - 10:05 AM
Vincent J. Matsko, University of San Francisco

"iFlakes": Interactive Line Designs for iOS

10:10 AM - 10:25 AM
James E. Mihalisin, JedMDesigns

Ten Years of Student Art in a Math Class

10:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Bryan Clair, Saint Louis University

Art of Teaching Mathematics

10:50 AM - 11:05 AM
Radmila Sazdanovic, North Carolina State University
Andrew Cooper, North Carolina State University

Math = Art (or: How to Enhance Threaded Discussions)

11:10 AM - 11:25 AM
Debra M. Kean, DeVry University

TCPS#7: Financial Mathematics

Wednesday, August 5, 1:20 PM – 2:35 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 6

Financial Mathematics encompasses all the mathematical and statistical tools, theories and techniques involved in the applied areas usually described as Quantitative Finance, Computational Finance, and Financial Engineering. Research in these areas of financial market modeling include derivatives pricing, risk-and-portfolio management and the theory of interest. Such works have resulted in Nobel Prizes in 1990 and 1997. This session welcomes presentations on any aspect of Financial Mathematics, including the history of this topic, the teaching of this topic, new applications or items of purely academic interest.

Richard Stephens, Columbus State University
Alin Stancu, Columbus State University

Insurance and Financial Investment Strategy under a Stochastic Process Model

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Wanwan Huang, Roosevelt University

Social Security Benefit: Now or Later?

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Amanda Mummert, Washington & Jefferson College
Katie Linthicum, Washington & Jefferson College
Kadie Clancy, Washington & Jefferson College

An Undergraduate Research Experience in Financial Mathematics

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Jeong-Mi Yoon, UH-Downtown

Actuarial Present Value: Calculations for Two Parametric Models

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Veera Holdai, Salisbury University
Barbara Wainwright, Salisbury University

TCPS#8: Mathematics in Video Games

Saturday, August 8, 3:00 PM – 4:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 3

Video games are a part of popular culture and they show up everywhere and in different forms: computer or console, online or offline, on phones or other mobile devices. There are many applications of mathematics in the gameplay and creation of games that are popular today. This session seeks presentations that share some of the mathematical applications that appear in recent games. Presenters are encouraged to show college-level mathematics that might appear in a range of courses. This session will be of interest to gamers and instructors looking for innovative examples to use in their classes.

Heidi Hulsizer, Hampden-Sydney College

Using Turn Based Games to Introduce Modeling and Optimization

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Glenn Berman, Dakota State University

Mathematics of Ingress

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Kimberly Anne Roth, Juniata College
Erika Ward, Jacksonville University

Quaternions in Action

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
Susan H. Marshall, Monmouth University

Mathematics of Fez

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Raena King, Christian Brothers University

A Math Course for Game Programming Majors

4:20 PM - 4:35 PM
Scott Stevens, Champlain College

Extracting Mathematical Pedagogy from Video Games

4:40 PM - 4:55 PM
Aaron M. Montgomery, Baldwin Wallace University

TCPS#9: What Can a Mathematician Do with a 3D Printer?

Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 4:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Virginia B

This session is dedicated to the intersection of 3D printing and mathematics: the creation of objects through the application of college-level mathematics or research-level mathematics, or the incorporation of 3D printing into the teaching of mathematics. In terms of the creation of objects on a 3D printer, of particular interest are those works that answer the question, "What can a mathematician do with a 3D printer?" This may include fractal images, knots, smooth manifolds, polyhedra, and demonstrations of theoretic or historical constructs. For teaching, of particular interest is the incorporation of 3D printing into college-level courses like geometry, topology, or multivariable calculus.

Edward Aboufadel, Grand Valley State University
Laura Taalman, James Madison University

3D Printed Catalan Wireframes: Designing with Mathematica, MeshLab, and TopMod

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Laura Taalman, James Madison University

I Can Touch the Math!

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Lila F. Roberts, Clayton State University

3-D Printing and Triply-Periodic Minimal Surfaces

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Rebekah Durig, Southern Illinois University
Oneal Summers, Southern Illinois University
Gregory Budzban, Southern Illinois University

Printing Fractals: Experiences with Julia Sets and Diffusion-Limited Aggregates

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Mark J. Stock, Independent Artist

Teaching Mathematical Art: Coordinating Design and 3D Printing

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Christopher R. H. Hanusa, Queens College, CUNY

Exploring Visualizations: An Overview of a Seminar in 3D Modeling and Printing

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Nicholas J. Owad, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

How You Too Can Join the 3D Printing Craze!

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Lewis Ludwig, Denison University

Cy: A 3D-Printed Robot for Calculus Teaching

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Jason H. Cantarella, University of Georgia

A Voluminous Vessel

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
Brenda Edmonds, Johnson County Community College
Cathleen O'Neil, Johnson County Community College
Rob Grondahl, Johnson County Community College

Goblet Design in Calculus II

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Scott Dunn, University of South Carolina
Douglas B. Meade, University of South Carolina
Philip B. Yasskin, Texas A&M University

Topology, Calculus and 3D visualization

4:20 PM - 4:35 PM
Elizabeth Denne, Washington & Lee University

3D Printing Projects for Multivariate Calculus and College Geometry

4:40 PM - 4:55 PM
Edward Aboufadel, Grand Valley State University

TCPS#10: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Collegiate Mathematics

Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 PM – 5:35 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 2

In the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), faculty bring disciplinary knowledge to bear on questions of teaching and learning and systematically gather evidence to support their conclusions. Scholarly work in this area includes investigations of the effectiveness of pedagogical methods, assignments, or technology, as well as probes of student understanding. The goals of this session are to: (1) feature scholarly work focused on the teaching of postsecondary mathematics, (2) provide a venue for teaching mathematicians to make public their scholarly investigations into teaching/learning and (3) highlight evidence-based arguments for the value of teaching innovations or in support of new insights into student learning. Appropriate for this session are preliminary or final reports of post-secondary classroom-based investigations of teaching methods, student learning difficulties, curricular assessment, or insights into student (mis-)understandings. Abstract submissions should have a clearly stated question that was (or is) under investigation and should give some indication of the type of evidence that has been (or is being) gathered and will be presented. For example, papers might reference the following types of evidence: student work, participation or retention data, pre/post-tests, interviews, surveys, think-alouds, etc.

Russell E. Goodman, Central College
Jessie Hamm, Winthrop University
Jackie Dewar, Loyola Marymount University
Curt Bennett, Loyola Marymount University

Comparing Oral and Traditional Assessments in Math Content Courses for Pre-Service Elementary Teachers

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Daniel Visscher, University of Michigan
Nina White, University of Michigan

Assessing the Effects of Interactive Technology on Concept Retention in Precalculus

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University
Lea Adams, Shippensburg University
Barbara Kaskosz, University of Rhode Island

Curing the High DFW Rate in First Year Calculus

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Adam Childers, Roanoke College
Jan Minton, Roanoke College
Hannah Robbins, Roanoke College
Kristin Emrich, Roanoke College
David Taylor, Roanoke College

Increasing Student Success in the Calculus Sequence

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Mary Shepherd, Northwest Missouri State University

Investigating Student Learning Gains from Content Videos in a Flipped Calculus I Course

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
John (Zig) Siegfried, James Madison University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

Does Calculus Help with Algebra?

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Cory Johnson, California State University, San Bernardino

Introducing Technology to a Vector Calculus Course

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Tyler Kloefkorn, University of Arizona

Engaged Learning Through Writing: A Faculty Development Project

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Mary E. Pilgrim, Colorado State University
Sue Doe, Colorado State University
Hilary Freeman, Colorado State University
Kate Kiefer, Colorado State University

From Scratch to Proof: Preliminary Report

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
Margaret L. Morrow, SUNY Plattsburgh

SoTLE: Assessing the Effectiveness of Moodle Glossaries

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Jill E. Thomley, Appalachian State University
Sarah J. Greenwald, Appalachian State University

The Emporium Teaching Model and Its Effect on Students’ Conceptions of Mathematics, Metacognitive Awareness and Course Performance

4:20 PM - 4:35 PM
Yevgeniya Rivers, University of New Haven
Joshua Goss, University of New Haven

Student Beliefs on Math Ability and Sense of Belonging to a Math Community

4:40 PM - 4:55 PM
Frank Hassebrock, Denison University
Lewis Ludwig, Denison University

Assessing the Cognitive Levels of Exam Problems in Mathematics: A Comparison Across Years

5:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Sandra M. Merchant, University of British Columbia
Wesley Maciejewski, University of Auckland

Development of Students' Bayesian Reasoning Skill

5:20 PM - 5:35 PM
Frank Wang, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY

TCPS#11: Cultivating Critical Thinking through Active Learning in Mathematics

Part A - Thursday, August 6, 8:30 AM – 11:25 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 1
Part B - Thursday, August 6, 1:00 PM – 5:15 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 1

Critical thinking is self-directed, self-disciplined, self-monitored, and self-corrective thinking. It entails effective communication and problem solving abilities. "We think critically when we have at least one problem to solve. One is not doing good critical thinking, therefore, if one is not solving any problems." (Richard Paul, Think Magazine, 1992). Mathematics is solving problems. The session will focus on the role of active learning in mathematics, and how a teacher can use it to cultivate critical thinking. We invite instructors to share their experiences and provide useful tips and tricks on implementing active learning strategies and overcoming obstacles to active learning in general. Examples and ideas can come from any type of course, from undergraduate non-major service courses and early-major mathematics courses to late-major and even graduate-level classes. Speakers are encouraged to include assessment data on the effectiveness of their active learning strategies or empirical feedback from students and/or faculty about their strategies.

David Taylor, Roanoke College
Robert Allen, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse
Lorena Bociu, North Carolina State University

Part A

Thursday, August 6, 8:30 AM – 11:25 AM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 1

Teaching Elements of Effective Thinking Through Mathematics

8:30 AM - 8:45 AM
Michael Starbird, The University of Texas at Austin

Fostering Critical Thinking in a Liberal Arts Mathematics Course through Graph Theory

8:50 AM - 9:05 AM
Elizabeth S. Wolf, Saint Mary's College

Creative, Critical and Correct: Achieving Common Objectives in an Introductory Proofs Course

9:10 AM - 9:25 AM
Kayla B. Dwelle, Ouachita Baptist University

Active Learning in Linear Algebra Through Preview and In-class Activities

9:30 AM - 9:45 AM
Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University
Steven Schlicker, Grand Valley State University

RAMScholars: Increasing Student Engagement in Learning Calculus Through PBL, Oral Assessments, and Writing

9:50 AM - 10:05 AM
Jessica Gehrtz, Colorado State University
Mary E. Pilgrim,Colorado State University

Beginning an Emerging Scholar’s Program in Calculus II

10:10 AM - 10:25 AM
Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, Lamar University

Wonders of 11 Stars: Mathematical Cultivations through Paper Folding

10:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Duk-Hyung Lee, Asbury University

Teaching Validity and Soundness of Arguments Using the Board Game 'The Resistance'

10:50 AM - 11:05 AM
Derek Thompson, Taylor University

Puzzles + Games = Mathematical Thinking

11:10 AM - 11:25 AM
Edmund A. Lamagna,
University of Rhode Island

Part B

Thursday, August 6, 1:00 PM – 5:15 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 1

Using Projects to Enrich and Expand in the Classroom

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Meghan De Witt, St Thomas Aquinas College

Using Learning Logs to Cultivate Critical Thinking Skills

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Roger Wolbert, University at Buffalo

Linked Math and English in an Active Learning Classroom

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Active Learning through Formative Assessments

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Maggie McHugh, La Crosse School District
Jennifer Kosiak, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Making Problem ~Asking the Students to Make Up Problem~

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Noriko Tanaka, Toyota-nishi High School (Japan)

Teaching with Your Mouth Shut - Inquiry Based Learning in Upper Level Mathematics Courses

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Shay Fuchs, University of Toronto Mississauga

Student Centered Learning of Number Theory for Reluctant Mathematics Majors

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Daniel R. Shifflet, Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Putting the "Real" Back in Real Analysis

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Justin Wright, Plymouth State University

Discussing Mathematical Creativity at the Undergraduate Level

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
Houssein El Turkey, University of New Haven
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado
Milos Savic, University of Oklahoma
Gail Tang, University of La Verne
Emilie Naccarato, University of Northern Colorado

Mathematics Applied Through Programming, Modeling, and Games

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Leslie Jones, University of Tampa
Britney Hopkins, University of Central Oklahoma

Blended Delivery and Asynchronous Active-Learning Strategies in Developmental Math: a Case Study

4:20 PM - 4:35 PM
Filippo Posta, Grand Canyon University

Achieving a Successful Active Learning Environment in an Online Math/Stat Undergraduate Course

4:40 PM - 4:55 PM
Christy S. Langley, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Julie Roy, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Synchronous Active Learning in Online and Hybrid Environments

5:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Carolyn Johns, The Ohio State University

TCPS#12: Improving Undergraduate Math Writing

Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 PM – 5:15 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Virginia A

From the simplest modeling equations to the most complex proofs, students often lack the writing abilities to properly communicate their solutions. In order to help students achieve coherent arguments that are both logical and sequential, math-writing skills need to be developed. Students in introductory math classes must be able to find the solution to a problem by writing down all the necessary steps and reasons for each step leading up to the answer. Students in advanced math classes must be able to delineate hypothesis from conclusion in proving statements and be able to use the definitions, assumptions, and related results accurately in justifying their proofs. In this session, we invite participants to share useful approaches to teaching students not only how to reason critically, but also to communicate in writing in a way that fully demonstrates conceptual understanding. We encourage instructors that actively practice mathematical writing across all levels of the curriculum to share best practices for student writing objectives. We are interested in hearing about specific problems and/or projects, as well as the assessment tools for these projects, which have been used to address the issue of writing mathematics.

Kerry M. Luse, Trinity Washington University
Sita Ramamurti, Trinity Washington University

Creating and Assessing Writing Prompts in Calculus and Below

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Garry Johns, Saginaw Valley State University

I Need Some Focus! Helping Calculus Students Navigate Mathematical Writing

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
David Clark, Grand Valley State University

Student Engagement and Learning through Reading and Writing in Differential Equations

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Michael C. Barg, Niagara University

Using Writing in Introductory Statistics to Enhance Understanding

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Tonya Adkins, Johnson & Wales University

Writing with Critical Thinking and Values for Effective Problem Solving

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Jacci White, Saint Leo University
Monika KissSaint Leo University
Brian Camp, Saint Leo University

Definitions as Proof Blueprints

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Andrew Cooper, North Carolina State University

Product and Process: Writing Portfolios and Feedback in Introduction to Proof Techniques

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
May Mei, Denison University

Revised Writing Across the Math Major

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Jacqueline Anderson, Bridgewater State University

Typesetting Homework in LaTeX: Best Practices that Support Teaching and Learning in Post-Calculus

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
James Quinlan, University of New England

Revising for Clarity

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Jeffrey Clark, Elon University

Why Induction Is Like Ice Cream: Writing About Analogies in Discrete Mathematics Courses

4:20 PM - 4:35 PM
Joshua Holden, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Emphasizing Mathematical Writing in On-line Courses

4:40 PM - 4:55 PM
Byungik Kahng, University of North Texas at Dallas

Teaching Mathematical Proof Writing Skills in a General Education Course: Graph Theory Algorithms and Color-Coding

5:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Robin L. Blankenship, Morehead State University

TCPS#13: Successful STEM Programs for Elementary Education Majors

Thursday, August 6, 1:00 PM – 3:15 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 2

As president Obama stated regarding STEM, “We need to make this a priority to train an army of new teachers in these subject areas.” In response to this need, many institutions have developed programs that provide STEM certification or other credentialing for pre-service elementary education majors. This session solicits presentations regarding programs that have been developed to provide this type of credentialing. As mathematics plays a significant role in these programs, the mathematical aspects of these programs should be highlighted. Presentations about programs under development are also encouraged.

Timothy W. Flood, Pittsburg State University
Karla Childs, Pittsburg State University
Aaron Flood, Missouri University of Science and Technology

Lecturing Left on the Cutting Room Floor: A Video Project for Pre-service Teachers

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Matthew D. Zawodniak, University of Georgia

Examining the Features and Outcomes of a STEM-Focused Elementary Teacher Preparation Program

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Temple A. Walkowiak, North Carolina State University
Valerie N. Faulkner, North Carolina State University
Paola Sztajn, North Carolina State University

Calculus for Pre-Service Elementary Teachers

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Alina N. Duca, North Carolina State University
Karen Keene, North Carolina State University

Graduate Certificate in STEM Education

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Cynthia Orona, University of Arkansas

An Overview of a Successful Mathematics Minor in Elementary Math Teaching at PUC

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Diana Underwood, Purdue University Calumet
Catherine Murphy, Purdue University Calumet

The Pennsylvania Math Initiative: The First Three Years

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Andrew Baxter, Penn State University, University Park
Fran Arbaugh, Penn State University, University Park
George Andrews, Penn State University, University Park

Reflections on Twenty Years of Wheelock College’s Math/Science Majors for Prospective Elementary Teachers

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Debra K. Borkovitz, Wheelock College

TCPS#14: Projects, Applications and Demonstrations to Enhance a Numerical Analysis or Computational Mathematics Course

Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 2:35 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 3

Computational mathematics is an important subject that is either an independent course or a component across multiple courses. This session seeks to gather ideas and further the scholarly discussion regarding the delivery of a course in: numerical analysis, numerical methods, modeling, and the use of Computer Algebra Systems to solve problems. All applicable ideas are welcome, but we would like to encourage presentations in areas like:

  • New techniques for presenting numerical methods to an undergraduate audience
  • New resources or tools that can be incorporated into a course
  • Applications that illustrate the power of computational mathematics
  • Contemporary research that is accessible to undergraduate students
  • Assessment tools that could be used in this type of course

Kyle Riley, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology

The Everyday Examples in Engineering (E3) Program in a Scientific Computing Course

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Mike Nicholas, Colorado School of Mines

Project-Based Numerical Mathematics and Computation Course at Augsburg College

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Pavel Bělík, Augsburg College

A Project-Based Numerical Analysis Course

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
G. Daniel Callon, Franklin College

A Novel Newton’s Method Project

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
James Sochacki, James Madison University

Assessing Student Motivation in a Numerical Methods Class

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Kyle Riley, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology

TCPS#15: Democratizing Access to Authentic Mathematical Activity

Friday, August 7, 1:20 PM – 3:35 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Maryland A

Essential to the learning of mathematics is that students engage in “authentic” mathematical activity, or what mathematicians would recognize as “doing math.” However, too often deficit explanations (i.e., students’ lack of background knowledge, lack of math ability, lack of motivation) have been used to deny students access to authentic experiences. This session is a vehicle to promote a more equitable orientation to the learning of mathematics for all students in a range of learning situations (not just the “top” kids in ideal situations). We invite talks illustrating viable, evidence-based strategies that promote access to authentic mathematical activity through inquiry that honors the diversity of students' mathematical knowledge. Topics may include 1) innovative, equity- and inquiry-oriented methods of teaching and learning in remedial, developmental, or introductory courses and courses for non-majors; 2) lessons that allow students to use mathematics to address important equity and social justice issues in their communities; and 3) programs that provide students with opportunities to engage in the kinds of authentic mathematical activities and research projects that embrace the knowledge and experiences they bring to school.

Catherine Buell, Fitchburg State University
Steven Greenstein, Montclair State University
Zahava Wilstein, Berry College

Mathematics and Social Justice: Perspectives and Resources for the College Classroom

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Lily Khadjavi, Loyola Marymount University Los Angeles

Opening a Gateway to Mathematical Inquiry

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Brian Katz, Augustana College

Seeding Mathematical Interest in Inner-City Latino Students

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Alessandra Pantano, University of California, Irvine
Li-Sheng Tseng, University of California, Irvine
Andres Forero, University of California, Irvine

What Evidence Do You Have? Data-Based Investigations into Contemporary Race Relations in a General Education Math Class

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Mathematical Modeling for Elementary Mathematics Teachers

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Elizabeth A. Burroughs, Montana State University

Undergraduate Research, Outreach and Student Activities for a "Fair" Mathematical Experience

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Emek Kose, St. Mary's College of Maryland

TCPS#16: Curriculum Development to Support First Year General Education Mathematics Students

Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 PM – 3:35 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 3

A common focus of university administration is student retention and graduation. First year mathematics courses- remedial and general education- have relatively high drop/fail/withdraw rates, which place them under scrutiny by administration. In this session, we would like to hear what you have been doing to improve pass rates and student persistence in first year courses with traditionally high DFW rates. We hope to focus on department efforts (rather than specific classroom approaches) to support students in these first year Mathematics courses. Presentations could include complete multi-section redesign, restructure of curriculum, efforts to standardize. We would like to hear about successful, in progress, and unsuccessful efforts. Presentations with a description of the initiative along with data supporting the success or failure are encouraged.

Donna Flint, South Dakota State University
Charles Bingen, University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

Redesigning a Liberal Arts Math Course for Student Performance

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Crystal Lorch, Ball State University
John Lorch, Ball State University

Design and Implementation of a Quantitative Literacy Course at a Large Research Institution

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Vince Melfi, Michigan State University
Dave Bramer, Michigan State University
Jeff Craig, Michigan State University
Richard A. Edwards, Michigan State University
Andrew Krause, Michigan State University
Amanda Lorenz, Michigan State University

Just Enough Algebra -- Or How Teaching Interesting, Useful Algebra in Applied Contexts Incorporating Active Learning Led to Higher Student Engagement and Success

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Suzanne I. Dorée, Augsburg College

System-wide Co-requisite Pedagogical Approaches for Learning Support Mathematics Students

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Minsu Kim, University of North Georgia

Eliminating Pre-Foundational and Comprehensively Redesigning First Year General Education Mathematics Courses at Trinity Washington University

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Kent Kraft, Trinity Washington University

Reorganization and Innovation in First Year General Education Mathematics Courses

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Grace E. Cook, Bloomfield College
Michael Schiro, Bloomfield College
Kevin Kline, Bloomfield College

Alternative Pathway for General Education Mathematics Students

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Rachel M. Bates, Redlands Community College

Building Learning Communities for Students and Instructors in Introductory and Intermediate Algebra

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Janet Nichols, Colorado State University - Pueblo

TCPS#17: Curriculum and Course Development to Support First Year STEM Students

Friday, August 7, 1:00 PM – 2:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 3

Poor retention in the STEM fields is often tied to students’ initial difficulties and/or lack of motivation in mathematics courses early in their academic career. In this session, we would like to hear about efforts to help struggling students in first year mathematics courses for STEM students or to help motivate students in these courses. We are particularly interested in departmental efforts, rather than specific classroom teaching activities. We would like to hear about successful, in progress, and unsuccessful efforts. Presentations with a description of the initiative along with data supporting the success or failure are encouraged.

Donna Flint, South Dakota State University
Dan Kemp, South Dakota State University
Charles Bingen, University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

Supporting Students in Health Sciences

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Magdalena Luca, MCPHS University

A Watershed Year in STEM Education at Sonoma State University

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Martha Shott, Sonoma State University

FastTrack: A Collaborative Effort to Support STEM Students

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Jennifer Kosiak, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
James Sobota, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Robert Hoar, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Maggie McHugh, La Crosse School District

Summer Curriculum for Selected Incoming Freshmen and Transfer STEM Students

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Amanda L. Hattaway, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Kathleen Grace Kennedy, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Emma Smith Zbarsky, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Implementing Learning Labs as Instructional Support for Freshman Calculus

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
K. Grace Kennedy, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Emma Smith Zbarsky, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Amanda Hattaway, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Joan Giblin, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Thinking On Your Feet Does No Harm

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Paul N. Runnion, Missouri S&T

TCPS#18: Using Modeling for Teaching Differential Equations: Before, During, After

Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 4:35 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Virginia A

Often modeling is associated with differential equations courses as a motivator for learning and as a way of showing how mathematics is applied in other disciplines such as physics, biology, and economics. Modeling can be used (1) as a way of leading up to the mathematics being taught, (2) during the instruction on the mathematics and techniques, and/or (3) after the mathematics has been taught. These three times—before, during, or after—for using modeling have the potential to support students and motivate their learning. We invite colleagues who use modeling, especially with real data, to share their experiences with special attention paid to the timing of the modeling activities with respect to associated differential equations concepts and techniques. This session is sponsored by SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations and presenters will be invited to submit their modeling scenarios for peer-reviewed publication at www.simiode.org.

Brian Winkel, US Military Academy
Karen Bliss, Quinnipiac University
Jessica Libertini, Virginia Military Institute
Nakeya Williams, US Military Academy

Modeling from Calculus to Numerical Analysis (and Everything in Between)

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Meagan C. Herald, Virginia Military Institute

Coloring Inside the Lines: My Experiences Adding Modeling to an Existing DE Curriculum Without Sacrificing Content

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Jessica M. Libertini, Virginia Military Institute

Using Real Data to Study the Heat Equation

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Kimberly Spayd, Gettysburg College

Using Differential Equations to Analyze the Energy Future

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
James Case, SIAM

Validating Groundwater Flow Models

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Michael A. Karls, Ball State University

Predator-Prey Modeling

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Hubert Noussi Kamdem, Roger Williams University

Modeling Duck-Gull-Human Interactions in California

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Christopher Brown, California Lutheran University

Two Differential Equations Projects to Help Students Apply and Synthesize Mathematics

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Michelle Ghrist, United States Air Force Academy

Inquiry-Based Learning in ODE Classes: Stable or Unstable?

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
Randall E. Cone, Salisbury University

Modeling in an Inquiry-Oriented Differential Equations Course

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Karen A. Keene, North Carolina State University
William H. Hall, North Carolina State University

Day One Modeling Discussions

4:20 PM - 4:35 PM
Benjamin Galluzzo, Shippensburg University

TCPS#19: Innovative Approaches in the Calculus Sequence

Part A - Friday, August 7, 1:00 PM – 3:35 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 6
Part B - Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 3:35 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 6

There has been a significant amount of investigation into the flaws of traditional calculus courses and possible improvements, from the Calculus Reform movement beginning in the late 1980s to the recent MAA study finding significant attrition during the calculus sequence. This session shines a spotlight on recent efforts from instructors to make a productive change. In this session, we ask instructors to share creative ideas for instruction from the calculus sequence. We are interested in general approaches and/or specific activities that a) help students engage in the mathematics of calculus in innovative ways and/or b) promote group work and conversation about the mathematical content. Submitted abstracts should include a description of the approach/activity, how it meets these objectives, and observed strengths and weaknesses compared with the traditional approach. We encourage presentations in which the audience can experience the innovative teaching and learning.

Aaron Wangberg, Winona State University
Brian Fisher, Lubbock Christian University
Jason Samuels, City University of New York

Part A

Friday, August 7, 1:00 PM – 3:35 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 6

Calculus for Life Sciences: A Two-Semester Calculus Sequence for Biology and Health Science Majors

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Anthony DeLegge, Benedictine University

Resequencing Calculus I & II

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Charlotte Knotts-Zides, Wofford College

Rethinking the Sequence of the Content of Calculus I for Deeper Conceptual Understanding

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Jose A. Jimenez, Penn State Hazleton

Multivariable Calculus Reordered and Rethought

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Robert Sachs, George Mason University

An Innovative, Three-Dimensional Approach to Multivariable Calculus Instruction

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Jason Samuels, City University of New York
Aaron Wangberg, Winona State University
Brian Fisher, Lubbock Christian University

Exploring Multivariable Calculus Concepts in Context through Physical Surfaces

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Dale Buske, St. Cloud State University

Inquiry Based Instructional Supplement (IBIS) for Calculus Sequence

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Karmen T. Yu, Montclair State University
Justin Seventko, Montclair State University
Trina Wooten, Montclair State University

An Instructor's Perspective of Flipping Calculus: The Pros and Cons

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Caleb Adams, Radford University

Part B

Saturday, August 8, 1:00 PM – 3:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 6

Teaching Calculus Using Movies and Television Shows

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Elana Reiser, St. Joseph's College

Beyond Computation: A Team-Based Learning Approach to the Limit Definition of the Derivative

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Carly J. A. Briggs, University at Albany

Elements of the Successful Calculus Computer Lab Assignment

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Stepan Paul, California Polytechnic State University

Creating Online Problems that Develop Mathematical Strategies and Reduce Student Frustration

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Geoffrey Cox, Virginia Military Institute

Where is the Differential in Differential Calculus?

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Eugene Boman, Penn State, Harrisburg Campus
Robert Rogers, SUNY, Fredonia

Five Things The Calculus Texts Leave Out and What We Can Do About It

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Meighan Dillon, Kennesaw State University

A Small Adjustment to the Definition of the Limit of a Function

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Andy Martin, Kentucky State University

Finite Topological Spaces as a Pedagogical Tool for Teaching Concepts in Calculus

3:20 PM - 3:35 PM
Daniel C. Cheshire, Texas State University

Students’ Perceptions of and Expectations for Videos in a Flipped Calculus Course

3:40 PM - 3:55 PM
Fei Xue, University of Hartford
Larissa Schroeder, University of Hartford
Jean McGivney-Burelle, University of Hartford

TCPS#20: Evidence-­Based Approaches to the Mathematical Preparation of Secondary Teachers

Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 PM – 1:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Washington 1

The mathematical preparation of secondary teachers has received substantial attention by mathematicians and mathematics teacher educators for many years, but how do university instructors and program coordinators know their efforts are making a difference? While the program evaluation process, which can include accreditation reports (e.g., CAEP) and teacher candidate surveys, encourages faculty to seriously consider this question, it is tempting to focus program evaluation on outcomes such as: graduation rates, teacher placement rates, and scores on teacher licensure exams or performance-based teacher assessments (e.g., edTPA). In this session, we invite mathematics content and methods instructors and program coordinators to share ways they gather and analyze data for the purpose of making decisions about their programs. Presentations should focus on one or two program goals directly linked to the mathematical preparation of secondary teachers. Examples include: How do you know that teachers can promote mathematical thinking and learning in ways consistent with the Common Core Standards for Mathematics (NGA Center & CCSSO, 2010)? How is your program addressing the recommendations in the Mathematical Education of Teachers II document (CBMS, 2012)? How does your program work with mentor teachers to develop candidates’ use of formative assessment?

Laurie O. Cavey, Boise State University
Scott A. Courtney, Kent State University

Lesson Study: A Capstone Experience to Address the Recommendations of the MET II Document

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Connie Yarema, Abilene Christian University
David Hendricks, Abilene Christian University

Focusing on Mathematical Arguments

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
AnnaMarie Conner, University of Georgia
Laura Singletary, Lee University

Investing the Preparation of Teachers of Mathematics: The Influence of Content Knowledge on Novice Teaching

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Allyson Hallman-Thrasher, Ohio University
Jeff Connor, Ohio University
Derek J. Sturgill, Ohio University

TCPS#21: Show Me Geometry: Geometry Software and Tablet Demonstrations

Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 PM – 2:55 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Virginia C

This session invites presenters to share demonstrations, using geometry software or tablet applications, which help students to understand aspects of undergraduate geometry. These demonstrations should be suitable for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry courses as well as for courses frequently referred to as “modern” or “higher” geometry but not those related to differential geometry or (low-level) graduate courses. Presenters must perform the full demonstration (or a key portion of it) and discuss the aspects of the demonstration that help students to understand an associated theorem. Information regarding prerequisite topics and related areas with which students have difficulty should be discussed as should problems, if any, experienced in using the software or tablet application. Presenters are invited to discuss how they have modified the demonstration over time as well as to share information about software or tablet explorations performed with students that have helped students understand the associated theorem. Abstracts should include the name of the software or application, the platform (computer or tablet), and the associated theorem as well as a brief description of the demonstration. Presenters must provide their own laptop or tablet.

Sarah L. Mabrouk, Framingham State University

Investigation of Geometric Theorems Using Geometer’s Sketchpad

1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Nora Strasser, Friends University

Active Exploration of Desargues' Theorem and Projective Geometry

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Michael Hvidsten, Gustavus Adolphus College

The Poincaré Disk Model in GeoGebra

1:40 PM - 1:55 PM
Martha Byrne, Earlham College

GeoGebra and Hyperbolic Geometry

2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University

Math on a Sphere: an Interactive Programming System for Spherical Geometry

2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Michael Eisenberg, University of Colorado
Hilary Peddicord, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Sherry Hsi, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley

Using A Dynamic Software Program to Develop Geometric Constructions

2:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Laura SingletaryLee University

Year: 
2015

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