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Chronological Schedule

Please note: all session locations are in the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel; the hotel is split between two separate structures (the Plaza Building and Tower Building). Building locations are marked for each session.

Wednesday, August 1

Committee Meeting

MAA Congress Meeting

8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Silver Room, Tower Building

Workshop

Data Science and the Mathematics Department

1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Governor's Square 15, Plaza Building

Please note: This ancillary workshop is occurring before general mathematical sessions commence on Wednesday, August 1. This event is offered at an additional fee to general registration. Advance registration is required to attend, with the option to order available through the registration portal.

Data science and big data are terms that are prevalent today, and this trend is likely to continue with the ever-increasing proliferation of data. Students with background in this area have tremendous opportunities for jobs, and university departments from life science to business are creating data science courses and programs. In this workshop, we will discuss how mathematics, math courses, and math departments fit into this situation. Specifically, we will discuss the following questions:

  • What is data science?
  • What are some models for programs in data science housed within mathematics departments?
  • How might data science programs outside of mathematics departments apply pressure to change mathematics departments courses?
  • How can a department successfully navigate this change and have the growth in data science be an opportunity for strengthening the mathematics department?

Enrollment Cap: 100

Registration Fee: $50

Sponsors:
Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM - chair, Michael Boardman)
Preparing for Industrial Careers in the Mathematical Sciences Project (PIC Math - MAA lead, Michael Dorff)

Registration

3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., Plaza Registration, Plaza Builditng

Session for Undergraduate Students

MAA-PME Student Reception

4:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m., Windows Room, Tower Building

Undergraduate students are invited to come for refreshments and a welcome to MathFest.

Session for Undergraduate Students

Math Jeopardy

5:30 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Plaza Ballroom E, Plaza Building

Answer: A fun undergraduate mathematics contest to lead off MathFest.
Question: What is Mathematics Jeopardy?

Four teams of students will provide the questions to go with the mathematical answers in many categories. All interested students in the audience can enter their names to be chosen to play on one of the four teams of four players. There will be prizes for all the participants.

Come cheer for your favorite team. The session will be emceed by Michael Berry.

Organizers:
Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University
Michael W. Berry, University of Tennessee

Social Event

Exhibit Hall & Grand Opening Reception

6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., Plaza Exhibit Hall, Plaza Building

The MAA MathFest Grand Opening Reception will launch this year's MAA MathFest on a high note. This event is intended to draw attendees together in a spirit of camaraderie. We warmly invite you to enjoy complimentary light hors d'oeuvres while you mix and mingle in the Exhibit Hall with other registered participants and guests, sponsors, and exhibitors.

Invited Address

Pi Mu Epsilon J. Sutherland Frame Lecture

The Singular Uniformity of Large Random Systems

8:00 p.m. - 8:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Peter Winkler, Dartmouth College

A random structure could be anything, yet somehow, when that structure is composed of many small parts, it often turns out to be shockingly predictable---at least, in a probabilistic sense. A random graph on a million vertices, for example, has a long list of characteristics each with high probability.

In an attempt to understand this phenomenon, we'll take a little tour from zero-one laws to variational principles, contrasting graphs and permutations along the way.


Thursday, August 2

Registration

8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m., Plaza Registration, Plaza Building

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

8:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Plaza Courts 1-8, Plaza Building

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student paper Sessions

8:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Plaza Courts 1-8, Plaza Building

Organizer:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Exhibit Hall

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Plaza Exhibit Hall, Plaza Building

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

Mathematical Medicine: Modeling Disease and Treatment

9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Lisette de Pillis, Harvey Mudd College

Immune system dynamics have proven to play an increasingly central role in the development of new treatment strategies for immune-related diseases such as type 1 diabetes and certain cancers. The critical importance of the immune system in fighting such diseases has been verified clinically, as well as through mathematical models.

Many open questions remain, however, including what may lead to non-uniform patient responses to treatments, and how to optimize and personalize therapy strategies. Mathematical models can help to provide insights into the mechanisms that may be influencing patient outcomes. In this talk, we will present a sampling of mathematical models that help us to simulate immune system interactions, disease dynamics, and treatment approaches that may slow, or even stop, disease progression.

Contributed Paper Session

Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m., Governor's Square 12, Plaza Building

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at: http://mathfest2018.davidfailing.com

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Russ Goodman, Central College
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Exploration of Methods in the Teaching of Pre-Calculus

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Keith Carlson, University of Central Florida

Spicing up a Developmental/First Year Algebra Classroom

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.g
Gowribalan Ananda Vamadeva, University of Cincinnati

The Integration of Mathematics and Science: A Plan for a High School Integrated Pre-Calculus and Physics Course

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Courtney Fox, Clermont Northeastern Schools

Effective Methods for Improving Student Retention and Progression

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Ciarán Mac an Bhaird, Maynooth University

Supporting College Algebra Students' Study of Mixture and Motion Problems

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Erin R. Moss, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Promoting the Use of Multiple Representations in the College Algebra Classroom

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Jordan R. Hall, University of Colorado Denver

TACTivities for Elementary Teachers

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Angie Hodge, Northern Arizona University

Team-Based Learning Calculus

11:20 p.m. - 11:35 p.m.
Anna Seitz, Iowa State University
Heather Bolles, Iowa State University
Amanda Baker, Iowa State University

Opening Gateways: Successful Activities and STEM Applications for Algebra and Trigonometry Courses

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Marianna Bonanome, New York City College of Technology

Invited Address

AMS-MAA Joint Invited Address

Gravity's Action on Light: A Mathematical Journey

10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Arlie Petters, Duke University

The gravitational fields of stars, black holes, and galaxies act on light propagating near them, casting magnification patterns in space. Such optical phenomena have wide-ranging physical applications, including detecting extrasolar planets and testing for a fifth dimension of the universe. Assuming no background in astrophysics or cosmology, this talk will take you on a mathematical journey unveiling the intriguing properties of these beautiful magnification patterns.

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Nonlinear Dispersive Equations and the Beautiful Mathematics That Comes with Them, Lecture I

11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Gigliola Staffilani, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

In these lectures I will give an overview of the rich mathematical structures that characterize the wave solutions of some of the most important nonlinear partial differential equations, such as the Schrödinger equation. In doing so I will illustrate how beautiful pieces of mathematics, developed using different tools, not just coming from analysis, have been generated over the years in order to answer some of the most fundamental questions for these equations, such as existence and uniqueness of solutions for example. Along the way I will formulate open questions and possible new directions of investigation.

Invited Address

MAA Chan Stanek Lecture for Students

FAIL: A Mathematician's Apology

1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Laura Taalman, James Madison University

The job of being a mathematician primarily consists of long periods of failure punctuated by short bursts of success which later seem to be somewhat obvious...but that’s what we love about it! And, as it turns out, 3D printing kind of works the same way. In this talk we’ll take a journey through many mathematical and 3D printing failures and try to laugh about it the best we can.

Invited Paper Session

Bridging Network Science and Graph Theory

1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

The current session aims at bringing together researchers from different areas to learn or apply their knowledge to network science. While the foundations of Network science are in graph theory, the discipline evolved to include sociologists, computer scientist and others that are interested in understanding and analyzing social networks, technological network, biological networks and networks of information. The network science field bloomed as big data emerged, yet mathematicians are a minority at these conferences. The types of contributions for this session are either state-of-the art overviews of network science research topics, or newly developed theory/applications in network science that is of interest to the mathematical community.

Organizer:
Ralucca Gera, Naval Postgraduate School

Teaching Graph Theory and Network Science

1:30 p.m. -1:50 p.m.
Ralucca Gera, Naval Postgraduate School

Teaching Network Science at Different Academic Levels

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Jon Roginski, United States Military Academy

Guessing Numbers of Graphs

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Puck Rombach, University of Vermont

Tropical Principal Component Analysis and its Application to Phylogenetics

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Ruriko Yoshida, Naval Postgraduate School

Using Machine Learning to Classify and Characterize Networks

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Karl Schmitt, Valparaiso University

Seeing Red: Locating People of Interest in Dark Networks

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Pivithuru Wijegunawardana

Invited Paper Session

The MAA Instructional Practices Guide in Action

1:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom E, Plaza Building

The goal of the session is to bring the new MAA Instructional Practices (IP) Guide to life for the mathematical community. Talks will demonstrate how members of the community are using the IP Guide in their classroom practice or for professional development.

Organizers:
Martha Abell, Georgia Southern University
Carolyn Yackel, Mercer University

Professional Development for Collegiate Instructors with the MAA Instructional Practices Guide

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Hortensia Soto, University of Northern Colorado

Graduate Teaching Assistant Development via the MAA Instructional Practices Guide

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado

Developing Persistence in Problem Solving in relation to the MAA Instructional Practices Guide

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Angie Hodge, Northern Arizona University

Paired Board Work is Definitely Not Bored Work

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
April D. Strom, Scottsdale Community College

Five Essential Elements for Cooperative Learning described in the MAA Instructional Practices Guide

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
James A. Mendoza Álvarez, The University of Texas at Arlington

Contributed Paper Session

Advancing Women in Mathematics: On the Ground Initiatives

1:30 p.m. - 5:25 p.m., Governor's Square 14, Plaza Building

This session focuses on how programs advancing women in mathematics take shape on the ground. Speakers will discuss critical project components including aims, intended audience, implementation, replication, and scaling. This session provides a broad array of ideas that together form a frame for how to begin---or continue---a dedicated effort to move women forward in mathematics.

Organizers:
Della Dumbaugh and Heather Russell, University of Richmond

Being Intentional: Increasing Success of Women in the Mathematics Program at GVSU

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Lauren Keough, Grand Valley State University
Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University

The WoMentoring Group

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Felicia Tabing, University of Southern California
Cindy Blois, University of Southern California

The Career Mentoring Workshop (CaMeW)

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Rachelle DeCoste, Wheaton College (MA)

Building a Community of Peers

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Alessandra Pantano, University of California, Irvine
Natalia Komarova, University of California, Irvine
Patrick Guidotti, University of California, Irvine

Leveling Up: Building Community and Confidence

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Heather M. Russell, University of Richmond
Della Dumbaugh, University of Richmond

INCLUDES WATCH-US Mini-grant: C3PO (Core knowledge, Community, and Confidence through a Programming Overview)

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Rebecca Segal, Virginia Commonwealth University

Mentoring, Outreach, and Professional Development: Activities of the AWM Student Chapter at UNC-Chapel Hill

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Katrina Morgan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Francesca Bernardi, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Women Empowered through Graduate Opportunities Awareness Transformation (weGOAT)

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Kaitlyn Phillipson, St. Edward's University
Jason Callahan, St. Edward's University
Carol Gee, St. Edward's University

Dare to BEE

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Anae Myers, Florida Atlantic University
Catherine Berrouet, Florida Atlantic University
Angela Robinson, Florida Atlantic University
Jessica Thune, Florida Atlantic University
Yuan Wang, Florida Atlantic University

Mathematics Project at Minnesota

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Alice Nadeau, University of Minnesota
Kim Logan, University of Minnesota
Harini Chandramouli, University of Minnesota

Hidden No More Lecture Series

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Alison Marr, Southwestern University

Developing Peer Networks by Producing Videos That Highlight the Careers of Women in Math

5:10 p.m. - 5:25 p.m.
Jessica Beck, University of Tennessee
Natalie Lemanski, University of Tennessee
Nina Fefferman, University of Tennessee

Contributed Paper Session

Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation, Part B

Thursday, August 2, 1:30 p.m. - 6:05 p.m., Governor's Square 12, Plaza Building

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at: http://mathfest2018.davidfailing.com

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Russ Goodman, Central College
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Building Community in the Classroom: Creating Classroom Culture and Establishing Community Norms

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Tian Yu Yen, University of Colorado Denver

Investigation of Inverted and Active Pedagogies in STEM Disciplines: A Preliminary Report A Preliminary Report

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Reza O. Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University
Michael L. Czuchry, Texas Lutheran University
John T. Sieben, Texas Lutheran University

Active Learning via Fill-in-the-blank Proofs in an Intro to Proofs Course

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Charlotte Knotts-Zides, Wofford College

Projects Applying Linear Algebra to Calculus

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Jason Molitierno, Sacred Heart University

Embodied Activities: Engaging Students via Life Size Exploration

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Sarah A. Nelson, Lenoir-Rhyne University

Intentionally Integrating Prior Knowledge into Daily Lessons

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Kristen Sellke, Saint Mary's University of Minnesota

A SCALE-UP Instructional Model for Multivariate Calculus

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Gus Greivel, Colorado School of Mines
Scott Strong, Colorado School of Mines

Sort The Sequences

3:50 a.m. - 4:05 a.m.
Sarah Wright, Fitchburg State University

Instructors’ Experiences Using Primary Source Projects in Mathematics Classrooms

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Daniel E. Otero, Xavier University
Dominic Klyve, Central Washington University
Nicholas A. Scoville, Ursinus College
Diana White, University of Colorado Denver

Engaging Students With Augmented Reality

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Nora Strasser, Friends University

Drawing-to-Learn Activity as a Cognitive Tool in Undergraduate Mathematics

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Mile Krajcevski, University of South Florida

Making Connections with Card Sorts

5:10 p.m. - 5:25 p.m.
Carrie Muir, Whatcom Community College

Transforming Mathematics Assessments to Drive Better Learning

5:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Lisa Bromberg, United States Military Academy - West Point
Kayla Blyman, United States Military Academy - West Point
Kristin Arney, United States Military Academy - West Point

Oral Assessments: Helping Students Make Connections

5:50 p.m. - 6:05 p.m.
Mary A. Nelson, George Mason University

Contributed Paper Session

Great Circles, Great Problems

1:30 p.m. - 5:05 p.m., Governor's Square 15, Plaza Building

Math Circles are outreach programs for K12 teachers and students, often led by university-based mathematicians, which focus on providing authentic mathematical experiences – where participants enjoy and engage with mathematics as a lively discipline of inquiry, conjecturing, and problem solving. Presenters will share mathematical problems and activities that can lead to hours of exploration by the curious.

Organizers:
Amanda Matson, Clarke University
Diana White, National Association of Math Circles

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)

Polyominoes and Blokus

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Sarah Trebat-Leder, Art of Problem Solving

Queen Dido Problems

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Amanda Katharine Serenevy, Riverbend Community Math Center

Explore Transformations through Anamorphosis and 3D Art

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Mahmud Akelbek, Weber State University

Positive Net Results: Folding and Unfolding

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Sarah Bryant, Dickinson College
Lance Bryant, Shippensburg University

Catapult Planning and Development Activity at the Central Oklahoma Math Circle

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Erica Bajo Calderon, University Of Central Oklahoma

Pythagorean Triples: Connections Between Algebra and Geometry

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Mark Koester, Metropolitan State University of Denver

Using Paper Folding to Create Islamic Geometric Pattern

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Rebin A. Muhammad, Ohio University

Math Circle at Racquet Up Detroit

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Ruth Favro, Lawrence Technological University
Na Yu, Lawrence Technological University

Competitive Constructions: Polyhedra, MESA, and Intuition-first

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
James C. Taylor, Math Circles Collaborative of New Mexico

The Community Alliance for Mathematics

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Brianna Donaldson, American Institute of Mathematics

Discussion

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.

Contributed Paper Session

Mastery Grading, Part A

1:30 p.m. - 4:05 p.m., Governor's Square 11, Plaza Building

“Mastery grading” refers to a suite of assessment techniques that encourage students to pursue deep understanding of course content. Techniques include standards-based grading, specifications grading, and mastery testing. Grades are based on mastery of objectives rather than accumulation of partial credit. Students have multiple attempts to attain this high standard for each objective, teaching them to persevere through the course.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Robert Campbell, College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University
Jeb Collins, University of Mary Washington
Alyssa Hoofnagle, Wittenberg University
Mike Janssen, Dordt College
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

A Quick Summary of Four Years of Standards-Based Grading

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Kate Owens, College of Charleston

The Unstandardized Nature of Standards-Based Grading Practices in Middle School Mathematics Classrooms

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Michelle A. Morgan, University of Northern Colorado

Mastery Based Testing - A Case Study in Implementation Across a Mathematics Curriculum

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Chris Lee, Roanoke College

Implementing Standards-Based Grading in a Post-Secondary Mathematics Course

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Jane Zimmerman, Michigan State University

Does Mastery-based Testing Help with Test Anxiety? Growth Mindset? Confidence? An Analysis of the Impact of MBT in Mathematics Courses

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Amanda Harsy, Lewis University

Combating Test Anxiety in Under-represented Groups

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Jessie K. Lenarz, St. Catherine University
Kristine Pelatt, St. Catherine University

Communicating Student Progress in Standards-Based Grading

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Thomas Mahoney, Emporia State University

Mastery Grading for the Masses: A Public Reflection

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Anil Venkatesh, Ferris State University

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematical Themes in a First-Year Seminar

1:30 p.m. - 5:05 p.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building

As mathematicians, we are eager to infuse our discipline into First-Year Seminars, which often serve as an introduction to college-level academic culture (critical reading, writing and thinking, information literacy, etc.). Speakers will share their seminar’s topic, major learning goals, the ways in which mathematical themes were incorporated into the seminar, and the degree to which their pedagogical choices were successful.

Organizers:
Jennifer Schaefer, Dickinson College
Jennifer Bowen, College of Wooster
Mark Kozek, Whittier College
Pamela Pierce, College of Wooster

Seminar Precalculus Through Applications

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Matthew J. Prudente, Saint Vincent College

Math Anxiety Investigated as a FYS

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Gretchen W. Whipple, Warren Wilson College

Measuring Sustainability

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Amanda I. Beecher, Ramapo College of New Jersey

Experiential Learning & Statistics in a First-Year Seminar Course

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Kathryn Cerrone, The University of Akron

Uncovering the Hidden Figures

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Cynthia Farthing, University of Iowa

Math and Art in a First-Year Seminar

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Kim Spayd, Gettysburg College

Mathematical Identities: Diverging from the Stereotypes

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Jennifer Schaefer, Dickinson College

A First-Year Seminar on Creativity in Mathematics

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Sarah Mayes-Tang, University of Toronto

Mathematics Through Fiction: Creatively Exploring Mathematical Thinking and the Nature of Mathematics

4;10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Allegra B. Reiber, University of Denver

Exploring Mathematics Related Fields--A First-year Seminar for Mathematics Students

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Mary Shepherd, Northwest Missouri State University

Cryptology in a First Year Seminar

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Emlee Nicholson, Millsaps College

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics Research Experiences for K–12 Teachers and Students

1:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m., Governor's Square 17, Plaza Building

Presenters will share their experiences conducting mathematics research with teachers and students. Participants will be introduced to a variety of problems that are well suited for these research experiences. They will learn about the findings that have resulted from these research experiences as well as the influences on teachers’ instructional practice and students’ learning and dispositions toward mathematics.

Organizers:
Saad El-Zanati and Cynthia Langrall, Illinois State University

Research Experiences for PreService and InService Secondary Mathematics Teachers: The Teacher-Scholar Concept

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Saad El-Zanati, Illinois State University
David Barker, Illinois State University
Cynthia Langrall, Illinois State University

Translating the REU Experience to the High School Classroom: A Tale of Two Teachers

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Joel Jeffries, Iowa Sate
Stephanie Zeppetello, East Leyden High School

REU Math Camp: A Genuine Mathematics Research Experience for Urban High School Students

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Lindsey States, Miami University
Kerry Hawken, Ball State University

Research Conducted as Part of RET Supplements

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Anant Godbole, East Tennessee State University

Inspiring Mathematical Research via Twitter

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
James Tanton, Mathematical Association of America

Some Number Theory Research Experience with Gifted High School Students

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Jongryul Lim, Korea Science Academy of KAIST

Introducing Students in Grades 4-6 to Unsolved Problems

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Jenna R. O'Dell, Bemidji State University
Cynthia Langrall, Illinois State University

Contributed Paper Session

A Number is Never an Answer: Developing Mathematical Thinking and Communication Through Writing, Part A

1:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m., Governor's Square 10, Plaza Building

Many students only experience mathematics as a discipline of calculations. However students who take a quantitative job in an interdisciplinary field need to be able to clearly communicate mathematics to a lay audience via writing. In this session we invite instructors to discuss their use of writing assignments in their mathematics courses that develop these transferable skills.

Organizers:
William Gryc and Linda McGuire, Muhlenberg College

Using Writing Assignments in a Quantitative Reasoning Course

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Paula R. Stickles, Millikin University

Writing With Numbers

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Sandra Fital-Akelbek, Weber State University
Jean Norman, Weber State University

Developing Metacognition Through Process-focused writing in an Inquiry-Based Learning Classroom

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Emilie Hancock, Central Washington University
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado

Incorporating Written Communications into Mathematics Deepens Students Learning Outcome in General Education Mathematics

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Hope Essien, Malcolm X College

Using Writing Ideas from English Teachers in a History of Mathematics Course

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Nell Rayburn, Austin Peay State University

Writing Short Essays in a Core Mathematics Course

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Abigail C. Bishop, Iona College
Benjamin Gaines, Iona College

Exploring Integral Calculus Through Applied Writing Assignments

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Michelle Ghrist, Gonzaga University

Writing through Applications in Multivariable Calculus

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Joy Becker, Wartburg College

Writing Intensive Upper Level Math Courses for Engineers and Computer Scientists

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Malgorzata A. Marciniak, CUNY LaGuardia Community College

Assessing Department SLOs in a Linear Algebra Class

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Maria Neophytou-Foster, Belmont University

Critical Thinking and Writing Development through Project and Paper Scaffolding in a Liberal Arts Math Course

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Karin R. Saoub, Roanoke College

Write, Revise, Repeat: Improving Student Writing

5:10 p.m. - 5:25 p.m.
Cory Johnson, California State University, San Bernardino

Writing Across the Mathematics Curriculum

5:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Jeff Johannes, SUNY Geneseo

Contributed Paper Session

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education

1:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m., Plaza Ballroom D, Plaza Building

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students’ mathematical reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and faculty professional development.

Organizers:
Megan Wawro, Virginia Tech
Aaron Weinberg, Ithaca College
Stacy Brown, California State Polytechnic University

An Initial Exploration into Undergraduate Students’ Computational Activity in a Combinatorial Setting

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Elise Lockwood, Oregon State University

Exploring Expert and Novice Understandings of Isomorphism and Homomorphism in Abstract Algebra

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Rachel L. Rupnow, Virginia Tech

Developing a Conceptual Model for Vector Cross Products

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Deborah Moore-Russo, University at Buffalo
Monica VanDieren, Robert Morris University

Specialised Knowledge of University Lecturers of Linear Algebra in Relation to Connections

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Diana L. Vasco Mora, Universidad Tecnica Estatal De Quevedo
Nuria Climent Rodríguez, Universidad de Huelva

Productive Failure in the Undergraduate Flipped Mathematics Classroom

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
John A. Kerrigan, Rutgers University

Faculty Feedback on Student Proofs

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Jim Brandt, Southern Utah University
Gretchen Rimmasch Meilstrup, Southern Utah University

Learning to Prove through Students’ Eyes: The Case of Proof by Contradiction

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Tim Hendrix, Meredith College
Karen Keene, North Carolina State University

Online Homework: What Students Think and What Students Do

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Benjamin D. Sencindiver, Colorado State University
Mary Pilgrim, Colorado State University

Constructing Formulas from Dynamic Images: What Happens When Nothing Stays the Same?

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Kristin Frank, Towson University

A Fine-grained analysis of Developmental Mathematics Students’ Background Mathematics Knowledge Using MDTP’s Second Year Algebra Readiness Test

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Eyob Demeke, California State University, Los Angeles

Panel Session

Advocating for Your Career and Yourself

1:30 p.m. -2:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom F, Plaza Building

From asking for a raise to securing institutional and external resources, this panel will discuss how faculty find and ask for resources needed for teaching, research, and other creative endeavors. What are appropriate requests and how can you effectively make them to help further your own career as well as the profession? Sponsored by the Project NExT Peach dots.

Organizers:
Zsuzsanna Szaniszlo, Valparaiso University
Leigh M. Lunsford, Longwood University

Panelists:
Martha Abell, Georgia Southern University
Linda Braddy, Tarrant County College
Richard Cleary, Babson College

Sponsor: Project NExT Peach dots

Poster Session

MAA General Contributed Poster Session

1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Plaza Exhibit Hall, Plaza Building

The MAA is pleased to announce the inaugural General Contributed Poster Session (GCPS) at MathFest 2018 in Denver. We will rotate the poster categories throughout the meeting and the number of rotations will depend on the number of accepted posters. The MAA will provide corkboards for the posters – you just need to bring your poster.

A Tale of Links between Arithmetic and Poset’s Möbius Functions

Emil D. Schwab, The University of Texas at El Paso
Gabriela Schwab, El Paso Community College

Annihilator Ideal Based Zero Divisor Graph of Z Modulo N over Z, Complemented Condition and Girth

Irawati Irawati, Bandung Institute of Technology
Farhani Farhani, Bandung Institute of Technology

Computer-Assisted Calculation in Hopf Algebra Representations

John E. Foster, Walla Walla University

Some Relations on Prefix Reversal Generators of the Symmetric and Hyperoctahedral Group

Charles Buehrle, Notre Dame of Maryland University
Saul Blanco, Indiana University

A Practical Parallelizable Fourth-Order Modification of Laguerre's Method

Thomas Cameron, Davidson College

Comparisons of Locally Determined Nonlinear Maps and Generalized Orthomorphisms

William Feldman, University of Arkansas

Convergence Speed of Some Random Implicit-Kirk-Type Iterations for Contractive-type Random Operators

Hudson Akewe, University of Lagos

Do Annular Functions Abound?

Russell W. Howell, Westmont College

From Simplicity of Monotonicity to Generality by Inequality

Anae Myers, Florida Atlantic University

Generalizations of the Enestrom-Kakeya Theorem

Aaron Melman, Santa Clara University

Vector Reconstruction: A Generalized Kaczmarz Algorithm

Anna Seitz, Iowa State University
Mary Vaughan, Iowa State University
Nate Harding, Iowa State University
Emelie Curl, Iowa State University

An AMG Approach in Solving Graph Laplacians of Protein Networks Based on Diffusion State Distance Metrics

Junyuan Lin, Tufts University

A Cost Benefit Analysis of Cyber Defense Improvements

Tung Thai, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Reduced Fertility and Asymptotics of the Logistic Model

Laurentiu Sega, Augusta University

Clique Immersion in Graph Products

Megan E. Heenehan, Eastern Connecticut State University
Karen L. Collins, Wesleyan University
Jessica McDonald, Auburn University

Iterated Line Graphs of Trees and Bi-Regular Graphs

Liz Lane-Harvard, University of Central Oklahoma

Limit Characterizations through Spanning Trees in Multigraphs: An Exploration

Joshua Steier, Seton Hall University
Kristi Luttrell, Seton Hall University
John T. Saccoman, Seton Hall University

Minimal Embedding Dimensions of Rectangle k-Visibility Graphs

Espen Slettnes, University of California, Berkeley

Radio Number for Ninth Power Paths

Joel Salazar, California State University, San Bernardino

The Saturation Number of Single-Defect Carbon Nanocones

Taylor Short, Grand Valley State University

Using Graph Theory to Design Optimal Strategies for DNA Self-Assembly

Hector Dondiego, Lewis University
Chandler Stimpert, Lewis University

Enumerating Multiple Frog Paths

Matthew Hudelson, Washington State University

A Brief on Direct Product Models and Languages

Cyrus F. Nourani, Acdmkrd AI Berlin

Matrix Powers and Symmetric Polynomials

Joshua Boone, Lincoln Memorial University

Upper Bounds for the Bond Percolation Thresholds of the Cubic, Body-Centered Cubic, and Face-Centered Cubic Lattices by a Growth Process Approach

John C. Wierman, Johns Hopkins University

Effect of Solar Variability on North Atlantic Climate

Jessica Oehrlein, Columbia University
Gabriel Chiodo, Columbia University
Lorenzo M. Polvani, Columbia University
John Fyfe, Environment Canada
Anne K. Smith, National Center for Atmospheric Research

Fibonacci Identities: No Induction Required

Ethan Berkove, Lafayette College
Michael Brilleslyper, U. S. Air Force Academy

Generalized Zeckendorf Expansions

David Terr, UC Berkeley

Primes and Divisibility Patterns in the Repdigit Sequence 3, 31, 311, 3111, 31111,...

Kryssa C. Goodhart, Rowan University
Jay L. Schiffman, Rowan University

Recent Developments on Stern's Diatomic Sequence and a Sister Function

Aubrey R. Laskowski, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Michael J. Schirle, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Solutions to the Diophantine Equation \(X + Y = c^z\) when \(XY\) Is Divisible by a Fixed Set of Two Primes

Robert Styer, Villanova University
Reese Scott, Somerville, MA

The Modeling and Calculation of Rise and Fall of the Liquid in Capillary Action by Poisson

Shigeru Masuda, RIMS, Kyoto University

Workshop

What’s the Story? Research Presentations for an Undergraduate Audience

1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Tower Court D, Tower Building

Presenting research to undergraduate students is rewarding, but challenging. The gory details of mathematical results often require specific jargon and background knowledge. Nonetheless, the big idea-the “story”-can almost always be presented at a variety of levels. This workshop is designed to help graduate students formulate a presentation on their research that is appropriate for an audience of undergraduate students.

Organizer: May Mei, Denison University

Sponsor: Committee on Graduate Students

Minicourse

Minicourse 1. Initiating, Designing, Building, and Using Modeling Scenarios for Teaching Differential Equations, Part A

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Tower Court A, Tower Building

We offer guidance and resources for developing materials for teaching differential equations using models. We discuss how to produce modeling scenarios and help participants focus on projects of their own. Sharing resources will assist participants in shaping their own modeling scenarios. Through active, hands-on, group work participating faculty will experience using modeling to teach differential equations from day one.

Brian Winkel, SIMIODE
Eric Sullivan, Carroll College
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University
Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University

Sponsor: Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE)

Minicourse

Minicourse 6. Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings, Part A

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Tower Court B, Tower Building

We introduce hands-on, practical art puzzles that motivate the mathematics of projective geometry---the study of properties invariant under projective transformations. On the art side, we explore activities in perspective drawing or photography. These activities inform the mathematical side, where we introduce activities in problem solving and proof suitable for a sophomore-level proofs class. No artistic experience is required.

Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College
Fumiko Futamura, Southwestern University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

2:30 p.m. – 6:05 p.m., Plaza Courts 1-8, Plaza Building

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student paper Sessions

2:30 p.m. – 6:05 p.m., Plaza Courts 1-8, Plaza Building

Organizer:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Town Hall Session

Mathematical Mamas – Being Both Beautifully

3:00 p.m. – 4:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom F, Plaza Building

Women have always been involved in mathematics and science. Even though we are past the days when women had to deny their self-identity to pursue mathematics, we still have work to do. With more mothers (and fathers) bridging the gap between academia and parenthood, this town hall will celebrate victories and discuss solutions to challenges that arise from this intersection.

Organizers:
Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, Lamar University
Emille Davie Lawrence, University of San Francisco
Erin Militzer, Ferris State University

Other Mathematical Session

Section Officers Meeting

3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

This session is moderated by Lisa Marano, West Chster University, Chair of the MAA Committee on Sections. It is open to all section officers and their guests.

Session for Graduate Students

Speed Interviewing Marathon for Students

3:00 p.m. – 4:20 p.m., Tower Court D, Tower Building

Employers suggest communication skills are a critical component of job interviews. This session for undergraduate students, graduate students and early career mathematicians helps participants hone these skills, with best practices and tips on job interviewing and three speed interviewing sessions to practice what participants have learned. Sessions include individual feedback for participants and opportunities to network with fellow interviewees.

Organizers:
Jenna Carpenter, Campbell University
Edray Goins, Purdue University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Graduate Students

Poster Session

MAA General Contributed Poster Session

3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Plaza Exhibit Hall, Plaza Building

The MAA is pleased to announce the inaugural General Contributed Poster Session (GCPS) at MathFest 2018 in Denver. We will rotate the poster categories throughout the meeting and the number of rotations will depend on the number of accepted posters. The MAA will provide corkboards for the posters – you just need to bring your poster.

Alternative Grading Schemes in Linear Algebra

Timothy Goldberg, Lenoir-Rhyne University

Standards Based Assessment: An Easy-to-Use SBA Quiz System

James Olsen, Western Illinois University

Mathematics Learning Support at US Colleges & Universities

David Thomas, University of Providence
Ciaran Mac an Bhaird, Maynooth University, Ireland

A Comparison of Two Approaches to Teaching Calculus I

Jonathan Hulgan, Oxford College of Emory University

The “Lost” Books of Euclid’s Elements

Chuck Lindsey, Florida Gulf Coast University

A College Geometry Course Involving Civilization, Logic and Beauty

Wen-Haw Chen, Tunghai University

Opening Up the Transitions Course: New Proof Tasks for the Creative Math Major

Jamie Sutherland, University of Delaware

Calculus in Virtual Reality

Nicholas Long, Stephen F. Austin State University
Jeremy Becnel, Stephen F. Austin State University

Application Projects to Students in Calculus for Life Science

Yanping Ma, Loyola Marymount University

Blending Team-based Learning with Standards-Based Grading in a Calculus I classroom

Jeffrey M. Ford, Gustavus Adolphus College

Developing Tightly Coordinated Calculus Courses for STEM Majors

James M. Talamo, The Ohio State University

Student Perceptions of Engagement in Calculus 1

Kristen Mazur, Elon University
Laura Taylor, Elon University

Using History to Motivate Calculus

Dan Kemp, South Dakota State University

Digital Developmental Math

Samar ElHitti, New York City College of Technology, CUNY

Case Study of Student Success

Kyle Riley, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology

Beyond the Textbook - Stories, Cartoons, and More

Janet St.Clair, Alabama State University

Choreographing in Problem Solving: Mathematical Interpretations of Figure Skaters' Blade Tracings

Rachael Talbert, Towson University
Diana Cheng, Towson University

Math Races and Jeopardy Games

David DiMarco, Neumann University
Ryan Savitz, Neumann University

Transforming Instruction in Undergraduate Mathematics via Primary Historical Sources

Nicholas Scoville, Ursinus College
Dominic Klyve, Central Washington University
Jerry Lodder, New Mexico State University
Janet Barnett, Colorado State University–Pueblo
Danny Otero, Xavier University
Kathy Clark, Florida State University
Diana White, University of Colorado Denver

Using Investigation Activities to Incorporate Inquiry Based Learning Principles in the Classroom

Gabriella Harris, Towson University
Kimberly Corum, Towson University

Classroom Stats: Spice Up Your Classroom with Fun, Live, Data Collection and Analysis

David G. Taylor, Roanoke College
Adam F. Childers, Roanoke College

Creating a Learning Map for Introductory Statistics

Heidi Hulsizer, Benedictine College
Megan Lutz, University of Georgia
Dione Maxwell, Loganville High School, Loganville GA
Jonathan Templin, University of Kansas
Laura Zielger, Iowa State

Culling Engaging Statistical Activities From the Wild: R as an Aid to Reading the News

Meredith Anderson, Adams State University

Data Science for Math Majors

William C. Calhoun, Bloomsburg University

Teaching Data-Centric Statistics: StatPREP at the end of Year 1

Jenna Carpenter, Campbell University
Michael Brilleslyper, U. S. Air Force Academy
Kathryn Kozak, Coconino Community College

Outcomes and Issues from an NSF SSTEM Grant: Recruiting, Research, and Curriculum Evolution

James Quinlan, University of New England
Amy Deveau, University of New England

Flipping Finite

Emma Wright, Plymouth State University

Polishing a Flip

Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Implementing Inquiry Using POGIL

Jill Shahverdian, Quinnipiac University

Teaching Mathematics to Future Teachers: A New Layer to the Content

Nermin Bayazit, Fitchburg State University

Use of a Popular Logo, the Five-Cornered Star (aka Regular Pentagram) in Teaching Different Levels of Mathematics

Danny T. Lau, University of North Georgia

Students' Mathematical Modeling of One-Point Perspective Paintings

Rachel Schmitz, Towson University
Kristin Frank, Towson University

How (NOT) to Make Discovery-Learning Assessments

Kayla Blyman, United States Military Academy - West Point
Lisa Bromberg, United States Military Academy - West Point,
Kristin Arney, United States Military Academy - West Point

Investigating Properties of Magic Matrices

Alexis Wilding, Weber State University

Minicourse

Minicourse 2. Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning, Part A

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Tower Court A, Tower Building

This minicourse will be a hands-on introduction to inquiry-based learning, a pedagogical approach that strongly emphasizes active learning and sense-making. Facilitators and participants will model IBL classroom modes as teachers and students and analyze on these experiences so that participants can integrate these modes into their teaching practice. The minicourse is intended for instructors new to inquiry-based learning.

Brian P Katz, Augustana College
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Candice Price, University of San Diego
Xiao Xiao, Utica College
Alison Marr, Southwestern University

Sponsor: The SIGMAA for Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Minicourse

Minicourse 5. Mathematical Card Magic, Part A

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Tower Court B, Tower Building

A survey of modern self-working mathematical card magic, including original principles and effects shared online in the Card Colm blog (2004-2014) at MAA.org. A special feature will be two-person card magic based on subtle mathematical communication principles. The material can be used to liven up mathematics classes and motivate student learning. The only prerequisite is curiosity.

Colm Mulcahy, Spelman College

Panel Session

How to Apply for Jobs in Academia and Industry after Your PhD

4:30 p.m. – 5:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom F, Plaza Building

This session is aimed at graduate students and recent PhDs. An overview of the employment process will be given with ample opportunity for participants to ask questions. Questions that will be addressed include: How do you find which jobs are available? How do you choose which jobs you want to apply for? What are academic and other employers looking for in the materials that you send? How should you tailor your application materials for the job that you are applying for? How do schools conduct interviews?

Organizers:
Edray Goins, Purdue University
Eric Eager, University of Wisconsin at La Crosse

Panelists:
James Curry, University of Colorado at Boulder
Katy Nowak, Pacific Northwest National Lab
Joanne Peeples, El Paso Community College
John Rock, Cal Poly Pomona

Sponsors: The MAA Committee on Graduate Students and the MAA Committee on Early Career Mathematicians.

Workshop

An Introduction to Team-Based Learning

4:30 p.m. - 5:50 p.m., Tower Court D, Tower Building

This workshop will introduce participants to Team-Based Learning (TBL), a highly structured form of collaborative learning that integrates aspects of flipped learning, problem-based learning, and inquiry-based learning. In this workshop, participants will see TBL in action and learn how to use TBL to create a vibrant, active classroom. Participants are encouraged to complete a short pre-reading at http://clontz.org/mathfest/ before attending.

Organizers: Drew Lewis and Steven Clontz, University of South Alabama

Social Event

Estimathon!

4:30 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

Jane Street Capital presents: The Estimathon!

Work in teams to compete in a fun, fast-paced game that melds math and trivia. There'll be prizes for the winning teams. Open to everyone: undergrads, profs, high school students, etc.
(Note that there are two sessions. Feel free to attend either one!)

Organizer:
Andy Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA MCST Business Meeting

5:30 p.m. – 6:20 p.m., Governor's Square 15, Plaza Building

Session for Graduate Students

Graduate Student Reception

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., Windows Room, Tower Building

Graduate students are invited for some refreshments and to meet several of the invited speakers.

Organizers:
Edray Goins, Purdue University
Eric Eager, University of Wisconsin at La Crosse

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA QL Business Meeting

6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m., Governor's Square 15, Plaza Building

Other Mathematical Session

The President’s Membership Jubilee

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m., Grand Ballroom I, Tower Building

An evening of musical performances by members celebrating members of the Mathematical Association of America. This event is free and open to all MAA MathFest attendees. All MAA members, new and those celebrating their 25th and 50th anniversaries are encouraged to attend.


Friday, August 3

Registration

8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m., Plaza Registration, Plaza Building

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

8:30 a.m. – 12:05 p.m., Plaza Courts 1-8, Plaza Building

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student paper Sessions

8:30 a.m. – 12:05 p.m., Plaza Courts 1-8, Plaza Building

Organizer:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Prize Session

8:30 a.m. – 9:10 a.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

The session is organized by MAA Secretary James Sellers, Penn State University, and is moderated by MAA President Deanna Haunsperger, Carleton College.

Exhibit Hall

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Plaza Exhibit Hall, Plaza Building

Contributed Paper Session

A Number is Never an Answer: Developing Mathematical Thinking and Communication Through Writing, Part B

9:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., Governor's Square 10, Plaza Building

Many students only experience mathematics as a discipline of calculations. However students who take a quantitative job in an interdisciplinary field need to be able to clearly communicate mathematics to a lay audience via writing. In this session we invite instructors to discuss their use of writing assignments in their mathematics courses that develop these transferable skills.

Organizers:
William Gryc and Linda McGuire, Muhlenberg College

Reflective and Expository Mathematical Writing Assignments

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Lauren DeDieu, University of Calgary

Math \(\neq\) Writing?

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Zoe Dai, Alma College

Journaling in Trigonometry

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Livvia L. Bechtold, University of Colorado Denver

Using Writing to Aid Pre-Service Teachers' Understanding and Explanations of Mathematical Concepts

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Kelleen Bonomo, Grove City College

Case Studies in Statistics for Business Students

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Ranjan Rohatgi, Saint Mary's College
Kristin Kuter, Saint Mary's College
Charles Peltier, Saint Mary's College

Writing in Statistics Class

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Lanee Young, Fort Hays State University

Math Without Writing: Like a Car Without Wheels

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Magdalena Luca, Massachussetts College of Phamacy & Health Sciences

Two Introductory Mathematical Writing Assignments

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Alexander Halperin, Salisbury University
Colton Magnant, Georgia Southern University

"Dear Calculus Consultant": Projects Where Students Act as Experts

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Haley A. Yaple, Carthage College

Writing on Calculus Exams: Forcing Students to Reason and Communicate

12:00 p.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Andrew George, Penn State Erie

Invited Address

AWM-MAA Etta Zuber Falconer Lecture

Finding Ellipses

9:30 a.m. - 10:20 a.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Pamela Gorkin, Bucknell University

Ellipses make frequent appearances in our lives: Kepler’s laws of planetary motion involve ellipses and a medical procedure involving kidney stones known as lithotripsy uses them as well. We see ellipses in architecture and in President’s Park South we find a park called simply “The Ellipse.” What properties of the ellipse make it so important? How can we construct an ellipse? We begin with questions like these, providing some unfamiliar answers. Then we study three seemingly unrelated problems in mathematics, chosen from linear algebra, complex analysis, and projective geometry, and we show how the solution to each of these problems relies on finding ellipses.

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching, Part A

9:30 a.m. - 12:25 p.m., Governor's Square 14, Plaza Building

Inquiry-Based Learning approaches seek to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of inquiry-based methods for teaching and learning.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, Augustana College
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Candice Price, University of San Diego
Xiao Xiao, Utica College
Amanda H. Matson, Clarke University
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University
Kayla Dwelle, Ouachita Baptist University
Phong Le, Goucher College

Transitioning from Lecture to IBL

9:30 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
Jessica Williams, Converse College

Successes (and Failures) from a First Attempt at Inquiry

9:50 a.m. - 10:05 a.m.
Kristen Pueschel, Penn State New Kensington

IBL in Linear Algebra: Same Theory, More Practice

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Robin Cruz, The College of Idaho

Productive Failure of an IBL Proofs Course

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Jeb Collins, University of Mary Washington

Promoting Inquiry with Recreational Problems in a Liberal Arts Math Course

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Mike Janssen, Dordt College

Using IBL: Daily Group Work in Calculus Classes

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University

Comparing Inquiry-Based Learning to Parenting

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Aliza Steurer, Dominican University

Tips and Tricks for Tracking a Student Centered Class

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg College

Specifications Grading in an IBL Classroom

12:10 p.m. - 12:25 p.m.
Anne Sinko, College of St. Benedict/St. John's University

Contributed Paper Session

Priming the Calculus Pump: Fresh Approaches to Teaching First-Year Calculus, Part A

9:30 a.m. - 12:25 p.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building

Many first-year college calculus students have had a previous encounter with calculus in high school. These new college calculus students start calculus having seen much of the material, but with a weakness or a lack of confidence in some areas. This audience creates unique challenges to the instructor. This session seeks to share fresh approaches to engage this audience.

Organizers:
Chuck Garner, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology
Bob Sachs, George Mason University

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics (SIGMAA TAHSM)

Re-envisioning the Calculus Sequence

9:30 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Alison Marr, Southwestern University

An Integrated Interactive Approach to the Calculus Sequence

9:50 a.m. - 10:05 a.m.
Joseph Spivey, Wofford College
Matthew Cathey, Wofford College

Calculus in Context: An Innovative Approach to Calculus

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Sarah Hews, Hampshire College

Calculus for Students Who Already "Know" Calculus

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
William T. Mahavier, Lamar University

Calculus in the Real World: Increasing Relevancy Through Data and Modeling

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Rachel Grotheer, Goucher College

Implementing Preclass Readings in Calculus

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Salam Turki, Rhode Island College
Houssein El Turkey, University of New Haven
Yasanthi Kottegoda, University of New Haven

Boot Camp for Freshmen Calculus I Students

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Peter Olszewski, Penn State Behrend

Strategies that Support Students Meeting the Demands of a First-Year Calculus Course

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
Aaron Trocki, Elon University
Karen Yokley, Elon University
Jan Mays, Elon University
James Beuerle, Elon University

Moving Calculus from the Classroom to the Boardroom

12:10 p.m. - 12:25 p.m.
Della Dumbaugh, University of Richmond

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Nonlinear Dispersive Equations and the Beautiful Mathematics That Comes with Them, Lecture II

10:30 a.m. – 11:20 a.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Gigliola Staffilani, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

In these lectures I will give an overview of the rich mathematical structures that characterize the wave solutions of some of the most important nonlinear partial differential equations, such as the Schrödinger equation. In doing so I will illustrate how beautiful pieces of mathematics, developed using different tools, not just coming from analysis, have been generated over the years in order to answer some of the most fundamental questions for these equations, such as existence and uniqueness of solutions for example. Along the way I will formulate open questions and possible new directions of investigation.

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, Gambling and Sports, Part A

10:30 a.m. - 12:25 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, gambling, and sports provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome.

Organizers: Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Using Advanced Accuracy Data and Machine Learning to Model Quality of Play at the Quarterback Position

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Eric Eager, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse
George Chahrouri, Pro Football Focus

Building a Numerical Baseball Simulator

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Paul von Dohlen, William Paterson University

Tournament Scheduling Improvements

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Jeff Poet, Missouri Western State University

Fantasy on a Baseball Theme

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Thomas Q. Sibley, St. John's University

Would Wheel of Fortune be Easier in Dothraki or Klingon?

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
Benjamin Wilson, Stevenson University

Beyond the "Monty Hall Problem": The Mathematics of Let's Make a Deal

12:10 p.m. - 12:25 p.m.
Anthony DeLegge, Benedictine University

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

Inclusion-exclusion in Mathematics: Who Stays in, Who Falls out, Why It Happens, and What We Should Do About It

11:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Eugenia Cheng, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

The question of why women are under-represented in mathematics is complex and there are no simple answers, only many contributing factors. I will focus on character traits, and argue that if we focus on this rather than gender we can have a more productive and less divisive conversation. To try and focus on characters rather than genders I will introduce gender-neutral character adjectives "ingressive" and "congressive" to replace masculine and feminine. I will share my experience of teaching congressive abstract mathematics to art students, in a congressive way, and the possible effects this could have for everyone in mathematics, not just women. I will present the field of Category Theory as a particularly congressive subject area, accessible to bright high school students, and contrast it with the types of math that are often used to push or stimulate those students. No prior knowledge will be needed.

Invited Address

NAM David Harold Blackwell Lecture

Continuous, Discrete, or Somewhere in Between: An Introduction to Time Scales with Applications

1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Raegan Higgins, Texas Tech University

Since Stefan Hilger's landmark paper in 1988, progress has been made in the unification and extension of discrete and continuous analysis. The broad idea is to prove a result once for a dynamic equation where the domain of the unknown function is a time scale \(\mathbb{T}\), which is an arbitrary, nonempty, closed subset of the real numbers.

In this talk, we will use the exponential function \(e^{pt}\) to introduce the theory of time scales. Considering a certain second-order linear delay dynamic equation, we establish some sufficient conditions which ensure that every solution oscillates. The obtained results unify the oscillation of second-order delay differential and difference equations.

Our interest in delay equations has lead us to study a certain area of mathematical physiology. We are using mathematical models to understand how behavioral disruption of the circadian clock can lead to glucose dysregulation. In this talk, we present some preliminary results.

Poster Session

MAA General Contributed Poster Session

1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m., Plaza Exhibit Hall, Plaza Building

The MAA is pleased to announce the inaugural General Contributed Poster Session (GCPS) at MathFest 2018 in Denver. We will rotate the poster categories throughout the meeting and the number of rotations will depend on the number of accepted posters. The MAA will provide corkboards for the posters – you just need to bring your poster.

A Better Path to Math Careers

Tim McEldowney, University of California, Riverside

Girls <3 "Hands On Mathematics"

Victoria Kofman, Stella Academy

Partnerships Within and Without: Expanding the Reach of the Mathematical Sciences at the University of the Virgin Islands

Camille McKayle, University of the Virgin Islands
Robert Stolz, University of the Virgin Islands
Nadia Monrose, University of the Virgin Islands

Use Interinstitutional Collaboration and Cyberlearning to Offer Computational Science Courses for a Computational Math Degree Program in a Small University

Hong P. Liu, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Beautiful Integer Patterns, Version 4.0: Variations on a Binomial Theme

Charlie Smith, Park University

A Machine Learning Approach to Designing Guidelines for Acute AquaticToxicity

Barry C. Husowitz, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Discussing Mathematical Microaggressions with Pre-Service K-8 Teachers

Zachary Beamer, University of Virginia

Letting Teachers Notice and Wonder

Derek J. Sturgill, University of Wisconsin: Stout

Relationship between Students Van Hiele Levels and the Geometric Content

John F. Ekpe, Accra Technical University

Thinking Outside the Plane: Teaching Not-Euclidean Geometries at Pre-College Levels

J. Mealy, Austin College
Tyler Shaw, Austin College

Reducing Student Testing Anxiety by Implementing a Three-Stage Group Testing Method

Suzanne Caulfield, Cardinal Stritch University

The Initial Development of ICAP4Calc: An Inventory of Algebra Concepts

Bradley J. Paynter, University of Central Oklahoma
Elizabeth Lane-Harvard, University of Central Oklahoma

Using History to Integrate a Faith-Based Mission into the Mathematics Classroom

Caira B. Bongers, Bryn Athyn College

What Should We Teach in Mathematics as Artificial Intelligence Becomes Increasingly Powerful?

Alexander G. Atwood, Suffolk County Community College

Views on an Open Technology Policy in Mathematics Classrooms

James R. Valles, Jr., Prairie View A&M University

Providing Mathematics Students a Transformative Learning Experience Beyond the Classroom

Kristi Karber, University of Central Oklahoma

Establishing Practices Integrating Commuter Students - Year 1

Mindy B. Capaldi, Valparaiso University

Whose Math and For What Purpose? A Community Seminar on Identity, Culture, and Mathematics

Gizem Karaali, Pomona College

Logarithmic Patterns in Classical Music

Azar Khosravani, Columbia College Chicago

Number Talks: A Vehicle for Understanding

Jennifer Bergner, Salisbury University

Sequences with the Zeckendorf Property

Curtis Herink, Mercer Universiy

Surviving the Apocalypse with a Compass and a Straight Edge

Grace E. Cook, Bloomfield College

Colorado State University - Pueblo - 40 years and Counting

Janet Nichols, Colorado State University - Pueblo

Summer Illinois Math Camp

Claire Merriman, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Emily Heath, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Simone Sisneros-Thiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Jenna Zomback, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Taking Math to the Streets

Axel Brandt, Northern Kentucky University
Tanya Chartier, The Davidson Center
Tim Chartier, Davidson College

The 2018 SUMMA Math Teachers' Circle Workshop

David R. Scott, Univ. of Puget Sound

L(2,1)-Labeling OF Circulant Graphs

Soumya Bhoumik, Fort Hays State University
Sarbari Mitra, Fort Hays State University

A Missing Entry in Sullivan's Dictionary?

Colby Kelln, University of Michigan
Sean Kelly, University of Michigan
Justin Lee, University of Michigan

Teach-Touch (Economics)

Galit Eizman, Harvard University

Student Assumptions about An Introductory Course in Business Statistics and Their Impact on Learning Outcomes

Deborah J. Gougeon, University of Scranton

Motiving Students through Extra-Curricular Activities

Ge Mu, Penn State New Kensington

An Invitation to Study Mathematics: The First-year Seminar Course at Colorado Mesa University

Tracii Friedman, Colorado Mesa University

Measuring Income Inequality in a General Education or Calculus Mathematics Classroom

Barbara O'Donovan, Saint Michael's College

Use of Multimedia Technology for Effective Teaching and Learning of Plane Geometry at the Middle Basic School Level in Nigeria

Solomon A. Iyekekpolor, Taraba State University
Oyeniyi Solomon Olayinka, Taraba State University

Invited Paper Session

Modeling Biological Rhythms

1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Plaza Ballroom E, Plaza Building

Periodic oscillations are a characteristic feature of many living systems. Cells, organs, and whole organisms often exhibit regular clock-like behavior. Examples include circadian rhythms, heartbeats, brain waves, and the synchronization of behaviors across populations. Researchers seek to understand how these oscillations are generated, how they interact with external cues, and how they persist in the presence of noise.

Mathematical modeling has proven to be an invaluable tool for investigating biological rhythms. Drawing on the theory of dynamical systems, mathematical biologists have made important contributions to understanding the structure and behavior of biological oscillators. In addition, these systems are a rich source of topics for classroom explorations and student research projects.

Speakers in this IPS will illustrate the breadth of biological questions and mathematical techniques that are used to study the rhythms of life. They will highlight recent advances and open questions.

Organizer:
David Brown, The Colorado College

Order Emerging from Chaos: The Mathematics of Firefly Synchronization

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Matthew Mizuhara, The College of New Jersey

Optimizing Flexibility in the Collective Decisions of Honeybees

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Subekshya Bidari, University of Colorado

Patterns of Collective Oscillations: Effects of Modularity and Time-Delay

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Per Sebastian Skardal, Trinity College

Establishing a Theoretical Framework for Ultradian Forced Desynchrony Protocols

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Nora Stack, Colorado School of Mines

Multiple Time Scale Bursting Dynamics and Complex Bursting Patterns in Respiratory Neuron Models

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Yangyang Wang, The Ohio State University

Quasicycles in the Stochastic Hybrid Morris-Lecar Neural Model

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Heather Zinn Brooks, University of Utah

Investigation of Calcium Dynamics in Astrocytes via Bifurcation Analysis

4:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m.
Greg Handy, University of Utah

AWM-MAA Invited Paper Session

Geometric Ideas and Where to Find Them

1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom D, Plaza Building

Results from geometry have long captivated the attention of mathematicians because of the surprising beauty, wide utility, and intriguing proofs behind the results. Geometric concepts are often a thread connecting areas of mathematics as well as a link between mathematics and other fields. In this session, we focus on new ways of looking at geometric theorems as well as applications to various fields of mathematics, including linear algebra, complex analysis, and dynamics.

Organizer:
Ulrich Daepp, Pamela Gorkin, and Karl Voss, Bucknell University

String Art and Calculus

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Greg Quenell, State University of New York, Plattsburgh

From Benford's Law to Poncelet's Theorem

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Karl Voss, Bucknell University

Ellipses ...

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Dan Kalman, American University

Geometry of the Earth and Universe

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Sarah Greenwald, Appalachian State University

The Graphic Nature of Gaus sian Periods

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Sephan Garcia, Pomona College

Gaining Perspective on Homographies

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College

Contributed Paper Session

Best Practices and Innovation in the Teaching of Discrete Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m., Governor's Square 10, Plaza Building

This session seeks presentations about innovative approaches to the teaching of Discrete Mathematics, the course generally required for computer science majors. Presentations could include illuminating projects and exercises, new approaches to the traditional curriculum, and ways to address new, interdisciplinary student populations. Presentations should focus on easily adaptable models and should discuss how stated learning objectives are attained.

Organizers:
Zsuzsanna Szaniszlo, Valparaiso University
Ágnes Bércesné Novák, Peter Pazmany Catholic University

Implementing WebAssign in Discrete Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Kathleen Shannon, Salisbury University

IBL in Discrete Mathematics

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Breanne Garrett, William Penn University
Elizabeth Overturf, William Penn University
Kiera MacPherson, William Penn University

Count That Tune: Teaching Counting With Musical Examples

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Kurt Ludwick, Salisbury University

Discovering Binomial Coefficients

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Zsuzsanna Szaniszlo, Valparaiso University

Short Case Studies to Improve Student Understanding of Intricacies of Counting Problems

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University

Using the Boards of Board Games to Motivate Graphs

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Teena Carroll, Emory & Henry College

Video Project for a Discrete Math Course

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Anthony Bosman, Andrews University

Uncovering Critical Nodes in a Supply Chain: Connecting Graph and Network Theory to Supply Chain Risk Management

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Donna Beers, Simmons College

Writing and Revising to Conquer Proofs in Discrete Mathematics

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Jordan Tirrell, Mount Holyoke College

Counting the Keyspace of WWII's Enigma, and What it Can Teach us About Modern Cryptography

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Gregory V. Bard, University of Wisconsin-Stout

Contributed Paper Session

Fostering Undergraduate Interdisciplinarity

1:30 p.m. - 6:25 p.m., Governor's Square 15, Plaza Building

Mathematics is one educational tool to develop complex problem solvers that are needed to address many of the largest and most challenging problems in society, which are often interdisciplinary. This session invites speakers to present their efforts to foster interdisciplinary work by undergraduates within courses or outside the classroom.

Organizers:
Amanda Beecher, Ramapo College of New Jersey
Chris Arney, United States Military Academy at West Point

Sponsor: Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP)

Interdisciplinary Work At a Small Institution

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Kasie Farlow, Dominican College

How Does Climate Change Influence Regional Instability?

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Sijia Fan, Skidmore College
Ran Tao, Skidmore College
Kaifeng Yang, Skidmore College

Collaborating with Partner Disciplines to Develop Interdisciplinary Simulations, Case Studies, and Inquiry-Based Activities in Quantitative Reasoning

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Incorporating Disciplinary Knowledge through Adaptive Learning Modules

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Michelle L. Isenhour, Naval Postgraduate School
Ralucca Gera, Naval Postgraduate School

Connecting Disciplines Using Science Fiction

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Sarah Cobb, Midwestern State University
Jeff Hood, Midwestern State University
Peter Fields, Midwestern State University

Fauré or 4A: A Foray into the Math of Music

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Mark Rasmussen, Siena Heights University

Coordinated Calculus and Physics

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Kelly Black, University of Georgia
Guangming Yao, Clarkson University
Michael Ramsdell, Clarkson University
Craig Wiegert, University of Georgia

The Moose and Wolves Project: Uniting Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Population Ecology in a Case Study of the Isle Royale National Park

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Steven Morse, United States Military Academy
Stanley Florkowski, III, United States Military Academy

Lurch Validates Plato: An Application of Proof Verification Software to Philosophy

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Kenneth G. Monks, University of Scranton
Nathan Carter, Bentley University

Where To Draw The Line: Metrics of Gerrymandering

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Adeline R. Jacobsen, University of Washington-Tacoma
Connor Louis Myers, University of Washington-Tacoma

Building a Research Group on an Empty Lot

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Marcos Lopez, Midwestern State University
Terry Griffin, Midwestern State University

An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Research Project in Compressor Surge Modeling

5:10 p.m. - 5:25 p.m.
Jeong-Mi Yoon, University of Houston - Downtown
Weining Feng, University of Houston - Downtown

Catastrophe Modeling: A Case Study in Vocational Curriculum

5:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
John Haga, Wentworth Institute of Technology

What’s the Damage? Modeling of Cholera Dynamics to Compute the Cost of Insurance

5:50 p.m. - 6:05 p.m.
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Save the Cranes! Mathematical Modeling within an Environmental Conservation Effort

6:10 p.m. - 6:25 p.m.
Edward W. Swim, Sam Houston State University
John G. Alford, Sam Houston State University

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m., Governor's Square 14, Plaza Building

Inquiry-Based Learning approaches seek to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of inquiry-based methods for teaching and learning.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, Augustana College
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Candice Price, University of San Diego
Xiao Xiao, Utica College
Amanda H. Matson, Clarke University
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University
Kayla Dwelle, Ouachita Baptist University
Phong Le, Goucher College

An Online IBL Geometry Class

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Nathaniel Miller, University of Northern Colorado

Experience of a Noyce-student Learning Assistant in an Inquiry Based Learning Class

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Melissa Riley, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Michael E. Matthews, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Dora Matache, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Integrating a Learning Assistant Program with a Dedicated Learning Center

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Gina Monks, Penn State Hazleton

Sneaking IBL into College Prep Intermediate Algebra through 35-Minute Activities

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Chris Oehrlein, Oklahoma City Community College

Engaging Students in Algebraic Thinking by Pairing Coding with Active Learning Strategies

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Betty Love, University of Nebraska - Omaha
Victor Winter, University of Nebraska - Omaha
Michael Matthews, University of Nebraska - Omaha
Michelle Friend, University of Nebraska - Omaha
Angie Hodge, Northern Arizona University

Implementing Desmos Techtivities to Promote Students’ Covariational Reasoning

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Gary A. Olson, University of Colorado Denver
Heather Johnson, University of Colorado Denver
Jeremiah Kalir, University of Colorado Denver

The Effect of High School Reform on Students’ Mathematical Achievements: Evidence from China

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Sijia Li, Beijing National Day School
Galit Eizman, Harvard University

The Effects of Mathematical Mindset on the Future Implementation of Inquiry-Based Learning Methods by Pre-Service Elementary Teachers

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Julia St. Goar, Merrimack College
Yvonne Lai, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Knowing One’s Goals for an IBL Proofs Course

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Annie Selden, New Mexico State University
John Selden, New Mexico State University

Bits of IBL: Modules in the Journal of Inquiry Based Learning in Mathematics

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Theron J. Hitchman, University of Northern Iowa

Student Critique as an Inquiry-Based Practice

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Britney Hopkins, University of Central Oklahoma
Jake Khoury, Virginia Commonwealth University

Where Did That Come From?

5:10 p.m. - 5:25 p.m.
Clark Wells, Grand Valley State University

Supporting Students' Defining as a Mathematical Practice

5:30 p.m.- 5:45 p.m.
Brian P. Katz, Augustana College

Contributed Paper Session

Mastery Grading, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 5:05 p.m., Governor's Square 11, Plaza Building

“Mastery grading” refers to a suite of assessment techniques that encourage students to pursue deep understanding of course content. Techniques include standards-based grading, specifications grading, and mastery testing. Grades are based on mastery of objectives rather than accumulation of partial credit. Students have multiple attempts to attain this high standard for each objective, teaching them to persevere through the course.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Robert Campbell, College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University
Jeb Collins, University of Mary Washington
Alyssa Hoofnagle, Wittenberg University
Mike Janssen, Dordt College
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

Standards Based Grading adopted to Mathematics Courses

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Jason Elsinger, Florida Southern College
Drew Lewis, University of South Alabama

Mastery-Based Testing in Calculus: The Easiest Hard Test Questions

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Justin Wright, Plymouth State University

Mastery Based Grading in the Calculus Classroom: Increasing Rigor, Improving Transparency, and Empowering Student Success

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Sharona Krinsky, California State University Los Angeles

Redesigning Calculus I with Standards Based Grading and Active Learning with Technology

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Sharon Lanaghan, California State University, Dominguez Hills
Kristen Stagg, California State University, Dominguez Hills

Implementing Mastery-Based Quizzes and Tests in a Calculus Course

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
John Ross, Southwestern University

Using Mastery-Graded Homework to Promote Perseverance

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University

On Mastery Grading in Proofs-Based Classes

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Emma Wright, Plymouth State University

It's Binary: Using Mastery Grading to Motivate Students to Become Good Coders

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Bevin Maultsby, North Carolina State University

Using Specifications Grading to Improve Students' Proof Writing Skills

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Chad Wiley, Emporia State University

Mastery-Based Grading in a Senior Level Probability and Statistics Course

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Jacob Price, University of Puget Sound

Raising the Bar with Standards Based Grading

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Megan E. Selbach-Allen, Stanford University
Sarah J. Greenwald, Appalachian State University
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy
Jill Thomley, Appalachian State University

Contributed Paper Session

Priming the Calculus Pump: Fresh Approaches to Teaching First-Year Calculus, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 5:25 p.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building

Many first-year college calculus students have had a previous encounter with calculus in high school. These new college calculus students start calculus having seen much of the material, but with a weakness or a lack of confidence in some areas. This audience creates unique challenges to the instructor. This session seeks to share fresh approaches to engage this audience.

Organizers:
Chuck Garner, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology
Bob Sachs, George Mason University

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics (SIGMAA TAHSM)

Reconceptualizing the Integral and the Fundamental Theorem

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Robert Sachs, George Mason University

Interleaving Derivative Rules and Applications in Calculus I

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Melissa Lindsey, Dordt College

Enhancing a First-Year Calculus Course with Mathematica Assignments

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Jessica Kelly, Christopher Newport University

First Year Calculus with Python Coding

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Jiyeon Suh, Grand Valley State University

We Integrate Differentials, Not Functions

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Robert R. Rogers, SUNY Fredonia

RIP: Row Integration by Parts

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
John Rock, Cal Poly Pomona

Logs in Calculus and Maybe More.....

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Marshall Ransom, Georgia Southern University

Estimating Pi as an Introduction to Limits in Calculus I

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Eric Miles, Colorado Mesa University

A Necessary Condition for Priming the Calculus Pump: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Jack Bookman, Duke University
Michael Jacobson, University of Colorado Denver

Differentials, Not Derivatives

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Eugene Boman, Penn State, Harrisburg Campus

Math Placement at the Coast Guard Academy

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Eric C. Johnson, U.S. Coast Guard Academy

Implementing Modeling Practices in Calculus at a Hispanic-Serving Institution

5:10 p.m. - 5:25 p.m.
Adam Castillo, Florida International University
Charity Watson, Florida International University
Geoff Potvin, Florida International University
Laird Kramer, Florida International University

Contributed Paper Session

Ready or Not: Corequisite Courses and Just-in-Time Review

1:30 p.m. - 5:05 p.m., Governor's Square 17, Plaza Building

Many students enter college not yet ready for college-level mathematics. For some, embedded just-in-time review can fill in gaps, but for underprepared students many colleges and universities are showing greater success with “corequisite” courses to increase completion, especially for underserved populations. Talks describing the curricular change process are welcome, especially examples of successful responses to rapid large-scale implementation requirements.

Organizers: Rebecca Hartzler, University of Texas at Austin
Suzanne Dorée, Augsburg University
Frank Savina, University of Texas at Austin

Co-requisite Courses: The Right Math at the Right Time

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Francisco Savina, The University of Texas at Austin

Corequisite Implementation at Missouri Western State University

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Lori McCune, Missouri Western State University

Corequisite College Algebra at Illinois

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Alison Reddy, Univeristy of Illinois

Get AMPed About Corequisitie Courses

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Mary B. Walkins, The Community College of Baltimore County
Jesse Kiefner, The Community College of Baltimore County

Helping Developmental Students Enter into College Level Mathematics Courses

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Andy Richards, Central Washington University

College Algebra and Trigonometry Enhanced: A Co-Requisite Model with “Lab-Style” Explorations

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
K. Andrew Parker, NYC College of Technology

Peer Facilitator Led Support Courses for Precalculus

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Emily Gismervig, University of Washington Bothell
Cinnamon Hillyard, University of Washington Bothell

The Journey to Co-remediation

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Eileen C. McGraw, Stevenson University
Sarah G. Blanset, Stevenson University
Thairen G. Dade, Stevenson University

Just-In-Time Mathematics Support Using Online Modules: Findings from a Multi-Institutional Project

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Rachel Weir, Allegheny College
John Meier, Lafayette College

Meeting Students Where They Are: Supplemental Instruction in Large-Scale Quantitative Literacy Courses

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Samuel Luke Tunstall, Michigan State University
Becky Matz, Michigan State University

Making Waves in Math Placement

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Kathy Andrist, Utah Valley University

Using Corequisite Remediation to Overcome Barriers in Technology

5:10 p.m. - 5:25 p.m.
Nicholas Shay, Central Ohio Technical College

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, Gambling and Sports, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 5:25 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, gambling, and sports provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome.

Organizers: Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Mathematical Card Tricks

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Arthur Benjamin, Harvey Mudd College

New Card Trick: "Predicting the Finalists"

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Jang-Woo Park, University of Houston-Victoria
Ricardo Teixeira, University of Houston-Victoria

War, What Is It Good For?

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Robert Wolverton, US Air Force Academy

Using Games as a Context for Mathematical Modeling

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Jathan Austin, Salisbury University

Penney's Game with Strange Coins

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University

Markov Chains, Your Children, and You

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
David McCune, William Jewell College
Lori McCune, Missouri Western State University

Can Camels Compute Conditional Probability? An Analysis of Camel Up

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Thomas J. Clark, Dordt College

The Warden's Game: An Application of de Bruijn Sequences

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Joseph M. DiMuro, Biola University

The Vanishing Square Puzzle and the Fibonacci Sequence

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Stephen Andrilli, La Salle University

Sum Fun with Fibonacci and Friends

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Edmund A. Lamagna, University of Rhode Island
Robert A. Ravenscroft, Jr., Rhode Island College

A Covering Property for Digital Root Series

4:50 p.m. - 5:05 p.m.
Jeremiah Bartz, University of North Dakota

Exploring The "Reverse" Lucas Sequence 3, 1, 4, 5, 9, ...

5:10 p.m. - 5:25 p.m.
Jay L. Schiffman, Rowan University

Contributed Paper Session

Teaching Undergraduate Mathematics with Primary Historical Sources, Part A

1:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m., Governor's Square 12, Plaza Building

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in using primary historical sources to teach undergraduate mathematics. This approach has been used by a wide variety of faculty, including those with little background in mathematics history. This session brings together developers of materials for teaching with primary sources, instructors who teach with primary sources, and mathematics education researchers.

Organizers:
Dominic Klyve, Central Washington University
Maria Zack, Point Loma Nazarene University
Jeff Suzuki, Brooklyn College

Through the Looking Glass: Dodgson and Determinants

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Maria Zack, Point Loma Nazarene University

Modern Algebra—A Collection of Mathematical TRIUMPHS

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Adam Glesser, California State University, Fullerton

Mathematical Communication: the Unexpected Benefit of Using PHSs

2:10 pm. - 2:25 p.m.
Matthew Cathey, Wofford College

History of Math with Only Primary Sources

2:30 p.m.- 2:45 p.m.
Anne Duffee, Sewanee: the University of the South

Creating Calculus Projects Using Primary Sources

2:50 p.m.- 3:05 p.m.
Shawna Mahan, Pikes Peake Community College

Geometrical Approaches to Calculus Problems

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Andrew Leahy, Knox College

From History of Mathematics to Topics Courses

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Meagan C. Herald, Viginia Military Institute

Understanding Desargues in an Historical Context

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Carl Lienert, Fort Lewis College

Should We Call It the Abel-Dirichlet Theorem?

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
David Ruch, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Joshua Gonzales, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Ahern Nelson, Metropolitan State University of Denver

An Old Babylonian Procedure Text and a Table of Reciprocals

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Zoë Misiewicz, SUNY Oneonta and ISAW-NYU

Panel Session

Best Practices for Teaching Mathematics Online

1:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom F, Plaza Building

The MAA Professional Development Committee is sponsoring this panel discussion on best practices for teaching online. In this session panelists will share what has worked well for them, what needs to be improved, and what they would not do again. This session will have three panel members with each member having considerable experience in delivering online courses.

Organizer: Kyle Riley, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology

Panelists:
Radu Cascaval, University of Colorado Colorado Springs
Erica Hastert, Early College of Arvada
Linda Sundbye, Metropolitan State University of Denver

Sponsor: MAA Professional Development Committee

Workshop

Meeting the Challenge of Introducing Senior High School Students to Contemporary Mathematics

1:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m., Tower Court D, Tower Building

Consider the challenge mentioned in the title, why meet it and how? Our suggestion consists of periodically interweaving Mathematics-News-Snapshots (MNSs). We’ll examine a sample MNS against the rationale and the guidelines for MNS authors. Results from interweaving 21 different MNSs in Israel will be followed by a call for collaboration in (i) Developing new MNSs; (ii) Implementing existing MNSs empirically.

Organizers: Nitsa B. Movshovitz-Hadar and Boaz Silberman, Technion

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics (SIGMAA TAHSM)

Minicourse

Minicourse 1. Initiating, Designing, Building, and Using Modeling Scenarios for Teaching Differential Equations, Part B

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Tower Court A, Tower Building

We offer guidance and resources for developing materials for teaching differential equations using models. We discuss how to produce modeling scenarios and help participants focus on projects of their own. Sharing resources will assist participants in shaping their own modeling scenarios. Through active, hands-on, group work participating faculty will experience using modeling to teach differential equations from day one.

Brian Winkel, SIMIODE
Eric Sullivan, Carroll College
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University
Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University

Sponsor: Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE)

Minicourse

Minicourse 6. Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Tower Court B, Tower Building

We introduce hands-on, practical art puzzles that motivate the mathematics of projective geometry---the study of properties invariant under projective transformations. On the art side, we explore activities in perspective drawing or photography. These activities inform the mathematical side, where we introduce activities in problem solving and proof suitable for a sophomore-level proofs class. No artistic experience is required.

Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College
Fumiko Futamura, Southwestern University

Undergraduate Student Activity

The Case of the Missing Vertex

1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m., Grand Ballroom I, Tower Building

A vertex has gone missing in an un-labeled graph and taken all of its edges with it. Can we reconstruct the original graph, or at least some of its properties? What if we have the vertex-deleted graph for each of the vertices? Come join this mathematical investigation of the Graph Reconstruction Problem. This fanciful activity provides an introduction to Graph Theory and leads to an open question in the research. Bring a friend and writing utensil.

Presenter: Suzanne Dorée, Augsburg University

Other Mathematical Session

Alder Award Session

2:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom, A, B, & C, Plaza Building

The MAA established the Henry L. Alder Award for Distinguished Teaching by a Beginning College or University Mathematics Faculty Member to honor beginning college or university faculty members whose teaching has been extraordinarily successful and whose effectiveness in teaching undergraduate mathematics is shown to have influence beyond their own classrooms. Each year, at most three college or university teachers are honored with this national award. The awardees are invited to make a presentation in this session. The session is moderated by MAA President Deanna Haunsperger.

Creativity Amidst Adversity

2:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Mohamed Omar, Harvey Mudd College

Way to Fail!

3:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.
David Clark, Grand Valley State University,

Mathematics by Design

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Chad Awtrey, Elon University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

2:30 p.m. – 6:05 p.m., Plaza Courts 1-8, Plaza Building

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student paper Sessions

2:30 p.m. – 6:05 p.m., Plaza Courts 1-8, Plaza Building

Organizer:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Panel Session

Nonacademic Career Paths for Undergraduate Mathematics Majors

3:00 p.m. – 4:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom F, Plaza Building

You’re about to earn a degree in mathematics. Now what? You may be surprised to know that teaching isn’t your only option; in the “real world,” mathematical knowledge is a valued commodity, and there are many interesting job opportunities for mathematicians in nonacademic settings. Whether you are a mathematics student looking for a job once you graduate or an advisor looking for advice to give to future job-seeking students, this session will help you gain new perspectives on nonacademic career experiences and what employers value in their employees. Panelists will share their paths to their current positions and offer advice to others looking for employment in similar venues.

Organizers:
Pamela Richardson, Westminster College
Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University

Panelists:
Erin Valenti Bawa, Monticello Associates
Stephanie Fitchett, Transamerica
Emilie Purvine, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Tyler Rust, Fast Enterprises

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Undergraduate Student Activities (CUSA)

Poster Session

PosterFest 2018: Scholarship by Early Career Mathematicians

3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Plaza Exhibit Hall, Plaza Building

This poster session will allow early career mathematicians, including untenured faculty and graduate students, to present and discuss their scholarly activities with other attendees in an informal atmosphere. Examples of scholarly activities suitable for this poster session include expository work, preliminary reports, scholarship of teaching and learning, and research reports.

Organizers:
Eric A. Eager, University of Wisconsin La Crosse
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University

Sponsors:
MAA Committee on Early Career Mathematicians Young Mathematicians Network Project NExT

Workshop

Mathematical Puzzle Programs: Outreach and Recruitment with Puzzles

3:10 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Tower Court D, Tower Building

MaPP designs mathematical puzzlehunts for use in university outreach programs. Participating middle/high school students work in teams to solve fun mathematical puzzles based on contemporary mathematics research, many of which decode to locations around the host campus hiding more puzzles. Workshop participants will experience a mini-puzzlehunt for themselves and learn how to partner their institution with MaPP.

Organizers:
Braxton Carrigan, Southern Connecticut State University
Steven Clontz, University of South Alabama
PJ Couch, Lamar University

Minicourse

Minicourse 3. An Introduction to WeBWorK: An Open Source Alternative for Generating and Delivering Online Homework Problems, Part A

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Tower Court A, Tower Building

Participants will learn to utilize the opensource online homework system WeBWorK. Adopted by over 1200 institutions, WeBWorK includes an extensive, curated library of over 35,000 exercises encompassing the collegiate curriculum. Subjects include College Algebra, Calculus, ODEs, Linear Algebra, Statistics, and Introduction to Proofs. Participants will learn how to utilize WeBWorK in their classrooms and to edit WeBWorK exercises.

John Travis, Mississippi College
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education (CTiME)

Minicourse

Minicourse 4. Leading a Successful Program Review, Part A

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Tower Court B, Tower Building

Designed for faculty members preparing to lead program reviews in the next year or so, this mini-course covers the reasons for undertaking a program, how to write the self-study, the role of an external consultant, pitfalls that one might anticipate and how to avoid them. The mini-course will also interest faculty who are willing to serve as an external consultant.

Rick Gillman, Valparaiso University
Henry Walker, Grinnell College

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Departmental Reviews

Panel Session

Using Your MAA Departmental Membership

Friday, August 3, 4:30 p.m. - 5:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom F, Plaza Building

The relatively new MAA Departmental Membership allows member departments to give free student memberships to as many students as they wish. But once all your students are members, what do you do? We will explore how departments are using MAA resources with their student members to enrich teaching, create Math Club activities, generate capstone experiences, and more.

Organizer: Kira Hamman, Penn State Mont Alto

Panelists:
Ximena Catepillan, Millersville University
Diane Davis, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Joyati Debnath, Winona State University
Larry Gratton, Berea College
Fernando Gouvea, Colby College

Sponsor: MAA Membership Committee

SIGMAA Activity

IBL SIGMAA Guest Lecture

6:00 p.m. – 6:50 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

Inspire through Inquiry-Based Learning

Angie Hodge, Northern Arizona University

Inquiry-based learning has been shown to help all students learn mathematics, but IBL has a powerful component that goes beyond the mathematics classroom. IBL can help students with developing thinking skills, making informed life choices, building lifelong relationships, and opening doors to career paths not otherwise considered. In this session, I will engage the audience in a reflective session on how we can all inspire others by using IBL methods of teaching in our classrooms.

Social Event

Pi Mu Epsilon Banquet

6:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m., Grand Ballroom I, Tower Building

All PME members and their supporters are welcome. See the registration form for more information on this ticketed event.

SIGMAA Activity

WEB SIGMAA Business Meeting

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Governor's Square 10, Plaza Building

SIGMAA Activity

IBL SIGMAA Reception and Business Meeting

7:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

Other Mathematical Session

Uniform Convergence: A One-Woman Play

8:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., Plaza Ballroom F, Plaza Building

Uniform Convergence is a one-woman play, written and performed by mathematics graduate student Corrine Yap. It juxtaposes the stories of two women trying to find their place in a white male-dominated academic world. The first is of historical Russian mathematician Sofia Kovalevskaya, who was lauded as a pioneer for women in science but only after years of struggle for recognition. Her life's journey is told through music and movement, in both Russian and English. The second is of a fictional Asian-American woman, known only as "Professor," attempting to cope with the prejudice she faces in the present. As she teaches an introductory real analysis class, she uses mathematical concepts to draw parallels to the race and gender conflicts she encounters in society today.

Session for Undergraduate Students

MAA Ice Cream Social

9:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m., North Convention Lobby, Tower Building

Besides cake and ice cream, we will recognize all students who gave talks in the MAA Student Paper Sessions, and award prizes for the best of them. All are invited.


Saturday, August 4

Registration

8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Plaza Registration, Plaza Building

Exhibit Hall

9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Plaza Exhibit Hall, Plaza Building

Invited Address

MAA James R.C. Leitzel Lecture

The Relationship between Culture and the Learning of Mathematics

9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Talitha Washington, Howard University and National Science Foundation

How do we ensure that our mathematics is culturally inclusive? Why have issues with minority participation not been resolved? Unfortunately, even with our best intentions, our implicit biases impact the mathematics we teach and learn. We all can take an active role to ensure the strength of our future mathematical community, which should also be a reflection of our Nation. I will share how to infuse various cultures in learning mathematics that can better help educate those of diverse backgrounds which will broaden the participation of those doing mathematics.

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching, Part C

9:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., Governor's Square 14, Plaza Building

Inquiry-Based Learning approaches seek to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of inquiry-based methods for teaching and learning.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, Augustana College
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Candice Price, University of San Diego
Xiao Xiao, Utica College
Amanda H. Matson, Clarke University
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University
Kayla Dwelle, Ouachita Baptist University
Phong Le, Goucher College

Improving Student Learning in Multivariable Calculus through Research Projects

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Na Yu, Lawrence Technological University

Calculus 1 + IBL + January term =

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Joe Benson, Macalester College

Encouraging STEM Student Self-Consciousness about “English-Units”

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Ann L. Von Mehren, Bowling Green State University

Overcoming Resistance to Inquiry-Based Learning in a Math for Liberal Arts Class

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Benjamin Gaines, Iona College

Assessment Projects in an IBL Proofs Course

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Martha Byrne, Sonoma State University

Supporting Unconfident Proof Writers in IBL Euclidean Geometry

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
David Clark, Grand Valley State University

Matrix Representations as a Gateway to Group Theory

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Paul E. Becker, Penn State Behrend
Mark Medwid, Rhode Island College

Teaching Number Theory From Scratch

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Ian Whitehead, Macalester College

Discovery Learning in an Interdisciplinary Course on Finite Fields and Applications

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Christopher ONeill, San Diego State University
Lily Silverstein, University of California Davis

A Technique to Discover the Cauchy-Euler Equation While Reviewing Differential Calculus

12:00 p.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Jonathan Weisbrod, Rowan College at Burlington County

Contributed Paper Session

Priming the Calculus Pump: Fresh Approaches to Teaching First-Year Calculus, Part C

9:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building

Many first-year college calculus students have had a previous encounter with calculus in high school. These new college calculus students start calculus having seen much of the material, but with a weakness or a lack of confidence in some areas. This audience creates unique challenges to the instructor. This session seeks to share fresh approaches to engage this audience.

Organizers:
Chuck Garner, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology
Bob Sachs, George Mason University

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics (SIGMAA TAHSM)

Modeling with Calculus: the Practical and the Whimsical

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Emma Smith Zbarsky, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Gary Simundza, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Modeling the Physical World: An Integrated Math and Physics Course

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Nathan Pennington, Creighton University

Ximera and Calculus Coordination

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
James M. Talamo, The Ohio State University
Nela Lakos, The Ohio State University

Personalizing Placement with a Multi-Faceted Approach

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Paul N. Runnion, Missouri University of Science and Technology
Stephanie L. Fitch, Missouri University of Science and Technology

Connected With Calculus: Building Community Online

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Jennifer Elyse Clinkenbeard, CSU Channel Islands, CSU Monterey Bay
Cynthia Wyels, CSU Channel Islands

The Effect of Flipping Calculus on Attitudes, Behaviors, and Performance

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Trefor Bazett, University of Cincinnati

A Flipped Classroom Approach to a Summer Calculus Course

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Daniel Watson, Mississippi College

Calculus - Twice Flipped

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Ann Marie Harmon, Brigham Young University - Idaho

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, Gambling and Sports, Part C

9:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, gambling, and sports provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome.

Organizers: Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

The Continuing Saga of the Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Jason Rosenhouse, James Madison University

Knights and Knaves and Naive Set Theory

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Oscar Levin, University of Northern Colorado
Tyler Markkanen, Springfield College

Open Problems in the Game of Lazy Cops and Robbers on Graphs

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Brendan W. Sullivan, Emmanuel College

A Spectrum of Solutions for a Set of Cyclic Groupdoku

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
David Nacin, William Paterson University

Using Games for Teaching Mathematical Concepts

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Guoan Diao, Holy Family University

Evaluating Hackenbush Positions

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Paul Olson, Penn State Erie, Behrend

Fractal Tiling Puzzles

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Michael Barnsley, Australian National University
Andrew Vince, Australian National University
Louisa Barnsley, Australian National University

Challenging Knight's Tours

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Sam K. Miller, Harvey Mudd College
Arthur T. Benjamin, Harvey Mudd College

Session for Undergraduate Students

MAA Mathematical Competition in Modeling (MCM) Winners

9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m., Grand Ballroom I, Tower Building

About 20,000 teams, each consisting of three undergraduates, entered the 2018 Mathematical Contest in Modeling in February. Teams chose one of two real-world problems. Teams have four days to deal with the MCM challenge and may use or access any inanimate source – computers, libraries, the Web, etc. MAA judges choose a winner for each problem. The two MAA winning teams of students will present their results of the MCM four-day challenge.

Organizer:
Ben Fusaro, Florida State University

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Nonlinear Dispersive Equations and the Beautiful Mathematics That Comes with Them, Lecture III

10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Gigliola Staffilani, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

In these lectures I will give an overview of the rich mathematical structures that characterize the wave solutions of some of the most important nonlinear partial differential equations, such as the Schrödinger equation. In doing so I will illustrate how beautiful pieces of mathematics, developed using different tools, not just coming from analysis, have been generated over the years in order to answer some of the most fundamental questions for these equations, such as existence and uniqueness of solutions for example. Along the way I will formulate open questions and possible new directions of investigation.

Other Mathematical Session

Math Teachers' Circle Demonstration

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Majestic Ballroom, Tower Building

A Math Teachers' Circle is a professional development experience that brings mathematics professionals in direct contact with teachers. Circles foster passion and excitement for deep mathematics and give teachers a chance to connect with like-minded colleagues. This demonstration session offers the opportunity for conference attendees to observe and then discuss a Math Teachers' Circle experience designed for local teachers. While the teachers are engaged in a mathematical investigation, mathematicians will have a discussion focused on appreciating and better understanding the organic and creative process of learning that circles offer, and on the logistics and dynamics of running an effective circle.

Organizers:
Laura Janssen and Tom Clark, Dordt College

Sponsor: The SIGMAA for Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA-MCST)

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

Snow Business: Scientific Computing in the Movies and Beyond

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m., Plaza Ballroom A, B, & C, Plaza Building

Joseph Teran, University of California Los Angeles

New applications of scientific computing for solid and fluid mechanics problems include simulation of virtual materials in movie visual effects and virtual surgery. Both disciplines demand physically realistic dynamics for materials like water, smoke, fire, and soft tissues. New algorithms are required for each area. Teran will speak about the simulation techniques required in these fields and will share some recent results including: simulated surgical repair of biomechanical soft tissues; extreme deformation of elastic objects with contact; high resolution incompressible flow; and clothing and hair dynamics. He will also discuss a new algorithm used for simulating the dynamics of snow in Disney’s animated feature film, “Frozen”.

Committee Meeting

MAA Business Meeting

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom D, Plaza Building

The meeting is organized by MAA Secretary James Sellers, Penn State University, and is chaired by MAA President Deanna Haunsperger, Carleton College.

Contributed Paper Session

Modeling-Based Teaching and Learning in Differential Equations Courses

1:00 p.m. - 4:55 p.m., Governor's Square 15, Plaza Building

This session features talks about modeling-based teaching in differential equations courses and descriptions of modeling activities in a course from speakers who are beginning to use modeling and those with more experience. Talks featuring real data (collected or cited) and a full modeling process for students are offered. Evidence of the success of individual approaches will be given.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, Director SIMIODE
Lisa Driskell, Associate Professor of Mathematics at Colorado Mesa University
Audrey Malagon, Batten Associate Professor of Mathematics, Virginia Wesleyan University

Air Water Rocket as Class Project

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
John T. Sieben, Texas Lutheran University
Reza Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University

It's Close to Rocket Science

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Gerard Ornas, McNeese State University

A Boundary Value Problem Modeling-Exercise: Beam Equation

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Jim Fischer, Oregon Institute of Technology
Tiernan Fogarty, Oregon Institute of Technology

Estimation of the Thermal Properties of a Wall using Temperature and Heat Flux Measurements

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Marco Scavino, Universidad de la República
Marco Iglesias, University of Nottingham
Zaid Sawlan, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
Raúl Tempone, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
Christopher Wood, University of Nottingham

The Past, Present, and Future of Endangered Whale Populations

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Glenn Ledder, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Modeling with Differential Equations (MA153) Course Changes and Project Ideas

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Ryan Miller, United States Military Academy

Coexistence and Competition

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Jean Marie Linhart, Central Washington University
Daniel Roelke, Texas A&M University

Modeling, Team Based Computer Lab Materials in Differential Equations: Implementation and Outcomes

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Peter G. LaRose, University of Michigan

Discrete-Space Continuous-Time and Discrete-Time Continuous-Space Modeling

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Namyong Lee, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Sequential Course Activities Constructing a One Predator Two Prey Model Incorporating an Allee Threshold and Indirect Prey-Prey Effects

4:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Christopher Brown, California Lutheran University

Dynamics of Gestational Diabetes: A Model-Based Analysis

4:20 p.m. - 4:35 p.m.
Hasala Senpathy K. Gallolu Kankanamalage, Roger Williams University

Maxima Modeling for Differential Equations

4:40 p.m. - 4:55 p.m.
Leon Kaganovskiy, Touro College Brooklyn Campus

Graduate Student Paper Session

Great Talks for a General Audience: Coached Presentations by Graduate Students

1:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Governor's Square 9 & 10, Plaza Building

In this session graduate students give talks aimed at an undergraduate audience. Both the talks and abstracts should be designed to excite a wide range of undergraduates about mathematics.

Organizers:
Jim H. Freeman, Cornell College
May Mei, Denison University
Ranjan Rohatgi, Saint Mary's College
Aliza Steurer, Dominican University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Graduate Students

Invited Paper Session

Category Theory for All

1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom D, Plaza Building

Category theory can be thought of as being "very abstract algebra". It is typically taught at graduate school or in some select cases to advanced undergraduates. In this session we will show ways in which category theory can be taught in a meaningful way to undergraduates and those without particularly aptitude or expertise in math, even high school and middle school students. In the process, we will emphasize important aspects of mathematics that are not to do with solving problems, proving theorems, or getting the right answer, including: making connections between different situations, illuminating deep structures, finding fundamental reasons for things, and improving the clarity of our thinking. The talks will be of interest for general enrichment as well as pedagogy.

Organizer:
Eugenia Cheng, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Making Distinctions: Interpreting the Notion of Sameness

1:30 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Alissa Crans, Loyola Marymount University

Social Choice and Functoriality

2:15 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Sarah Yeakel, University of Maryland

Unifying Different Worlds in Mathematics

3:00 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Angélica Osorno, Reed College

From Arithmetic to Category Theory

3:45 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Emily Riehl, Johns Hopkins University

Invited Paper Session

Strategies to Synergize Culture in the Learning and Doing of Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 3:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom E, Plaza Building

How do we embed various cultures into the learning and doing of mathematics? What are the ways that we can enhance the learning of mathematics through culturally-responsive teaching? Mathematics grounded in the African American, Latinx, and Native American traditions as well as other international traditions can stimulate connections and a sense of belonging in the mathematical community. Presenters will provide implementable strategies to synergize culture in the learning and the doing of mathematics. By infusing various cultures into our mathematics, we enhance the learning experience as well as broaden the inclusion of those doing mathematics.

Organizer:
Talitha Washington, Howard University and the National Science Foundation

Importance of Culture in Indigenous Learning of Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Bob Megginson, University of Michigan

Using Computer Modeling to Integrate Culture & Mathematics

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Jacqueline Leonard

Diary of a Black Mathematician: From Research I to Liberal Arts

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Edray Goins, Pomona College

Rehumanizing Mathematics: Should That Be Our Goal?

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Rochelle Gutiérrez, University of Illinois

Contributed Paper Session

The Capstone Experience for Mathematics Majors

1:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m., Governor's Square 16, Plaza Building

Capstone experiences vary from research, service, and artistic projects, to oral or written exams, to study abroad, internships, and more. Come and share your experiences and learn what others are doing with culminating experiences for Mathematics majors. We encourage the submission of scholarly work including but not limited to original research, innovative ideas, projects, curricular materials, assessment models, etc.

Oranizers:
Jacci White, Monika Kiss, and Kevin Murphy, Saint Leo University

Contracts and Assessment of Senior Projects

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Jacci White, Saint Leo University

The Capstone Experience: An Individualized Approach

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Leslie Jones, University of Tampa

Ten years of Math Capstone “for all” at the Air Force Academy

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Ian Pierce, US Air Force Academy
Beth Schaubroeck, US Air Force Academy

Is 2+1 Better than 3? Examining Morehead State's Two-Semester Senior Capstone

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Doug Chatham, Morehead State University

The Long and Winding Research Project

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Michael Brilleslyper, U. S. Air Force Academy
Ethan Berkove, Lafayette College

Investigate, Review, and Present: A Capstone Experience

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Karen B. Stanish, Keene State College

Writing Someone Else's Senior Exam

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Kevin Murphy, Saint Leo University

Contributed Paper Session

Mastery Grading, Part C

1:30 p.m. - 3:05 p.m., Governor's Square 11, Plaza Building

“Mastery grading” refers to a suite of assessment techniques that encourage students to pursue deep understanding of course content. Techniques include standards-based grading, specifications grading, and mastery testing. Grades are based on mastery of objectives rather than accumulation of partial credit. Students have multiple attempts to attain this high standard for each objective, teaching them to persevere through the course.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Robert Campbell, College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University
Jeb Collins, University of Mary Washington
Alyssa Hoofnagle, Wittenberg University
Mike Janssen, Dordt College
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

Factors Affecting Student Participation in Voluntary Reassessments in SBG

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Drew Lewis, University of South Alabama

Tools to Facilitate Mastery Grading

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Steven Clontz, University of South Alabama

Alternative Assessment Methods: Five Years In

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Joshua Bowman, Pepperdine University

Do Students Get It? SBG Implementation at Three Levels of the Curriculum

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Rebecca E. Gasper, Creighton University

Preparing Introductory Math Students For What Comes Next: Using High Stakes Quizzes Early (And Often)

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
John Prather, Ohio University

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula

1:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m., Governor's Square 17, Plaza Building

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers: Tim Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Sweet Briar College

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA)

Quantitative Biology: An Alternative to Calculus for Biology Majors

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Margaret Rahmoeller, Roanoke College

First-year Calculus Workshops using Biology Lab Data

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Harry F. Hoke, University of Richmond
Kathy W. Hoke, University of Richmond

Reports on the Attitudes of Students in Calculus of Life Science toward Mathematics in Their Careers

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Yanping Ma, Loyola Marymount University

A Pathway from Introductory Material to Undergraduate Research in Mathematical Biology

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Timothy D. Comar, Benedictine University

Incorporating Biology Topics into Mathematics Undergraduate Experiences

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Emma K. Groves, North Carolina State University

Mathematical Analysis of Oscillatory Network of Transcriptional Regulators as a Course Project

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Kseniya Fuhrman, Milwaukee School of Engineering

Contributed Paper Session

Teaching Undergraduate Mathematics with Primary Historical Sources, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 4:05 p.m., Governor's Square 12, Plaza Building

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in using primary historical sources to teach undergraduate mathematics. This approach has been used by a wide variety of faculty, including those with little background in mathematics history. This session brings together developers of materials for teaching with primary sources, instructors who teach with primary sources, and mathematics education researchers.

Organizers:
Dominic Klyve, Central Washington University
Maria Zack, Point Loma Nazarene University
Jeff Suzuki, Brooklyn College

An Activity on Letter Correspondence in the History of Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Matthew Haines, Augsburg University

Developing a Growth Mindset using TRIUMPHS PSPs

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Edward Bonan-Hamada, Colorado Mesa University

Beyond Just Doing the Math: An Investigation of the Role of Primary Source Projects in Supporting Student Learning of the Meta-Discursive Rules of Mathematics

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Janet Heine Barnett, Colorado State University - Pueblo
Cihan Can, Florida State University
Kathleen Clark, Florida State University

Implementing Primary Source Projects Using Overleaf, a Latex Platform in the Cloud

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Kenneth M. Monks, Front Range Community College - Boulder County Campus

Bridging the Sciences and the Humanities with Primary Historical Sources

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Abe Edwards, Michigan State University

Supplementing the History of Mathematics with Original Sources

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Dan Kemp, South Dakota State University

Learning Mathematics through Historical Projects

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Qin Yang, MSU Denver

The Radius of Curvature According to Christiaan Huygens

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Jerry M. Lodder, New Mexico State University

Town Hall Session

Quantitative Literacy Swap Session

1:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m., Plaza Ballroom F, Plaza Building

In this swap session, participants will have the opportunity to share or borrow course materials related to quantitative literacy. We interpret course materials to include data sets, technology, individual lessons, case studies, entire courses, etc. At the beginning of the session, participants will sign up to give a brief (5 minutes or less) presentation of their resource. Come to share, come to receive, or come for both!

Organizers:
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Catherine Crockett, Point Loma Nazarene University
Andrew Miller, Belmont University
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Luke Tunstall, Michigan State University

Sponsor: The SIGMAA on Quantitative Literacy (SIGMAA QL)

Minicourse

Minicourse 2. Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning, Part B

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Tower Court A, Tower Building

This minicourse will be a hands-on introduction to inquiry-based learning, a pedagogical approach that strongly emphasizes active learning and sense-making. Facilitators and participants will model IBL classroom modes as teachers and students and analyze on these experiences so that participants can integrate these modes into their teaching practice. The minicourse is intended for instructors new to inquiry-based learning.

Brian P Katz, Augustana College
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Candice Price, University of San Diego
Xiao Xiao, Utica College
Alison Marr, Southwestern University

Sponsor: The SIGMAA for Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Minicourse

Minicourse 5. Mathematical Card Magic, Part B

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Tower Court B, Tower Building

A survey of modern self-working mathematical card magic, including original principles and effects shared online in the Card Colm blog (2004-2014) at MAA.org. A special feature will be two-person card magic based on subtle mathematical communication principles. The material can be used to liven up mathematics classes and motivate student learning. The only prerequisite is curiosity.

Colm Mulcahy, Spelman College

Other Mathematical Session

Special Interactive Presentation for High School Students, Parents, and Teachers

FREAKY FIXED POINTS

1:30 p.m. – 2:20 p.m., Majestic Ballroom, Tower Building

If you open up a map of the US while standing in the US, might there be a point on the paper sitting precisely at the location it represents? If you stir your (mathematically ideal) cup of coffee in the morning, does every point of liquid change location? If you crumple a piece of paper, does every point on it move?

Let’s play games with triangles to discover the freaky existence of fixed points!

Leader: James Tanton, Mathematical Association of America
Organizer: Elgin Johnston, Iowa State University

Sponsor: MAA Council on Outreach

Other Mathematical Session

Creating New Mathematical Futures: A Study of Gender Equity in Mathematics Competitions

1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m., Grand Ballroom I, Tower Building

MCM/ICM is an alternative to traditional mathematics competitions and has achieved very different results, with an impressive 42% of participants being women. This progress toward gender equity prompted a research study examining the features of the environment that contribute to the participation of women. Researchers highlight the opportunities that MCM/ICM affords women to experience mathematics in different and powerful ways.

Organizers:
Jo Boaler, Stanford University
Sol Garfunkel, Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP)

Session for Undergraduate Students

Student Problem Solving Competition

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Grand Ballroom II, Tower Building

This event is the finals of the Problem Solving Competition. Universities and colleges that participate monthly on their own campuses by holding problem solving contests are invited to send a contestant. Each contestant will be required to solve a series of mathematical problems. Based on the outcome, a champion along with 2nd through 6th place winners will be named.

Organizer:
Richard Neal, American Society for the Communication of Mathematics

Other Mathematical Session

MATH Rumble

2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Majestic Ballroom, Tower Building

The Math Rumble involves teachers in a Mathematical Creativity Contest including mathematical and pedagogical questions. The intention of the Math Rumble demonstration at Math Fest is to share a fun mathematical contest format with those who lead Math Teachers' Circles and similar activities.

Organizers:
Ed Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno
Phil Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Paul Zeitz, University of San Francisco

Sponsor: The SIGMAA for Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA-MCST)

Town Hall Session

Shaping and Fostering an Equitable Community in our Departments

Saturday, August 4, 3:00 p.m. – 4:20 p.m., Plaza Ballroom F, Plaza Building

The goal of this session is to compile a list of best practices for creating and sustaining an equitable department community. Small groups of participants, each led by a moderator, will brainstorm creative solutions to address a variety of questions and concerns regarding department habits and in all types of departments. The outcomes of the Town Hall will be published in the AWM Newsletter, MAA Focus, and the Notices.

Organizers:
Alejandra Alvarado, Eastern Illinois University
Candice Price, University of San Diego
Alissa Crans, Loyola Marymount University
Jackie Jensen-Vallin, Lamar University

Minicourse

Minicourse 3. An Introduction to WeBWorK: An Open Source Alternative for Generating and Delivering Online Homework Problems, Part B

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Tower Court A, Tower Building

Participants will learn to utilize the opensource online homework system WeBWorK. Adopted by over 1200 institutions, WeBWorK includes an extensive, curated library of over 35,000 exercises encompassing the collegiate curriculum. Subjects include College Algebra, Calculus, ODEs, Linear Algebra, Statistics, and Introduction to Proofs. Participants will learn how to utilize WeBWorK in their classrooms and to edit WeBWorK exercises.

John Travis, Mississippi College
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education (CTiME)

Minicourse

Minicourse 4. Leading a Successful Program Review, Part B

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Tower Court B, Tower Building

Designed for faculty members preparing to lead program reviews in the next year or so, this mini-course covers the reasons for undertaking a program, how to write the self-study, the role of an external consultant, pitfalls that one might anticipate and how to avoid them. The mini-course will also interest faculty who are willing to serve as an external consultant.

Rick Gillman, Valparaiso University
Henry Walker, Grinnell College

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Departmental Reviews

 

Year: 
2018

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