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Chronological Schedule

Wednesday, July 31

Committee Meeting

MAA Congress Meeting

8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Rosewood Room

Registration & Information

3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom Lobby

Session for Undergraduate Students

MAA-PME Student Reception

4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., DECC 200

Undergraduate students are invited to come for refreshments and a welcome to MathFest.

Session for Undergraduate Students

Math Jeopardy

5:30 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Rooms 206

Answer: A fun undergraduate mathematics contest to lead off MathFest.
Question: What is Mathematics Jeopardy?

Four teams of students will provide the questions to go with the mathematical answers in many categories. All interested students in the audience can enter their names to be chosen to play on one of the four teams of four players. There will be prizes for all the participants.

Come cheer for your favorite team. The session will be emceed by Michael Berry.

Organizers:
Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University
Michael W. Berry, University of Tennessee

Social Event

Exhibit Hall & Grand Opening Reception

6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom B

The MAA MathFest Grand Opening Reception will launch this year's MAA MathFest on a high note. This event is intended to draw attendees together in a spirit of camaraderie. We warmly invite you to enjoy complimentary light hors d'oeuvres while you mix and mingle in the Exhibit Hall with other registered participants and guests, sponsors, and exhibitors.

Invited Address

Pi Mu Epsilon J. Sutherland Frame Lecture

Alice in Numberland --- Adventures in Cryptography, Number Theory, and Life

8:00 p.m. - 8:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Alice Silverberg, University of California, Irvine

I will give an account of some of my adventures in the wonderlands of mathematics and cryptography, offering some food for thought on how mathematics can be useful in cryptography, and mentioning some useful things I learned along the way that I wish I had learned sooner.


Thursday, August 1

Registration & Information

8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom Lobby

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

8:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Rooms 210, 211, 235, 251

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

8:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Rooms 205, 234, 236, 264

Pi Mu Epsilon student members who wish to represent their chapters as student speakers or official delegates should visit the PME website at http://pme-math.org/ for more information.

Please note: all student presenters are required to be registered for MAA MathFest.

Organizer: Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Exhibit Hall

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom B

MAA Invited Address

Uncertainty: The Mathematics of What we Don’t Know

9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Ami Radunskaya, Pomona College

Over the past few centuries, the theory of probability has been developed to quantify possibilities and to help us make decisions with incomplete knowledge. More recently, this theory has been refined to include predictions based on randomly perturbed dynamical systems, as well as providing a measure of our belief in future events based on observed data. As mathematicians, we like precision, patterns, predictions. As human beings we want to make wise, informed decisions. In this talk I will explore three questions: how can we quantify the uncertainty in our predictions, how do we make decisions in the face of uncertainty, and when is a bit of uncertainty helpful … or fun?

Contributed Paper Session

Plug and Play Data Science Lessons, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 10:40 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 233

In this session, papers include data science lessons that attendees can seamlessly incorporate into courses such as Finite Math, Calculus, Linear Algebra, Discrete Mathematics, Mathematical Modeling, and others. Presentations include such elements as an overview of the lesson, student learning objectives, assessments, and a summary of the effectiveness of the lesson if available.

Organizers:
Michael Boardman, Pacific University
Timothy Chartier, Davidson College
Jason Douma, University of Sioux Falls

Sponsor:
Committee for the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM)

Teaching Elements of Machine Learning in A Quantitative Reasoning Course

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Mutiara Sondjaja, New York University

A Climate Data Set in Applied Calculus

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Andrew S. Leahy, Knox College

Modeling Regional Bird Count Data in Calculus I and Differential Equations

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Christopher Brown, California Lutheran University

Teaching Riemann Sums and Multiple Integration with Messy Data

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Drew C. Youngren, Columbia University

Querying An Open Sports Database for Research and Education

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Megan Olivia Powell, University of North Carolina Asheville

Contributed Paper Session

History of Mathematics in a Math Circle, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 10:40 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 237 & 238

During this session, presenters will share mathematical topics and problems of a historical nature for use in a math circle. This can include such ideas as, but not limited to, working a class of problems using historical methods, discovering methods of calculation from a former time or culture, discovering how mathematical concepts were discovered or used historically or culturally.

Organizers:
Amy Shell-Gellasch, Eastern Michigan University
Philip Yasskin, Texas A&M University

Sponsors:
SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)
The History of Mathematics SIGMAA (HOM SIGMAA)

Cryptography

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Seongchun Kwon, University of Central Florida

Red Rock Math Circle (R2MC)

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Jie Liu, Dixie State University
Clare Banks, Dixie State University
Vinodh Chellamuthu, Dixie State University

Geometry Machines in Greek Antiquity

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Viktor Blasjo, Utrecht University

Multiplication with Ancient Chinese Rod Numerals

10:00 a.m.- 10:15 a.m.
Amy Shell-Gellasch, Eastern Michigan University

Drafting Japanese Crest Designs in a Math Circle activity for High School Teachers

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Felicia Tabing, University of Southern California

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 10:40 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 230 & 231

Inquiry-based learning (IBL) transforms students from consumers to producers of mathematics. IBL methods aim to develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and processes by putting students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use and effects of IBL methods for teaching and learning.

Organizers:
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Susan Crook, Loras College
Brian Katz, Augustana College
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy

Sponsor:
The SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Mission: Possible - A Whole Class REU Project?!

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Min-Lin Lo, California State University, San Bernardino

Proof Bridges

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University

Fundamentals of Teaching Fundamentals of Mathematical Proof

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Kayla B. Dwelle, Ouachita Baptist University

Writing and Implementing a Set of Rings-First IBL Course Notes

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Melissa Lindsey, Dordt University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University

Computational IBL in Number Theory

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
John Asplund, Dalton State College

Contributed Paper Session

Enhance Your Teaching through Best Practices That Align with the Instructional Practices Guide, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 10:40 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 260, 261, & 262

Speakers in this session share teaching innovations through a scholarly lens by pegging their work to specific evidence-based practices in the MAA Instructional Practices (IP) Guide. Each talk will clearly lay out both the pedagogical technique as well as how it pertains to at least one of the subsections of the IP Guide.

Organizers:
Carolyn A. Yackel, Mercer University
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University

Sponsor:
Committee on the Teaching of Undergraduate Mathematics (CTUM)

Guided Explorations in College Geometry

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
William Fenton, Bellarmine University

A Comparison of Homework vs. Exam Averages, or What Kind of Homework Assignments Work Best?

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Eric C. Johnson, U.S. Coast Guard Academy

Calculus III TEAM Activities: Success of Modified Peer Instruction

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Alan Von Herrmann, University of Tennessee

Teaching Calculus with SageMath Widgets

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Yuanting Lu, Department of Mathematics, Mercer University
Jeff Denny, Department of Mathematics, Mercer University

Implementing Mastery Grading in Calculus 2

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Nora Strasser, Friends University

Contributed Paper Session

Math + X: Mathematics Courses, Curriculum, and Projects Serving Professional Disciplines, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 232

Mathematics departments have provided content supporting partner and professional disciplines for decades. For disciplines such as business and engineering, numerous resources support a contextualized curriculum. This session highlights curricular elements for professions, disciplines, and math pathways where supporting materials for contextualized student learning are lacking. Of particular interest are successful examples of nontraditional curricula that match students’ future work environment.

Organizers:
Francisco Savina, Charles A. Dana Center, University of Texas at Austin
Stuart Boersma, Central Washington University

Mathematics and Nursing: Narrowing the Classroom-Practice Gap with Authentic Dosage Activities

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Daniel Ozimek, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Lindsay Good, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Gayle Watson, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Anna Wendel, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

Innovative Pathways in STEM Teacher Preparation

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Thomas J. Clark, Dordt College

In-context, Small Project Based Delivery of a Basic Statistics Course for Nursing, Physical Therapy and Allied Health Students

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Katherine Radler, Saint Louis University
Kimberly Druschel, Saint Louis University
Michael May, Saint Louis University
Sadita Salihovic, Saint Louis University

Data-Driven Design: A course on Data Analysis for Entrepreneurs

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Benjamin C. Gaines, Iona College

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 10:40 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 207 & 208

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Timothy D. Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Sweet Briar College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA)

Modeling Calculus: A First Course for Everyone Including Biology Majors

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg College

Mathematical Modeling and Applied Calculus

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College

Linking Introductory Mathematics Courses to the Life Sciences

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Bori Mazzag, Humboldt State University

Mathematical Modeling for the Life Sciences: A Curricular Update

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Douglas Norton, Villanova University

Strengthening the STEM Curriculum through the Introduction of an Undergraduate Quantitative Bio-track Program

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Sanjukta Hota, Fisk University

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, Gambling and Sports, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 10:40 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 206

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, gambling, and sports provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates or examples of the use of the solutions of these problems in the undergraduate classroom are encouraged.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (Rec SIGMAA)

Exploring and Extending the Impossible Card Location Trick

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Samantha Pezzimenti, Penn State Brandywine

Guess My Birthday - An Original Mathematical Magic Trick

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Jon Stadler, Capital University

Five Card Study: A Magic Divination

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Jeremiah Paul Farrell, Butler University

A Factorial Card Trick

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Tom Edgar, Pacific Lutheran University

Buffon's Needle and Coin Problems on Hyperspheres

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Daniel Pritikin, Miami University
Nathaniel Coffin, Miami University

Workshop

Create and Recreate: A Celebration of Women in Recreational Mathematics

9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 201

Recreational mathematics is an area of active research, and one that has the potential to draw undergraduate researchers into mathematics research. In this hands-on workshop, a variety of women working in recreational mathematics will introduce participants to topics that have the potential to lead to research projects both for the participants and their students.The workshop is AWM sponsored and the primary target audience is female mathematicians, but of course, anyone can attend the workshop.

Organizers:
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Emelie Kenney, Siena College
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Sarah Wolff, Denison University

Minicourse

Minicourse 3. Game Theoretic Modeling for Math Majors, Part A

9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom A

Mathematical modeling bridges the distance between the real world in which we operate and the abstract world that provides guiding structures. We use game theory as a mathematical tool when modeling scenarios having multiple interacting decision makers: people, businesses, governments, animals, and genes. This mini-course introduces some game theoretic tools and their applications in settings appropriate for math majors.

Organizer:
Rick Gillman, Valparaiso University

Minicourse

Minicourse 4. Introduction to WeBWorK: An Open Source Alternative to Generate and Deliver Online Homework Problems, Part A

9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 204

Participants will learn to utilize the opensource online homework system WeBWorK. Adopted by over 1200 institutions, WeBWorK includes an extensive, curated library of over 35,000 exercises encompassing the collegiate curriculum. Subjects include College Algebra, Calculus, ODEs, Linear Algebra, Statistics, and Introduction to Proofs. Participants will learn how to utilize WeBWorK in their classrooms and to edit WeBWorK exercises.

Organizers:
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho
Stacey Rodman, Augustana College

Sponsor:
MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education (CTME)

Invited Address

AMS-MAA Joint Invited Address

Learning in Games

10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Éva Tardos, Cornell University

Selfish behavior can often lead to suboptimal outcome for all participants, a phenomenon illustrated by many classical examples in game theory. Over the last decade we have studied Nash equilibria of games, and developed good understanding how to quantify the impact of strategic user behavior on overall performance in many games (including traffic routing as well as online auctions). In this talk we will focus on games where players use a form of learning that helps them adapt to the environment. We ask if the quantitative guarantees obtained for Nash equilibria extend to such out of equilibrium game play, or even more broadly, when the game or the population of players is dynamically changing and where participants have to adapt to the dynamic environment.

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Complex Dynamics and Elliptic Curves, Lecture I

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Laura DeMarco, Northwestern University

In a series of three talks, I will present connections between recent research in dynamical systems and the classical theory of elliptic curves and rational points. On the dynamical side -- specifically in the study of iteration of rational functions (Julia sets, bifurcations, the Mandelbrot set), but originating in the mathematical study of planetary motion -- the first connections to number theory were observed about 100 years ago. On the arithmetic side, it was probably the 1960s when dynamical ideas were first used as tools to understand the arithmetic geometry of elliptic curves and higher-dimensional varieties. My goal is to provide examples of how these relationships developed and where they have brought us today. The three talks will be independent.

Poster Session

General Contributed Poster Session I

10:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom B

Given last year’s success with the MAA Contributed Poster Session (CPS), the MAA is pleased to continue with this session at MathFest 2019 in Cincinnati. We will rotate the poster categories throughout the meeting and the number of rotations will depend on the number of accepted posters. The MAA will provide corkboards or trifolds for the posters – you just need to bring your poster.

Please consult this year's Call for Posters for more information on the sessions in general, and what to expect for submitting and preparing presentations

1. The Integration of Mathematics and Science: A Plan for a High School Integrated Pre-Calculus and Physics Course

Courtney Fox, Clermont Northeastern High School/University of Cincinnati

2. Towson University's Pre-Service Teachers' STEM Modeling Activities with Baltimore City Middle School Students

Diana Cheng, Towson University
Rachael Talbert, Towson University
Kimberly Corum, Towson University

3. Dancing through Mathematics: Kinesthetic Activities in Figure Skating Camps

Rachel Schmitz, Towson University

4. Mathematical Misconceptions and Teaching Implications at the Secondary Level

Rachel Balthrop, Cheatham County Central High School
Kassi Rye, Northwest High School
Jackie Vogel, Austin Peay State University

5. UVU PREP - Intensive Summer STEM Program

Liz Andrus, Utah Valley University
Daniel Horns, Utah Valley University
Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University
Krista Ruggles, Utah Valley University

6. Maps, Bridges, Networks, and Art Galleries: Introducing Secondary Students to Graph Theory through Classic Problems (CANCELED)

Jessica Oehrlein, Columbia University

7. Math Outreach Activities for Secondary School Students

Lauren DeDieu, University of Calgary

8. Sorting: Easy as 1, 2, 3!

Iris Tong, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Kagen Quiballo, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

9. Coloring Mapematics!

Yasir Silviano Badillo Acosta, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Kelly A. Jezior, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Iris Y. Tong, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Kagen J. Quiballo, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

10. Examples of Real Time Modeling in Differential Equations Courses

Brian Winkel, SIMIODE

11. Resequencing Calculus at a Small Liberal Arts College: Balancing the Needs of Math Majors and Pre-Meds within Staffing Budget Constraints

Joan Lubben, Dakota Wesleyan University

12. A POGIL-Style Activity to Introduce or Review Vectors

Chris Oehrlein, Oklahoma City Community College

13. StatPREP: Transforming Intro Stat using a Data-Centered Approach

Jenna P. Carpenter, Campbell University

14. Program-Level Assessment . . . Don't Run Away!

Alan Alewine, McKendree University

15. Building Career-Ready Skills in Undergraduate Mathematics Majors

Michele L. Joyner, East Tennessee State University

16. Improving Mathematics Education for Nurses: Updates on a National Initiative

Daniel Ozimek, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
John Clochesy, University of Miami
Martha Ellis, Charles A. Dana Center
Beth Kelch, Delta College
Kathryn Stuck Boyd, Cleveland Clinic
Anna Wendel, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Michelle Younker, Owens Community College

17. Modeling Scenarios via Writing Projects

Eric Stachura, Kennesaw State University

18. SIMIODE: Let Mathematical Modeling Inspire Your Differential Equations Class

Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

19. Homework Revisions vs. Meeting with the Professor: Which Better Helps Precalculus Students Learn?

Rachel Epstein, Georgia College

20. Cooperative Learning in an Introduction to Topology Course

Erin Griesenauer, Eckerd College

21. Developing Students’ Mathematical Background for University-Level Statistics Course in a Flipped Classroom, In-class Worksheets, Peer Interaction, and Class Projects in an Inclusive Classroom Environment

Chamila Kumari Ranaweera, University of Colorado Boulder

22. Using Art to Express Mathematics

Jonathan Keiter, East Stroudsburg University

23. Getting to the Top: Less Pain, More Gain

Kristopher Pruitt, U.S. Air Force Academy
Michael Brilleslyper, U.S. Air Force Academy

24.MYMathApps Calculus Tutorials

Philip B. Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Matthew Weihing, Texas A&M University
Joseph Martinsen, Texas A&M University
Akash Rao, Texas A&M University

25. Delivering Pre-Class Activities ViaWeBWorK to Impact Student Learning

Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Valorie Zonnefeld, Dordt University

26. Construction of an Infinite Square Matrix to Observe Various Forms of Whole Numbers

Danny T. Lau, University of North Georgia

27. There are 70 Finite Regular Ternary Quadratic Forms

Frank Patane, Samford University
Raymond Herbert, University of Alabama

28. Exploring Asymmetrical Results in Mathematics

Brian J. Shelburne, Wittenberg University

29. Hensel's p-Acid Numbers

Phil Blau, Shawnee State University

30. CM Method and Expansion of Numbers

Abdulmajeed Abdurrahman, Shippensburg University

31. Preserving p-Adic Metrics (RESCHEDULED to Session II)

Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University

32. Multiplicity of Hexagon Numbers

Cameron G. Hale, UAB
Jonathan R. Kelleher, UAB
John C. Mayer, UAB

33. Mathematical and Artistic Creative Processes: Distilling Models, Mapping Interdisciplinary Intersections (RESCHEDULED to PosterFest)

Kerry O'Grady, Johns Hopkins University

34. Conjoint Analysis Approach for Defining Part Worth Utilities to Criteria Weighing into the “Go/No-Go” Decision Faced by NGOs in Disaster Response

Danilo R. Diedrichs, Wheaton College
Paul A. Isihara, Wheaton College

35. Data Arising from Destructive Samples: The Case of Spina Bifida

Rigwed R. Tatu, University of Cincinnati

Invited Address

MAA Chan Stanek Lecture for Students

Secrets of Grad School Success

1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Mohamed Omar, Harvey Mudd College

Around this time of year many rising seniors and even rising juniors are wondering what to do after college, and many contemplate the idea of going to graduate school. Naturally, they seek advice from peers, professors at their college and the internet. In this talk, we'll give some pretty unconventional advice based on the speakers experiences through the same process.

Invited Paper Session

Equity and Justice in the Context of Inquiry

1:50 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 200

Inquiry pedagogies offer rich learning experiences that can support under-served populations in collegiate mathematics. However, elements of these environments can alienate exactly the students instructors are hoping to support. So equity and inquiry must be theorized and researched together in order to offer justice for all students. This session brings research agendas into direct conversation for mathematicians and educators.

Organizer:
Brian Katz, Augustana College

Sponsors:
SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)
SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

Introduction to the Session

1:50 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Brian Katz, Augustana College

Inquiry and Equity: Necessary But Not Sufficient

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Sandra Laursen, University of Colorado Boulder

The IBL Experience When Students of Color Are in the Majority

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Robin Wilson and Stacy Brown, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Examined Inquiry-Oriented Instructional Moves with an Eye Toward Gender Equity

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Jessica Smith, Florida State University
Christine Andrews-Larson, Florida State University
Daniel L. Reinholz,San Diego State University
Amelia Stone-Johnstone, San Diego State University
Brooke Mullins, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

TBA

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Rochelle Gutierrez, University of Illinois

Panel Discussion

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.

Invited Paper Session

Cryptography and the Mathematics Behind It

1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 205

Modern day society and the security of our voting, banking, and military systems rely on cryptography to ensure privacy and allow secure communication. Important problems in cybersecurity are being solved using number theory, algebraic geometry, and the mathematics of lattices. This session on the mathematics behind cryptography is aimed at a general mathematical audience.

This session will have expository talks aimed at a general mathematical audience and will be suitable for both students and faculty.

Organizer:
Alice Silverberg, University of California, Irvine

Language, Probability, and Cryptography

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Adriana Salerno, Bates College

Inrtoduwtion to Erorr Dwtetcion and Czorrectmon

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Steven J Miller, Williams College

Post-quantum Key Exchange Based on "Learning with Errors" Problems

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Jintai Ding, University of Cincinnati

Public-key Cryptography from Supersingular Elliptic Curve Isogenies

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
David Jao, University of Waterloo

\(x^n+x+a\)

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Kumar Murty, University of Toronto

Contributed Paper Session

Plug and Play Data Science Lessons, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 4:05 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 233

In this session, papers include data science lessons that attendees can seamlessly incorporate into courses such as Finite Math, Calculus, Linear Algebra, Discrete Mathematics, Mathematical Modeling, and others. Presentations include such elements as an overview of the lesson, student learning objectives, assessments, and a summary of the effectiveness of the lesson if available.

Organizers:
Michael Boardman, Pacific University
Timothy Chartier, Davidson College
Jason Douma, University of Sioux Falls

Sponsor:
Committee for the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM)

Data at Disney: Using Clustering to Maximize Mickey Bar Sales

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Liz Bouzarth, Furman University
Kevin Hutson, Furman University

An In-Class Geo-Spatial Data Science Project...Inspired by a Comedian

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Russell Goodman, Central College

Movie Recommendation as an Introduction to Machine Learning Principles

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Jacob Price, University of Puget Sound
Jeremy Upsal, University of Washington

Enough Linear Algebra for Machine Learning

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Daniel T. Kaplan, Macalester College

A Lesson in Data Science and Computational Thinking Using Real Data

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Boyan Kostadinov, City Tech, CUNY

Discriminant Analysis and Logistic Regression Connections

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Jacqueline R. Herman, Northern Kentucky University

Two Data Science Projects in PIC Math Class

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Haiyan Su, Montclair State University

R Projects Can Complement the Inverted Classroom

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
John T. Sieben, Texas Lutheran University
Reza O. Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University

Contributed Paper Session

Ethics in the Mathematics Classroom

1:30 p.m. - 4:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 260, 261 & 262

The mathematical sciences have a central role to address the use and misuse of mathematics and data that fueling a global ethics crisis. This session aims to describe the integration of ethics into the mathematics classroom and ethical issues surrounding the teaching of mathematics. Talks cover how ethics are addressed, and reflect upon the successes and challenges to implementation.

Organizers:
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Catherine Buell, Fitchburg State University

Sponsor:
Special Issue of PRIMUS: Ethics in Mathematics Education

Ethics in Mathematics: An Existence Theorem

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Catherine A. Buell, Fitchburg State University
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Ethics and Responsibility in STEM

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Dawn Nelson, Saint Peter's University

Ethical Perspectives Through Game Theory

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Andrew Windle, Rockhurst University

Fostering Ethical Reflection in the Mathematics Classroom through Interdisciplinary Approaches to Learning (CANCELED)

2:30 pm. - 2:45 p.m.
Georges-Philippe Gadoury-Sansfacon, Bishop's University

Using Fairness as a Theme in General Education Mathematics Courses

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Adam Giambrone, Elmira College

Ethical Considerations in a Data-Driven World

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Stacy L. Hoehn, Franklin College

Ethics in Mathematics Curricula from the Beginning

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Reflective Service Learning as a Means to Teach Ethics

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Erin Griesenauer, Eckerd College

Contributed Paper Session

History of Mathematics in a Math Circle, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 237 & 238

During this session, presenters will share mathematical topics and problems of a historical nature for use in a math circle. This can include such ideas as, but not limited to, working a class of problems using historical methods, discovering methods of calculation from a former time or culture, discovering how mathematical concepts were discovered or used historically or culturally.

Organizers:
Amy Shell-Gellasch, Eastern Michigan University
Philip Yasskin, Texas A&M University

Sponsors:
SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)
The History of Mathematics SIGMAA (HOM SIGMAA)

The Frobenius Stamped Coin McNugget

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Andy Martin, Kentucky State University

Problem Posing with Dice Probability in Mathematics Teacher Circles

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Chris Bolognese, Columbus Academy

Many Worlds History of Map Coloring

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Skona Brittain, SB Family School

Journal of Math Circles (JMC)

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Brandy S. Wiegers, Central Washington University
Emilie Hancock, Central Washington University

Math Circles Based on Newton's Mathematics

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Robert Sachs, George Mason University

Exploring Infinitesimals in a Math Teachers Circle

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Cymra Haskell, University of Southern California

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 230 & 231

Inquiry-based learning (IBL) transforms students from consumers to producers of mathematics. IBL methods aim to develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and processes by putting students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use and effects of IBL methods for teaching and learning.

Organizers:
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Susan Crook, Loras College
Brian Katz, Augustana College
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy

Sponsor:
The SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

It Takes a Village to Learn Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Jacci White, Saint Leo University
Monika Kiss, Saint Leo University

Using Videos, Reflections, and Portfolios to Promote Inquiry

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Megan Wawro, Virginia Tech

A Guided Reinvention Approach to Beginning Algebra

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Diana Underwood, Purdue Northwest

Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries: Using Group-Work and IBL Methods in a Textbook-Free Approach to Teaching Non-Math Majors Logic and The Basics of Proof-Based Mathematics

2:30 p.m. -2:45 p.m.
Heidi Andersen, University of Dallas

Hands-on Activities for a Liberal Arts Math Course

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Grace McClurkin, Saginaw Valley State University

Quantitative Reasoning via Inquiry

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Gregory D. Foley, Ohio University
Stephen N. Shadik, Ohio University
Deependra Budhathoki, Ohio University

Contributed Paper Session

A Centennial Celebration of David Harold Blackwell

1:30 p.m.. - 3:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 232

David Harold Blackwell (April 24, 1919 - July 8, 2010) is arguably the most decorated and well-known of African Americans in the Mathematical Sciences. Blackwell would have turned 100 years old in 2019. To commemorate this, the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM) will host a Themed Contributed Paper Session for individuals to examine the influence Blackwell has had on the profession.

Organizers: Edray Herber Goins, Pomona College
Janis D. Oldham, North Carolina A&T
Scott W. Williams, SUNY Buffalo

The Alternative Universes of David Blackwell and William Claytor

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Ronald Elbert Mickens, Clark Atlanta University

Game Theory: A Survey of an Intriguing Contribution of David Blackwell

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Asamoah Nkwanta, Morgan State University

Blackwell’s Contribution to Dynamic Programming

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Mark Lewis, Cornell University

David Blackwell: Bayesian Statistics and Contributions to the Statistics Community

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Kimberly S. Weems, North Carolina Central University

Blackwell-Tapia 2000-2018

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Carlos Castillo-Chavez, Arizona State University

Behind the Scenes: The David Blackwell that I Knew

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Richard A. Tapia,

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula, Part B

1:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 207 & 208

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Timothy D. Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Sweet Briar College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA)

Pain Medication and Tree Leaves: Mathematical Modeling Tasks for Future Secondary Teachers

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Jacy Beck, Utah State University
Ricardo Cortez, Tulane University
Brynja Kohler, Utah State University

Engaging Undergraduates in Research in Mathematical Biology with Limited Resources

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Timothy D. Comar, Benedictine University

Data Analysis with Destructive Samples: Spina Bifida Case

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Marepalli B. Rao, University of Cincinnati
Rigwed Tatu, University of Cincinnati

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, Gambling and Sports, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 4:25 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 206

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, gambling, and sports provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates or examples of the use of the solutions of these problems in the undergraduate classroom are encouraged.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (Rec SIGMAA)

Using Graph Theory to Analyze Ticket to Ride© Expansions

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Kimberly Jordan Burch, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Chuteless and Ladderless

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Darren Glass, Gettysburg College
Stephen Lucas, James Madison University

Playing Farkle with N-sided Dice

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Jeremiah Bartz, University of North Dakota

Mathematical Results for New Versions of the Game of SET

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Anne Quinn, Edinboro University of PA

The Polya Enumeration with the 1258 Game

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Jon-Lark Kim, Sogang University

The Q Queens Problem with P Pawns

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Doug Chatham Morehead State University

Breaking and Remaking the New Zealand Puzzle

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Keith Brandt Rockhurst University

Back to the Tower (CANCELED)

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
John Bonomo, Westminster College

You Only Need a Bit of Luck to Win MTV's Are You The One?

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Stanley R. Huddy, Fairleigh Dickinson University
Nomin Sukhbaatar, Fairleigh Dickinson University

Panel Session

Living Proof: Stories of Resilience Along the Mathematical Journey

1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 263

Living Proof is a collection of short stories written by those from all corners of the mathematical community with the hope to inspire current students, illustrating how mathematicians overcame hard content, sexism, questions of identity, and more. Panelists will discuss how the project evolved, why they contributed to the book, and what struggle and resilience mean in our discipline.

Organizers:
Emille Lawrence, University of San Francisco
Matthew Pons, North Central College
David Taylor, Roanoke College
Allison Henrich, Seattle University

Panelists:
Emille Lawrence, University of San Francisco
Matthew Pons, North Central College
Hortensia Soto, University of Northern Colorado
David Taylor, Roanoke College
Pamela Harris, Williams College

Workshop

What’s the Story? Research Presentations for an Undergraduate Audience

1:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 201

Presenting recent and ongoing research to undergraduate students is fun and rewarding, but frequently challenging. The gory details of mathematical results often require a great deal of specific jargon and background knowledge. Nonetheless, the big idea-the “story”-can almost always be presented at a variety of levels. This workshop is designed to help graduate students formulate a presentation on their research that is appropriate for an audience of undergraduate students, something many colleges and universities require as part of a job interview. Moreover, the ability to communicate complex mathematical ideas is a valued trait in any context. As such, this session aims to develop a framework for creating an engaging and accessible presentation for undergraduates. Graduate students who will be going on the job market in the fall may find this workshop especially useful.

Organizer:
May Mei, Denison University

Minicourse

Minicourse 1. Beyond Traditional Grading Schemes, Part A

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom A

Mastery grading is an assessment approach in which students are provided clear learning objectives and grades are directly based on students' ability to demonstrate complete mastery of these objectives by the end of the semester. Recent trends indicate this grading structure encourages a growth-mindset, reduces test anxiety, and improves student gains. This minicourse is designed for new practitioners.

Organizers:
Jessica O’Shaughnessy, Shenandoah University
Jeb Collins, Mary Washington University
Amanda Harsey, Lewis University
Alyssa Hoofnagle, Wittenberg University
Mike Jansen, Dordt College

Sponsor:
MAA Committee on Assessment

Minicourse

Minicourse 2. Creating a Purposeful Student Learning Experience, Part A

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 204

Do your requirements for your departmental majors constitute an integrated framework for student success, or are they just a set of individual classes? Do your faculty work together effectively to achieve desired outcomes and to assess your progress? Do you strategically incorporate experiences outside the classroom in student learning? This minicourse will guide you in creating a learning-focused departmental culture.

Organizers:
Dan Callon, Franklin College
John Boardman, Franklin College
Paul Fonstad, Franklin College
Justin Gash, Franklin College
Stacy Hoehn, Franklin College
Angie Walls, Franklin College

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

2:30 p.m. – 6:05 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Rooms 210, 211, 235, 251

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

2:30 p.m. – 6:05 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Rooms 234, 236, 264

Pi Mu Epsilon student members who wish to represent their chapters as student speakers or official delegates should visit the PME website at http://pme-math.org/ for more information.

Please note: all student presenters are required to be registered for MAA MathFest.

Organizer: Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Panel Session

Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching as an Integrated Application in Core Mathematics Major Courses

3:00p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 263

Core mathematics majors’ courses often have designated application problems from areas like physics or engineering. The MAA META Math project focuses on explicitly adding “secondary mathematics teaching” to the list of legitimate application areas of mathematics by creating resources for use in undergraduate mathematics courses. Panelists will describe a variety of initiatives that address mathematics courses for teaching.

Organizer:
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University
Elizabeth Fulton, Montana State University

Panelists:
Elizabeth Burroughs, Montana State University
James Tanton, Mathematical Association of America
Rick Hudson, University of Southern Indiana
Lisa Berger, Stony Brook University

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on the Mathematical Knowledge of Teachers (SIGMAA MKT)

Poster Session

General Contributed Poster Session II

3:00 p.m. - 3:45 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom B

Given last year’s success with the MAA Contributed Poster Session (CPS), the MAA is pleased to continue with this session at MathFest 2019 in Cincinnati. We will rotate the poster categories throughout the meeting and the number of rotations will depend on the number of accepted posters. The MAA will provide corkboards or trifolds for the posters – you just need to bring your poster.

Please consult this year's Call for Posters for more information on the sessions in general, and what to expect for submitting and preparing presentations

1. Universal Course Design for Linear Algebra Instruction

Roza Aceska, Ball State University
Crystal Lorch, Ball State University

2. My Favorite (algebra based) Math Contest Questions

Ashley Johnson, University of North Alabama

3. Hands-On Learning in a Mathematical Reasoning Course

L. Jeneva Clark, University of Tennessee

4. Using an Overview of All of Math History in a Math History Classroom: Highlighting Mathematicians and Mathematics

Daniel Kiteck, Indiana Wesleyan University

5. Active Learning Practices for First-Year Calculus

Kevser Erdem, University of Cincinnati
Casey Monday, University of Cincinnati

6. Adventures in Online Teaching with First Year Students
Grace E. Cook, Bloomfield College

 

7. The Carrot and the Stick: Attempts to Get Homework Completed when Due

Jennifer Szczesniak, Hagerstown Community College

8. Improving Student Understanding of Multivariable Calculus Concepts Using the CalcPlot3D Visualization Applet

Monica VanDieren, Robert Morris University
Paul Seeburger, Monroe Community College
Deborah Moore-Russo, University of Oklahoma

9. Changing the Culture of Calculus

James M. Talamo, The Ohio State University
Nela Lakos, The Ohio State University

10. The Traveling Mathematics Department

Duane Farnsworth, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
Jon Beal, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
Carey Childers, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
Daniel Shifflet, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
Marcella McConnell, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
Michael McConnell, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
Kate Overmoyer, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
Adam Roberts, Clarion University of Pennsylvania

11. Teaching Introductory Mathematical Modeling for Mathematics Majors

Nicole M. Panza,Francis Marion University

12. Developing a Mathematics through Illusion Course

Matthew J. Haines, Augsburg University

13. An Exit-Polling Project in a First-Year Seminar

Russell Goodman, Central College

14. Factors and Methods of STEM Student Retention

James Quinlan, University of New England

16. Implementing Inquiry Using POGIL (2.0)

Jill Shahverdian, Quinnipiac University

17. Cubic Curve Classifications: From Newton to Modern Day

Mark Bly, Coastal Carolina University

18. Mr.

Alvin Chi Hi Ng, Diligence(Tutor Centre)

19. Pythagoras and Music Theory

Jillian Honea, University of Tennessee
Jackie Vogel, Austin Peay State University

20. Galois Groups of Even Quartics and Doubly Even Octic Polynomials

Chad Awtrey, Elon University

21. Cubics, Triangles, Cardano, & Statistics

G. Gerard Wojnar, Frostburg State University

22. h

Max Lind, USP
Eugene Fiorini, Muhlenberg College

23. Co-prime Labelings of Complete Bipartite Graphs

Michael Brilleslyper, U. S. Air Force Academy
Ethan Berkove, Lafayette College

24. Neighborhood-Prime Labelings of Hamiltonian Graphs

Norman Bradley Fox, Austin Peay State University

25. Breaking Graph Symmetry

Darren Narayan, Rochester Institute of Technology

26. Bounds on Number of Positive First Differences for Algebraically Generated Costas Arrays

Christopher N. Swanson, Ashland University

27. Preserving p-Adic Metrics (RESCHEDULED from Session I)

Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University

27. Finding the Intermediate and Largest Integers in the Primitive Pythagorean Triple When Only the Smallest is Known (CANCELED)

Frederick D. Chichester, Retired

28. Percolation Threshold Values and Bounds for Archimedean Lattices

John C. Wierman, Johns Hopkins University

29. Complex Linear Algebra without Complex Numbers

Adam Coffman, Purdue University Fort Wayne

30. Disjointness Preserving Nonlinear and Point-wise Determined Maps on Banach Lattices

William Feldman, University of Arkansas

31. An Extended Deletion-Contraction Recurrence for the Chromatic Polynomial

Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University

(NEW!) 32. Fibonacci Cordial Labeling of Some Special Graphs

Sarbari Mitra, Fort Hays State University

32. Comparing String-Similarity Algorithms in the Task of Name-Matching (CANCELED)

Aleksandra Zaba, University of Utah

33. Experimental Estimation of a Sequence's Order of Convergence

Michelle Ghrist, Gonzaga University

34. Numerical Results for Linear Sequential Caputo Fractional Differential Equations with Initial and Boundary Conditions of Order 2q Using Laplace Transform Method

Bhuvaneswari Sambandham, Dixie State University

35. Program Review at Baldwin Wallace (RESCHEDULED to the Program Review Experience)

Peggy Slavik, Baldwin Wallace University
Brent Daniel Strunk, Baldwin Wallace University

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Section Officers Meeting

3:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom C

This session is moderated by Lisa Marano, West Chster University, Chair of the MAA Committee on Sections. It is open to all section officers and their guests.

Other Mathematical Session

Speed Interview Marathon for Graduate Students

3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom D

Employers suggest communication skills are a critical component of job interviews. This session for undergraduate students, graduate students and early career mathematicians helps participants hone these skills, with best practices and tips on job interviewing and three speed interviewing sessions to practice what participants have learned. Sessions include individual feedback for participants and opportunities to network with fellow interviewees.

Organizers
Edray Goins, Pomona College
Jenna Carpenter, Campbell University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Graduate Students

Minicourse

Minicourse 5. Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings, Part A

3:40 p.m. – 5:40 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 204

We introduce hands-on, practical art puzzles that motivate the mathematics of projective geometry---the study of properties invariant under projective transformations. On the art side, we explore activities in perspective drawing or photography. These activities inform the mathematical side, where we introduce activities in problem solving and proof suitable for a sophomore-level proofs class. No artistic experience is required.

Organizer:
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College,

Sponsor:
SIGMAA-ARTS

Minicourse

Minicourse 6. Mathematical Card Magic, Part A

3:40 p.m. – 5:40 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom A

A modern survey of self-working mathematical card magic, from classics such as binary and Gilbreath principle based entertainments to original principles and effects discovered by the presenter and previously shared at MAA.org. A special feature will be two-person card magic based on subtle mathematical communication principles: discrete mathematics, combinatorics and elementary probability. No prerequisites, and no sleight of hand skills are required.

Organizer:
Colm Mulcahy, Spelman College

Other Mathematical Session

Read the Masters Session: Euler's Introductio in Analysin Infinitorum

3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 201

Leonhard Euler's Introductio (1748) is a key text in the history of mathematics. In it, Euler provided the foundation for much of today's mathematical analysis, focusing in particular on functions and their development into infinite series. At this event, a brief description of what is entailed in engaging historical texts, especially through small reading groups, will precede an open reading session of a portion of the Introductio (in English translation, with guiding questions) by attendees in small groups, followed by a general discussion. No experience with the history of mathematics is required.

Organizers
Erik Tou, University of Washington Tacoma
Daniel Otero, Xavier University
Lawrence D'Antonio, Ramapo College
Robert Bradley, Adelphi University
Amy Shell-Gellasch, Eastern Michigan University

Sponsors: Euler Society, ORESME, HoM SIGMAA, ARITHMOS, TRIUMPHS

Contributed Paper Session

Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation, Part A

3:50 p.m. - 5:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 230 & 231

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at: http://mathfest2019.davidfailing.com/

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Russ Goodman, Central College
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Reducing Student Testing Anxiety by Implementing a Three-Stage Group Testing Method (CANCELED)

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Suzanne Caulfield, Cardinal Stritch University

Investigation of Inverted and Active Pedagogies in STEM Disciplines ,Final Report

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Reza O. Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University
Mike Czuchry, Texas Lutheran University

Changes to Student Self-efficacy and Motivation with Team-Based Learning

4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Jeffrey M. Ford, Gustavus Adolphus College

Learning about Learning

4:50 p.m.- 5:05 p.m.
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College

Getting the Most out of Collaborative Learning

5:10 p.m. - 5:25 p.m.
Karen F. Smith, UC Blue Ash College

Using Learning Assistants to Encourage Active Learning

5:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Justin Dunmyre, Frostburg State University

SIGMAA Actitivy

IBL SIGMAA Business Meeting, Reception, and Guest Lecture

Why Inclusivity Matters for IBL

Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

4:30 p.m. - 5:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 200

Many of us recognize the importance of inclusion within the mathematics community, but some might question why it is particularly important for IBL. We will address this question by identifying the challenges and opportunities for an inclusive classroom climate that arise uniquely when IBL is used. We will also share some practical tips to improve the climate for inclusion in your IBL class.

Other Mathematical Session

Section NExT Leadership Meeting

5:00 p.m. - 5:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom C

This informal discussion will provide Section NExT Leaders the opportunity to compare notes, including challenges and opportunities. We will focus on the ways that Section NExT supports the MAA values of community, inclusivity, communication and teaching/learning. We will also think about ways the sections can support each other and how we might identify some standard practices that enable MAA HQ to support Section NExT. The session will be developed in consultation with Section NExT leaders and facilitated by MAA Deputy Executive Director Ray Levy.

Organizers:
Ray Levy, Mathematical Association of America
Cheryl Adams, Mathematical Association of America
Lisa Marano, West Chester University

Social Event

Graduate Student Reception

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom B

Graduate students are invited for some refreshments and to meet several of the invited speakers.

Organizers
Edray Goins, Pomona College
Eric Eager, University of Wisconsin at La Crosse

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Graduate Students

Other Mathematical Session

The President’s Membership Jubilee

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Magic tricks, popular movies, achievements in sport, games and puzzles, mimes, soap bubbles are not what the general public associates with mathematics. But for many of us, these are another fun and exciting side of mathematics. During the MAA President’s Jubilee, different presenters will highlight some of these areas of mathematics. Come join us.


Friday, August 2

Registration & Information

8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom Lobby

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

8:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Rooms 210, 211, 235, 251

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

8:30 a.m. – 12:05 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Rooms 236, 264

Pi Mu Epsilon student members who wish to represent their chapters as student speakers or official delegates should visit the PME website at http://pme-math.org/ for more information.

Please note: all student presenters are required to be registered for MAA MathFest.

Organizer: Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Exhibit Hall

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom B

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Prize Session

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

The session is organized by MAA Secretary James Sellers, Penn State University, and is moderated by MAA President Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University.

Minicourse

Minicourse 3. Game Theoretic Modeling for Math Majors, Part B

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom A

Mathematical modeling bridges the distance between the real world in which we operate and the abstract world that provides guiding structures. We use game theory as a mathematical tool when modeling scenarios having multiple interacting decision makers: people, businesses, governments, animals, and genes. This mini-course introduces some game theoretic tools and their applications in settings appropriate for math majors.

Organizer:
Rick Gillman, Valparaiso University

Minicourse

Minicourse 4. Introduction to WeBWorK: An Open Source Alternative to Generate and Deliver Online Homework Problems, Part B

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 204

Participants will learn to utilize the opensource online homework system WeBWorK. Adopted by over 1200 institutions, WeBWorK includes an extensive, curated library of over 35,000 exercises encompassing the collegiate curriculum. Subjects include College Algebra, Calculus, ODEs, Linear Algebra, Statistics, and Introduction to Proofs. Participants will learn how to utilize WeBWorK in their classrooms and to edit WeBWorK exercises.

Organizers:
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho
Stacey Rodman, Augustana College

Sponsor:
MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education (CTME)

Invited Paper Session

The Mathematics of Uncertainty

10:10 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 200

We encounter uncertainty everywhere, at all levels of consciousness, in all of our endeavors. Even things of which we are certain: the sun rises tomorrow, our existence has a finite time span, are subject to imprecision. How has mathematics helped us understand uncertainty and unpredictability?

In this session we present mathematics that guides decisions under incomplete information or cognitive limitations.

Organizer:
Ami Radunskaya, Pomona College

Crossing the Threshold: The Role of Demographic Stochasticity in the Evolution of Cooperation

10:10 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Tom LoFaro, Gustavus Adolphus College

Stochastic Perturbations of the Logistic Map

10:40 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Kim Ayers, Pomona College

Logic for Reasoning about Uncertainty Dynamics and Informational Cascades

11:10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Joshua Sack, California State University, Long Beach

Probability As a Tool for Studying Problems in Behavioral Economics

11:40 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Aloysius Bathi Kasturiarachi, Kent State University

Contributed Paper Session

Understanding Mathematics Through its History, Part A

10:10 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 207 & 208

Many mathematical concepts experienced a long and complex evolution before arriving on the pages of today’s undergraduate textbooks. Often, understanding some of this history can greatly enhance a student’s understanding of mathematics. Moreover, an exploration of history can show how mathematics is connected to the wider world of human inquiry, affected by the same cultural values and prejudices as other subjects. This session seeks to share interesting historical episodes or developments linked to undergraduate mathematics, for the benefit of students and teachers alike.

Organizer:
Erik Tou, University of Washington

Sponsor:
The Euler Society

Archimedes' Quadrature of the Parabola

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Bill Linderman, King University

The Ideal Result of Fermat's Taunt

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Holly Attenborough, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Completing the Square with al-Khw\({a}rizm{\i}\): a TRIUMPHS PSP

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Daniel Otero, Xavier University

Rules and Demonstration in Cardano’s Ars Magna (1545)

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
William Branson, St Cloud State University

Figurate Numbers from Nicomachus to Pascal

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Jerry M. Lodder, New Mexico State University

Introducing topology via Euler's formula

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
Anne Duffee, Sewanee: the University of the South

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching, Part C

10:10 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 230 & 231

Inquiry-based learning (IBL) transforms students from consumers to producers of mathematics. IBL methods aim to develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and processes by putting students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use and effects of IBL methods for teaching and learning.

Organizers:
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Susan Crook, Loras College
Brian Katz, Augustana College
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy

Sponsor:
The SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Something for Everyone

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Alex Rennet, University of Toronto, Mississauga

Supporting Instructors in the Transition to Inquiry Based Methods: A Preliminary Study on a Multi-Sectional Implementation in College Algebra

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Topaz Wiscons, California State University, Sacramento
Abigail Higgins, California State University, Sacramento
Sayonita Ghosh Hajra, California State University, Sacramento

Successes and Failures in an IBL Pre-Calculus Course

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Andrew-David Bjork, Siena Heights University

Characterizing Failure: The Case of Pre-Calculus

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Timothy Boester, University of Maine

Student Responses: Would You Take Another IBL Mathematics Course?

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Kelly Bubp, Ohio University
Harman Aryal, Ohio University
Deependra Budhathoki, Ohio University
Otto Shaw, Ohio University

Specification Grading in an Inquiry-based Introductory Differential Equations Course

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 a.m.
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Contributed Paper Session

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Mathematics, Part A

10:10 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 260, 261 & 262

National data trends indicate a need to shift representation in the mathematical sciences with respect to diversity, equity, and inclusion. In response, many departments and instructors have sought to understand the barriers that inhibit persistence and success in mathematics, particularly among underrepresented minority, first-generation, low-income, and female students. This session invites presenters to share how they engage diverse student populations.

Organizers:
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Ranthony A.C. Edmonds, The Ohio State University
Alison Marr, Southwestern University
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College

Beyond Leaky Pipes: Fostering Pathways and Persistence in the Mathematical Sciences

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Alison Marr, Southwestern University
Ranthony A. C. Edmonds, The Ohio State University
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College

Informing and Encouraging All Math Majors

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University

Leveling the Playing Field: Effective Classroom Practices for First Generation College Students

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Rachel Frankel, UC Blue Ash College
Karen F. Smith, UC Blue Ash College

Finding Your Mathematical Roots

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Linda McGuire, Muhlenberg College

Change Is a Thing You Can Count On: Adjusting to Meet Diverse Student Needs

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Kathryn Cerrone, The University of Akron
Irina Chernikova, The University of Akron
Sukanya Kemp, The University of Akron

Diversifying and Humanizing Mathematics through Community Collaboration

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
Sayonita Ghosh Hajra, California State University Sacramento

Contributed Paper Session

Teaching Mathematics Through Games, Part A

10:10 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 206

Come see methods for engaging students in mathematics through the development or play of board, card, and video games. Developing a game often requires the application of mathematics and it also appears in how one plays the game. Presentations describe class activities, class projects, or undergraduate research applications of mathematics. This session will be of interest to gamers and instructors.

Organizers:
Heidi Hulsizer, Benedictine College
Nickolas Hein, Benedictine College
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University
Martha Byrne, Sonoma State University

Recreational Mathematics. What? How? Why?

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Jorge Nuno Silva, University of Lisbon

Learning Mathematics through Games in a General Education Mathematics Course

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Amanda Harsy, Lewis University
Marie Meyer, Lewis University
Brittany Stephenson, Lewis University
Michael Smith, Lewis University

Problem Solving Through Board Games

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Adam M. Glesser, California State University, Fullerton
Matt Rathbun, California State University, Fullerton

Winning in a Quantitative Literacy Course

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Axel Brandt, Northern Kentucky University

A Simple Card Demonstration to Engage College Algebra Students

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Christopher Ryan Loga, Southwestern Adventist University

Graph Theory Games Designed by Pre-service Teachers

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University

Contributed Paper Session

Showcase of Modeling to Motivate Differential Equations, Part A

10:10 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 233

Differential equations is a pivotal STEM course. Student and faculty backgrounds, and departmental constraints provide for variations in the course. Modeling can be incorporated into any version to motivate the study of differential equations. Presenters will share modeling materials and data collection experiences that generate inquiry-oriented learning. Presenters may discuss the value of modeling, assessment techniques, pedagogical successes, and challenges.

Organizers:
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

DE and Social Justice: A Cholera Model with Bacterial Reservoir

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Emma K. Groves, North Carolina State University
Sherry Adrian, Southwestern University

An Application of Compartmental Epidemic Models to Data from the 2016 Presidential Primary (CANCELED)

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Eileen C. McGraw, Stevenson University

The Local Brewery: A Project to Introduce Differential Equations in an Into Calculus Course

10:50 am. - 11:05 a.m.
Jonathan Oaks, Macomb Community College

Pursuit Curves for Accelerating Prey

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Andrew Sward, Augustana College

Humans vs. Zombies: A Phase Plane Analysis Activity

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Hope McIlwain, Mercer University

Inquiry-Oriented Approach to Teaching Differential Equations through Modeling Projects

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
Mary Vanderschoot, Wheaton College
Danilo R. Diedrichs, Wheaton College

Contributed Paper Session

Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation, Part B

10:10 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 237 & 238

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at: http://mathfest2019.davidfailing.com/

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Russ Goodman, Central College
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology

No Student is an Island: A Plethora of Pedagogical Practices for Collaborative Mathematics Classrooms

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
David Taylor, Roanoke College

Read the Book! Improving Reading Comprehension in Mathematics

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Tom Mahoney, Emporia State University

Continuing the Conversation: Creating Learning Spaces via Dynamic Discussion Forums

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Melissa Soto, California State University, Fullerton

Structuring a Course Around Reading Mathematics

11:10 a.m.- 11:25 a.m.
Sean Droms, Lebanon Valley College

Teach Students to Prepare for Class AND to Think about Their Learning

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Charlotte Knotts-Zides, Wofford College

The Value of Reflective Writing in Mastery-based Grading Systems

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
Adelaide Akers, Emporia State University

Contributed Paper Session

Professional Development in Mathematics: Looking Back, Looking Forward, on the Occasion of the 25th Anniversary of MAA Project NExT, Part A

10:10 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom D

Since MAA Project NExT was founded 25 years ago, a generation of mathematicians have participated in it and other PD programs. How have those programs impacted teaching and learning in mathematics? How have the challenges faced by college math instructors changed? Looking forward, how do we prepare today’s math instructors for the changes to come in the next 25 years?

Organizers:
Dave Kung, St. Mary’s College of Mar yland
Julie Barnes, Western Carolina University
Alissa Crans, Loyola Marymount University
Matt DeLong, Marian University

Activating Mathematics Instructors for Active Learning: The Role of Professional Development on Teaching

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Sandra Laursen, University of Colorado Boulder

Emotions, Behavior, Mythology, Passions, and Proof: Challenging Mathematical Culture and Transforming Our Teaching

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Benjamin Braun, University of Kentucky

What the K-12 Education Literature Can Tell Us about Effective Professional Development for Faculty

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Darryl Yong, Harvey Mudd College

Teaching Future Teachers and Mathematics Faculty Professional Learning

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Billy Jackson, University of Louisville
Shandy Hauk, San Francisco State University
David Tsay, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Distributed Leadership: A Framework for Continued Professional Development Workshops

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
L. Jeneva Clark, University of Tennessee
Jack Bookman, Duke University

Online Faculty Collaboration: Supporting Instructional Change in a Big Way

11:50 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
Karen Keene, North Carolina
Justin Dunmyre, North Carolina

Panel Session

Career Paths in Business, Industry, and Government

10:10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 263

You’re about to earn a degree in mathematics. Now what? There are many interesting job opportunities that don’t necessarily involve teaching. Whether you are a student looking for a job once you graduate or an advisor looking for advice to give to future job-seeking students, this session will help you gain new perspectives on careers in business, industry, and government.

Organizer:
Emille D. Lawrence, University of San Francisco
David Stone, Georgia Southern University
Jeb Collins, University of Mary Washington
Aihua Li, Montclair State University

Panelists:
Richard Uber, Air Force Institute of Technology
Ryan Snyder, State Auto Insurance Companies
Mary Sefcik, Cleveland Clinic
Deming Zhuang, Citi Group

Sponsor:
MAA Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUSA)
MAA Committee on Business, Industry, and Government Mathematics (BIG)

Workshop

Journal of Math Circles (JMC) Jam Session

10:10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 201

Write for Journal of Math Circles (JMC), a new peer-reviewed, open-access journal! JMC seeks articles documenting outreach in alignment with Math Circle core values: using worthwhile mathematical tasks, fostering problem-solving habits of mind, and building communities of mathematical thinkers and problem solvers. The workshop will introduce JMC and provide support for writing lesson plan, program summary, and professional development articles.

Organizers:
Brandy S. Wiegers, Central Washington University
Emilie Hancock, Central Washington University

Other Mathematical Session

National Science Foundation Funding Opportunities in the Education and Human Resources Directorate

10:10 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 232

NSF offers a variety of grant programs that promote innovations and research in learning, teaching and broadening participation in the mathematical sciences. Included in these programs are the Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)and Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE). Following a presentation about these and other programs in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources, the remainder of the session will feature opportunities to engage in small group discussions with NSF staff about program features, current NSF policy changes, proposal preparation guidance, and other related topics. The recommended audience for this presentation is undergraduates who may be considering graduate school, graduate students, and faculty.

Organizers:
Karen Keene, DUE NSF
Talitha Washington, National Science Foundation
Sandra Richardson, National Science Foundation
Minerva Cordero, National Science Foundation

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Complex Dynamics and Elliptic Curves, Lecture II

10:20 a.m. - 11:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Laura DeMarco, Northwestern University

In a series of three talks, I will present connections between recent research in dynamical systems and the classical theory of elliptic curves and rational points. On the dynamical side -- specifically in the study of iteration of rational functions (Julia sets, bifurcations, the Mandelbrot set) -- the first connections were observed about 100 years ago. On the arithmetic side, it was probably the 1960s when dynamical ideas were first used as tools to understand the arithmetic geometry of elliptic curves and higher-dimensional varieties. My goal is to provide an overview of how these relationships developed and where they have brought us today. The three lectures will be independent.

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

Solving Algebraic Equations

11:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Irena Swanson, Reed College

Abel and Ruffini, and later Galois showed that general polynomials of degree five or higher are not solvable with the usual arithmetic operations. Nevertheless, algebra offers powerful methods for solving many equations and for determining the structure of solutions even when the solutions themselves cannot be found. In this talk I will cover some classical and more recent methods, including Hilbert's Nullstellensatz and Gr\"obner bases. A running theme will be computational complexity, and the talk will end with more recent results in commutative algebra.

Other Mathematical Session

A Conversation with AMS and MAA on the Future of Meetings

11:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom C

Last year's announcement that AMS and MAA would discontinue shared management of the Joint Mathematics Meetings has raised questions among many in our community about how we can sustain the value of the collaboration associated with this annual event beyond 2021.

This session will allow leadership of both organizations to share their vision for the future, including annual and section meetings, and new initiatives to provide professional opportunities for members of our community. You are also invited to provide feedback directly to AMS at  http://www.ams.org/about-us/jmm-reimagined  and https://www.maa.org/meetings/jmm.

Organizers:
J. Michael Pearson, Executive Director of the Mathematical Association of America
Catherine A. Roberts, Executive Director of the American Mathematical Society

Sponsors:
Mathematical Assocation of America
American Mathematical Society

Poster Session

The Program Review Experience

12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom B (MAA Pavilion)

Via their posters, presenters from several campus will tell the story of their program review experiences. They describe what was expected of them, what difficulties they encountered, and what the outcomes of the review were

Organizer:
Rick Gilman, Valparaiso University

Sponsor:
MAA Committee on Program Review

Invited Address

AWM-MAA Etta Zuber Falconer Lecture

Dance of the Astonished Topologist ... or How I Left Squares and Hexes for Math

1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Tara Holm, Cornell University

Topology is often called ``rubber sheet geometry" and is described as ``floppy" while geometry is more ``rigid". Symplectic geometry, the natural geometry of classical mechanics, is floppier than Riemannian geometry but more rigid than topology. I will give a friendly introduction to some geometric and algebraic techniques in topology, proving along the way that a topologist can turn her trousers inside out without taking them off. I will then give an overview of the floppy/rigid spectrum, motivated by many pictures and examples. I will conclude with a description how covering spaces have been useful in my own work in symplectic geometry, and how they can make square dancing more challenging.

Invited Paper Session

The Serious Side of Recreational Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 200

More than a pastime, recreational mathematics runs the gamut from the combinatorial questions to the mathematical structures in the game SET to using juggling to create a proof in number theory. In this invited paper session, experts in recreational math show how starting with a fun puzzle, game, or story can take one on a trip to deep mathematics.

Organizer:
Robert Vallin, Lamar University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics

Bingo Paradoxes

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Art Benjamin, Harvey Mudd College

Garden of Eden Partitions for Bulgarian and Austrian Solitaire

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
James Sellers, Penn State University

Geometry, Combinatorics and the Game of SET

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Liz McMahon, Lafayette College

Throwing Together a Proof of Worpitzky's Identity

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Steve Butler, Iowa State University

Domino Variations

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Bob Bosch, Oberlin College

Invited Paper Session

Mathematical Diversity in Mathematical Biology

1:30 p.m. - 5:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 205

Mathematical biology is grab-bag description for using mathematics to understand biological phenomena. The math used is not restricted to a particular sub-discipline within math, but rather is as diverse as the biological systems themselves. In this session, the 2018 Project NExT’rs will showcase the diversity of mathematics used to better understanding biology. It is geared for an undergraduate audience.

Organizers:
Nicholas A. Battista, The College of New Jersey
Rebecca Everett, Haverford College

Comparing Intervention Strategies for Reducing Clostridium difficile Transmission: An Agent-Based Modeling Study

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Brittany Stephenson, Lewis University

Enhanced Coupling of Cilia Through Cell Rocking

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Forest Mannan, Colorado School of Mines

Parameter Informatics for Nonlinear Models

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Reginald McGee, College of the Holy Cross

Role of Resource Allocation and Transport in Emergence of Cross-feeding in Microbial Consortia

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Diana Schepens, Whitworth University

k-Foldability of RNA

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Garner Cochran, Berry College

Mixing and Pumping by Pairs of Helices in a Viscous Fluid

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Amy Buchmann, University of San Diego

Modeling the Impacts of Disturbances: What Can We Learn about Population Responses and Possible Management Strategies?

4:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m.
Amy Veprauskas, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Don’t Be Jelly: Modeling Effective Jet Propulsion

5:00 p.m. - 5:20 p.m.
Nicholas A. Battista, The College of New Jersey

Contributed Paper Session

Understanding Mathematics Through its History, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 207 & 208

Many mathematical concepts experienced a long and complex evolution before arriving on the pages of today’s undergraduate textbooks. Often, understanding some of this history can greatly enhance a student’s understanding of mathematics. Moreover, an exploration of history can show how mathematics is connected to the wider world of human inquiry, affected by the same cultural values and prejudices as other subjects. This session seeks to share interesting historical episodes or developments linked to undergraduate mathematics, for the benefit of students and teachers alike.

Organizer:
Erik Tou, University of Washington

Sponsor:
The Euler Society

The History of Calculus as a Guide to Teaching Calculus

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Eugene Boman, Penn State, Harrisburg Campus
Robert Rogers, SUNY, Fredonia

Because We Can: Proving the Generalized Binomial Theorem without Calculus

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Robert E. Bradley, Adelphi University

A Historical Approach to Infinite Series

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Alexander J. Barrios, Carleton College

The Totient Function Was Neither a Totient Nor a Function

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Erik R. Tou, University of Washington, Tacoma

Gnomonic Explorations: A Primary Source Project in Number Theory for Mathematics Majors, Elementary Teachers and Others

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Janet H. Barnett, Colorado State University - Pueblo

Mathematics in Astronomy at Harvard College Before 1839

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Amy Ackerberg-Hastings, Independent Scholar

Humanizing Mathematics Via Student-Generated Math History Plays

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Emily Dennett, Ohio State
Chris Bolognese, Columbus Academy

Challenging the Establishment

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Charlie Smith, Park University

Exploring Mathematics, Art, and History in Spain

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Mark A. Branson, Stevenson University

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching, Part D

1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 230 & 231

Inquiry-based learning (IBL) transforms students from consumers to producers of mathematics. IBL methods aim to develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and processes by putting students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use and effects of IBL methods for teaching and learning.

Organizers:
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Susan Crook, Loras College
Brian Katz, Augustana College
Eric Kahn, Bloomsburg University
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy

Sponsor:
The SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Adapting IBL Questions for Large Classrooms

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Mihai Nica, University of Toronto

Engaged IBL Group Work: Vertical Non-Permanent Surfaces and Horizontal Movable Pieces

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
V. Rani Satyam, Virginia Commonwealth University

Motivators and Characteristics of Creative Mathematical Inquiry: Aesthetics, Affect, and Epistemology

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Kerry O'Grady, Johns Hopkins University

Building Student-Community Ownership of Proof Validation

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Brian P. Katz, Smith College

Contributed Paper Session

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Mathematics, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 260, 261 & 262

National data trends indicate a need to shift representation in the mathematical sciences with respect to diversity, equity, and inclusion. In response, many departments and instructors have sought to understand the barriers that inhibit persistence and success in mathematics, particularly among underrepresented minority, first-generation, low-income, and female students. This session invites presenters to share how they engage diverse student populations.

Organizers:
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Ranthony A.C. Edmonds, The Ohio State University
Alison Marr, Southwestern University
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College

Women Who Count: Experiential Education in Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Jennifer R. Bowen, The College of Wooster

Mathematical Classroom Discussion of K-12 Emergent Bilinguals in North America Context: A Review of Literature (RESCHEDULED to SATURDAY)

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Ying Luo, The Pennsylvania State University

Relational Practices in Mathematics Classrooms (CANCELED)

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Helen E. Burn, Highline College
Eboni Zamani-Gallaher, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Vilma Mesa, University of Michigan
J. Luke Wood, San Diego State University

Community, Belonging, and the Putnam Exam

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Pat Devlin, Yale University

Program on Math Outreach in Panama

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Jeanette Shakalli, National Secretariat of Science, Technology and Innovation

Inclusive Teaching and Learning of Mathematics in an Afterschool Math Enrichment Program for Underrepresented Minority, First-Generation, Low-Income Students

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Alessandra Pantano, UC Irvine
Mark Yu, UC Irvine
Li-Sheng Tseng, UC Irvine

Early Access to Advanced Mathematics for Underrepresented Students

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Jacob Castaneda, Bridge to Enter Advanced Mathematics

Reaching Out: Introduction to Calculus

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
David Easdown, University of Sydney

Effective Teams: Helping Students Understand the Importance of Diversity and Inclusion Through Teaming

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Jenna P. Carpenter, Campbell University

Contributed Paper Session

Teaching Mathematics Through Games, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 206

Come see methods for engaging students in mathematics through the development or play of board, card, and video games. Developing a game often requires the application of mathematics and it also appears in how one plays the game. Presentations describe class activities, class projects, or undergraduate research applications of mathematics. This session will be of interest to gamers and instructors.

Organizers:
Heidi Hulsizer, Benedictine College
Nickolas Hein, Benedictine College
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University
Martha Byrne, Sonoma State University

Using Apples to Apples to teach Set Theory

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Michael Martinez, Charleston Southern University

Integrating Puzzles and General Problem Solving Techniques into Undergraduate Mathematics Classes

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Benjamin Peet, St. Martin's Univeristy

Undergraduate Research with Lights Out

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
William T. Jamieson, Southern New Hampshire University

World of Mathcraft: How Mathematical Analysis of Video Games Leads to Optimal Player Performance

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Joshua Steier, Seton Hall University

Mathematics in Interactive Fiction: A Beauty Cold and Austere

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Mike Spivey, University of Puget Sound

Activity Based Gaming

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Sarang Aravamuthan, FogLogic

Contributed Paper Session

Showcase of Modeling to Motivate Differential Equations, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 4:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 233

Differential equations is a pivotal STEM course. Student and faculty backgrounds, and departmental constraints provide for variations in the course. Modeling can be incorporated into any version to motivate the study of differential equations. Presenters will share modeling materials and data collection experiences that generate inquiry-oriented learning. Presenters may discuss the value of modeling, assessment techniques, pedagogical successes, and challenges.

Organizers:
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Mobile Apps that Enhance Modeling in Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Timothy Lucas, Pepperdine University

Modeling with Census Data: the United States and Guatemala

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Jean Marie Linhart, Central Washington University
Gary Epp, Central Washington University

Flutter Mode vs. Resonance

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Jiyeon Suh, Grand Valley State University
Ciana Witherell, Grand Valley State University

Modeling Ornate Box Turtle Shell Growth

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Tyler Skorczewski, University of Wisconsin Stout

Simple Walking in 2-dimensional Space: Model and Experiment

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Na Yu, Lawrence Technological University

Modeling Thermal Data with Differential Equations for Sports and Engineering

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Malgorzata A. Marciniak, City University of New York

Incorporating Projects into a Differential Equations Course: Torricelli’s Law of Fluid Flow

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Ibukun Amusan, Kentucky State University

Stability of Interconnected Automobile Platoons

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Hasala Senpathy K. Gallolu Kankanamalage, Roger Williams University

Contributed Paper Session

Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation, Part C

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 237 & 238

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at: http://mathfest2019.davidfailing.com/

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Russ Goodman, Central College
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Restructuring Lessons as an Antidote to Student Passivity in Introductory Courses

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Erin R. Moss, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Core Quantitative Rasoning: The Specifications Grading Version

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Lauren Sager, University of New Hampshire

Precalculus Active Learning Labs: Focus on Functions

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Linda Burks, Santa Clara University

Graded Homework in 100-level Mathematics Courses: Should the Students Decide?

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Laura R. Tinney, University of North Carolina Asheville
Cathy Whitlock, University of North Carolina Asheville

How Flipping the Classroom Led to Better Outcomes for College Algebra and Foundations of Quantitative Reasoning Students

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
Ralph Stikeleather, University of Cincinnati- Blue Ash College

Introducing the Notion of Variable to Young Children in Courses for Elementary Teachers

3:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Patricia Baggett, New Mexico State University
Andrzej Ehrenfeucht, University of Colorado

Teaching Elementary Statistics from A to Z

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Jason J. Molitierno, Sacred Heart University

Improving Student Ownership in Introductory Statistics Class through a Project-Based Approach

3:50 p.m. - 4:05 p.m.
Vinodh Kumar Chellamuthu, Dixie State University

Help! My Lesson Bombed: Recovering from a Classroom Failure

4:10 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
Anil Venkatesh, Ferris State University

Contributed Paper Sessions

Professional Development in Mathematics: Looking Back, Looking Forward, on the Occasion of the 25th Anniversary of MAA Project NExT, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:10 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom D

Since MAA Project NExT was founded 25 years ago, a generation of mathematicians have participated in it and other PD programs. How have those programs impacted teaching and learning in mathematics? How have the challenges faced by college math instructors changed? Looking forward, how do we prepare today’s math instructors for the changes to come in the next 25 years?

Organizers:
Dave Kung, St. Mary’s College of Mar yland
Julie Barnes, Western Carolina University
Alissa Crans, Loyola Marymount University
Matt DeLong, Marian University

Reflections on Lessons Learned from Project NExT

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University

Reflections of a Peach Dot

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Mary Shepherd, Northwest Missouri State University

The MAA Mentoring Network: Supporting Early Career Mathematicians

2:10 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University
Rachel Levy, Mathematical Association of America
Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University

The State of Professional Development in Higher Ed Mathematics: Today and What’s NExT

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Dave Kung, St. Mary's College of Maryland

Project NExT at Twenty Five and Counting

2:50 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
T Christine Stevens, American Mathematical Society

Panel Session

MAA Departmental Membership: Taking It to the Next Level

1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 263

MAA departmental membership is much more than free student memberships! Join panelists from a variety of institutional settings to discuss how to tailor the myriad benefits of departmental membership to your particular needs. Conferences, books, journals, Great Courses, the online Career Resource Center – the list is long. Come share your ideas and get inspiration for your own students and institution.

Organizer:
Kira Hamman, Penn State University

Panelists:
Ximena Catepillan, Millersville University
Joyati Debnath, Winona State University
Spencer Hamblen, McDaniel College
Alicia Prieto Langarica, Youngstown State University

Poster Session

General Contributed Poster Session III

1:30 p.m. - 2:15 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom B

Given last year’s success with the MAA Contributed Poster Session (CPS), the MAA is pleased to continue with this session at MathFest 2019 in Cincinnati. We will rotate the poster categories throughout the meeting and the number of rotations will depend on the number of accepted posters. The MAA will provide corkboards or trifolds for the posters – you just need to bring your poster.

Please consult this year's Call for Posters for more information on the sessions in general, and what to expect for submitting and preparing presentations

1. Riemann Sums Belong at the End of Integral Calculus, Not the Beginning

Robert R. Rogers, SUNY Fredonia

2. Take a Deep Breath and Behold the Mathematics

Mary B. Walkins, The Community College of Baltimore County

3. Revolution and Romance: Mathematics in the Romantic Age

Richard (Abe) Edwards, Michigan State University

4. Instruction Type and Student Major as They Relate to Student Success in College Level Developmental Mathematics Classes

Jean Coltharp, Missouri Southern State University

5. Confronting Underachievement in Introductory Math Classes: Improving Learning for All Students through Self-Regulation

Jane F. Reed, Way to Succeed

6. Calculus in Context - Results From Bringing Calculus and Physics Together

Kelly Black, University of Georgia
Guangming Yao, Clarkson University
Michael Ramsdell, Clarkson University
Craig Wiegert, University of Georgia

7. Mathematics of Paper Airplanes

Duk-Hyung Lee, Asbury University

8. Mathematics for Cybersecurity Majors (CANCELED)

Gregory V. Bard, University of Wisconsin-Stout

9. Emergent Symbolization as a Student Learning Goal: Gathering and Responding to Students' Mathematical Meanings

Alan O'Bryan, Arizona State University

10. Between the Two Cultures: Teaching Math and Art to Engineers (and Scientists and Mathematicians)

Joshua Holden, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

11.Quantitative Reasoning: Everyday Considerations for Exploring Mathematics

Sarah L. Mabrouk, Framingham State University

12. Breaking 'R' Code: A First Attempt at Implementing R in Quantitative Biology

Margaret Rahmoeller, Roanoke College

13. Differences in Educational Gain for Calculus Concepts

Daniel L. Kern, Florida Gulf Coast University
Galen Papkov, Florida Gulf Coast University

14. Math Mindset in Early Courses

Heidi Hulsizer, Benedictine College
Angela Broaddus, Benedictine College

15. Modeling and Assessment of Student Retention at Hendrix College

Chris Camfield, Hendrix College

16.The Application of the Microsoft Office Suite to Enhance Mathematics Learning

Diane Cass Lussier, Pima Community College
Daniel E. Plummer, Howard University

17. Positive Solutions to Singular Second Order BVPs for Dynamical Equations

Curtis Kunkel, University of Tennessee Martin

18. Breaking the Vicious Limit Cycle: Addiction Relapse-Recovery as a Fast-Slow Dynamical System

Jacob P. Duncan, Winona State University
Monica McGrath, Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame
Teresa Aubele-Futch, Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame

19. The Effect of an Environmental Toxin on Competing Species

Jennifer Miller, Bellarmine University

20. An Inverse Source Problem with an Integral Overdetermination

Sedar Ngoma, SUNY Geneseo

21. Pricing Variance Swap for a Discrete BN-S Model

Semere Kidane Gebresilasie, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Matthew Sears, Wentworth Institute of Technology

22.In to the Power Functions

Bianka Wang, Saginaw Valley State University
Hasan Al-Halees, Saginaw Valley State University

23.Equivalence Results for Implicit Junck-kirk Type Iterations

Hudson Akewe, University of Lagos

24. Using a Prerequisites Test to Improve Success in Applied Calculus

Nicholas Gewecke, Dalton State College

25.On the Existence of Fixed Points for Monotone Lipschitzian Mappings

Buthinah Bin Dehaish, University of Jeddah

26. Cotangent Averaging and Euler's Product Formula

Andrew Rich, Manchester University

27. Rainbow Geometry: Newton's Second Longbow

Dennis G. Collins, University of Puerto Rico - Mayaguez

28. The Transmission of Hindu-Arabic Numerals (CANCELED)

Chuck Lindsey, Florida Gulf Coast University

29. Nineteenth Century Normal Mathematics

Jeff Johannes, SUNY Geneseo

30. Visualizing the Transformative Role of Mathematics in the Fin de Siècle Culture with Social Network Analysis

Donna Beers, Simmons University

31. On-cognitive Psychological Variables of Gender Inequalities in Developmental and Introductory Mathematics Courses

Camille A. McKayle, University of the Virgin Islands
Nadia Monrose, University of the Virgin Islands
Robert Stolz, University of the Virgin Islands

32. Adding Synthesis Tests to Mastery Based Testing

Haley A. Yaple, Carthage College

33. Dialogical Learning

Steven Wilkinson, Northern Kentucky University
Taraneh Wilkinson, Foundation for Religious Studies, Bologna, Italy

34. Explanation, Existence, and Indispensability

May Mei, Denison University
Seth Chin-Parker, Denison University
Sam Cowling, Denison University

35. The MPWR Seminar: Mentoring and Partnerships for Women in RUME

Megan Wawro, Virginia Tech
Jess Ellis Hagman, Colorado State University
Stacy Musgrave, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

36. Mathematicians’ Perceptions of their Teaching

Christian Orr-Woods, Rutgers University

Workshop

Mathematics of Gerrymandering: Engaging and Authentic Tasks with Civic Significance

1:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 201

Gerrymandering refers to manipulating district boundaries to provide a political advantage and can be studied from many mathematical perspectives. This workshop will engage participants in three hands-on tasks, accessible to a general audience, exploring the mathematics of gerrymandering. The tasks include redistricting puzzles, examination of a numerical measure of gerrymandering (the efficiency gap), and an investigation of district compactness.

Organizers:
Kimberly Corum, Towson University
Sandy Spitzer, Towson University
James Rutter, University of Virginia
Julia Daniel, Towson University
Alexandria Wilhelm, Towson University

Undergraduate Student Activity

Color Addition Across the Spectrum of Mathematics

1:30 p.m. – 2:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom C

In this talk we consider two family style games whose rules are mathematical in nature, but do not require any explicit mathematics, beyond simple counting, during game play. Both games are based on color mixing rules which yield a nice geometric visual presentation and admit several mathematical interpretations. We will discuss the nature of these color mixing rules, explore the related mathematical structures and see how all of this is related to finger paints and lightbulbs.

Presenter: Ron Taylor, Berry College

Other Mathematical Session

Alder Award Session

2:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

The MAA established the Henry L. Alder Award for Distinguished Teaching by a Beginning College or University Mathematics Faculty Member to honor beginning college or university faculty members whose teaching has been extraordinarily successful and whose effectiveness in teaching undergraduate mathematics is shown to have influence beyond their own classrooms. Each year, at most three college or university teachers are honored with this national award. The awardees are invited to make a presentation in this session. The session is moderated by MAA President Michael Dorff.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the School

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
PJ Couch, Lamar University

"The Undergraduate Mathematics Classroom as a Publishing House: A New Type of Learning Community"

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Pamela Harris, Williams College

Teaching with H

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Alicia Prieto, Youngstown State University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

2:30 p.m. – 6:05 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Rooms 210, 211, 235, 251

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

2:30 p.m. – 6:05 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Rooms 236, 264

Pi Mu Epsilon student members who wish to represent their chapters as student speakers or official delegates should visit the PME website at http://pme-math.org/ for more information.

Please note: all student presenters are required to be registered for MAA MathFest.

Organizer: Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Panel Session

Jumping into IBL Teaching: Reflections by First-Time Practitioners

3:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 263

Curious about Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) but not sure where to start? So were they! In this panel, faculty who have recently taught an IBL-style course for the first time will reflect on their experiences. Panelists will share a typical day in the classroom along with lessons learned about what worked well and what they would change in the future. Courses represented will range from entry-level to upper divisional.

Organizers:
Angelynn Alvarez, SUNY Potsdam
Sarah Wolff, Denison University
Robert Kelvey, The College of Wooster

Panelists:
Emily Barnard, Northeastern University
Judit Kardos, The College of New Jersey
Sarah Nelson, Lenoir-Rhyne University
Kristen Pueschel, Penn State University New Kensington
Adam Giambrone, Elmira College

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (SIGMAA IBL)

Town Hall Session

Quantitative Literacy and Social Justice

3:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 201

At the 2019 Joint Mathematics Meetings, Dave Kung and Kira Hamman called for a need to teach mathematics and quantitative literacy with an eye toward social justice. As part of their presentation, they not only reiterated the importance of promoting quantitative literacy for social justice (and vice versa), but they also pushed the audience to consider diverse and potentially divisive issues ranging from who “receives” quantitative literacy on their campus to how students are positioned in mathematics classrooms. Their remarks accentuate that the relationship between quantitative literacy and social justice is complex, and that there is much for the mathematics and quantitative literacy communities to consider as we teach in an era of alternative facts, dueling memes, and politically charged classrooms.

SIGMAA-QL would like to invite all members of the mathematics community who are interested in issues of social justice as well as pathways toward a quantitatively literate society to a town hall discussion at MathFest 2019 to follow up on some of these questions. In particular at this session we hope to start a much needed conversation about the roles people of mathematics can play in promoting quantitative literacy for social justice (and vice versa). Issues we would like to discuss range from teaching mathematics for social justice, to the role of QL in charting a path towards a more just society, to the future of SIGMAA-QL as an ambassador of mathematicians interested in these issues. The organizers will come in with questions to initiate and facilitate the conversation, but we invite everyone interested to come and make their voices be heard.

Organizers:
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Mark A. Branson, Stevenson University
Catherine Crockett, Point Loma Nazarene University
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Luke Tunstall, Trinity University

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on Quantitative Literacy(SIGMAA QL)

Poster Session

PosterFest 2019: Scholarship by Early Career Mathematicians

3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom B

This poster session and networking event allows early career mathematicians to present and discuss their scholarly activities with senior mathematicians in an informal atmosphere. Untenured faculty and graduate students are especially encouraged to apply. Examples of scholarly activities suitable for this poster session include expository work, preliminary reports, scholarship of teaching and learning, and research reports. Please note that undergraduate submissions will not be accepted. Alternate opportunities for undergraduate students are available and can be found on the conference website. Questions regarding this session should be sent to the organizers.

Organizers:
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University
Holly Attenborough, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Sponsors:
The MAA Committee on Early Career Mathematicians (ECM)
MAA Committee on Graduate Students
Young Mathematicians Network
MAA Project NExT

Minicourse

Minicourse 5. Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings, Part B

3:40 p.m. – 5:40 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 204

We introduce hands-on, practical art puzzles that motivate the mathematics of projective geometry---the study of properties invariant under projective transformations. On the art side, we explore activities in perspective drawing or photography. These activities inform the mathematical side, where we introduce activities in problem solving and proof suitable for a sophomore-level proofs class. No artistic experience is required.

Organizer:
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College,

Sponsor:
SIGMAA-ARTS

Minicourse

Minicourse 6. Mathematical Card Magic, Part B

3:40 p.m. – 5:40 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom A

A modern survey of self-working mathematical card magic, from classics such as binary and Gilbreath principle based entertainments to original principles and effects discovered by the presenter and previously shared at MAA.org. A special feature will be two-person card magic based on subtle mathematical communication principles: discrete mathematics, combinatorics and elementary probability. No prerequisites, and no sleight of hand skills are required.

Organizer:
Colm Mulcahy, Spelman College

Invited Address

NAM David Harold Blackwell Lecture and National Association of Mathematicians Celebration

Dudeney's No Three-In-Line Problem: Problem, Solutions, Conditions, Progress, and Conjectures

4:00 p.m. - 5:45 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Johnny L. Houston, Elizabeth City State University

In 1917, Henry Dudeney, an Englishman who had done some intriguing things with mathematical puzzles and games, posed an interesting question for persons interested in discrete geometry. Let an n x n grid be given in the Euclidean plane for any natural number n, what is the maximum number of points that can be identified in the grid so that no three of these points are in the same line (no 3 colinear). For various natural numbers n, solutions have been discovered and certain conditions have been encountered.

The presenter discusses many of these solutions and conditions. For large natural numbers n, even for some n < 60, progress (or lack of progress) is being made slowly. By the Pigeon Hole Principle, the maximum number of such points that can exist is 2n. The problem of finding for which n this value is reached is known as the No-Three-In-Line Problem. Several conjectures exist. These conjectures and their motivations are discussed as well as some related problems. However, the No-Three-In-Line Problem is still an open problem.

The year 2019 is the centennial year of the honoree for which this lecture was named. The presenter will also discuss the life and contributions of David H. Blackwell.

Additionally, a light reception will follow the lecture to celebrate the National Association of Mathematicians's Golden anniversary.

Social Event

Estimathon!

4:00 p.m. - 5:45 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 232

They're called Fermi problems...
How heavy is the Eiffel Tower?
How many prime numbers have distinct digits?
How many calories would you be eating if you had "one of everything" at the Cheesecake Factory?

If you're looking for a mindbending mixture of math and trivia, look no further! Jane Street Capital presents The Estimathon contest: teams will have 30 minutes to work on 13 problems, ranging from totally trivial to positively Putnamesque. Can your team beat the all-time best score?? The top teams will receive prizes! As in past years, we will run 2 contests. Feel free to show up to either one!

(Please show up 15 minutes before the start time of the contest you want to join.)
Our target schedule is as follows:

4:00 pm. Welcome, overview of rules and scoring.
4:15 pm. Estimathon contest #1
5:00 pm. Estimathon contest #2

Organizer: Andy Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Other Mathematical Session

SCUDEM Gathering and Information Session

4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 236

SCUDEM-SIMIODE Challenge Using Differential Equations Modeling Gathering of interested colleagues interested in host site coordinator issues, team registration, coaching teams, etc. to learn about SCUDEM IV 2091 event to be held on 9 November 2019. See www.simiode.org/scudem for complete details.

Organizer:
Brian Winkel, Director of SIMIODE (Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations)

Social Event

Pi Mu Epsilon Banquet

6:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom C

All PME members and their supporters are welcome. See the registration form for more information on this ticketed event.

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA TASHM Business Meeting, Reception, Sliffe Award Winners Celebration, & Guest Lecture

Using History and Education Research to Shape the Calculus Curriculum

David Bressoud, Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 237 & 238

This talk will explain how the historical development of calculus should be used to inform its instruction. The standard order of the four big ideas—limits then derivatives then integrals then series—is wrong both historically and pedagogically. In addition, the standard models for derivatives and integrals, slopes of tangents lines and areas under curves, erect obstacles in the path of many students. Drawing on history and recent research in undergraduate mathematics education, this talk will make the case for calculus introduced first as problems of accumulation (integration), then ratios of change (differentiation), then sequences of partial sums (series), and finally the algebra of inequalities (limits).

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA SportsBusiness Meeting, Reception, and Guest Panel

Undergraduate Research in Mathematics & Sports

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 263

We will discuss ways in which faculty have mentored undergraduate projects related to mathematics and sports. Faculty will describe the various types of student research that was conducted, including interdisciplinary work, applied mathematics, sports analytics, and mathematics education. We hope that this will serve as a springboard for ideas on future work that can be conducted regarding mathematics and sports. We welcome all faculty and students to share their experiences and contribute to our discussion.

Panelists:
Daniel Dobbs, Trine University
R. Drew Pasteur, College of Wooster
Tetyana Berezovski, St. Joseph’s University

Moderator:
Diana Cheng, Towson University

Social Event

MAA Ice Cream Social

8:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom C

Besides cake and ice cream, we will recognize all students who gave talks in the MAA Student Paper Sessions, and award prizes for the best of them. All are invited.


Saturday, August 3

Registration & Information

8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom Lobby

Other Mathematical Session

PIC Math Showcase

Student Presentations

8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom C

PIC Math prepares mathematical sciences students for industrial careers by engaging them in research problems that come directly from industry. In this session students who participated in PIC Math will give talks and poster presentations about their research, and mathematicians in industry will talk about what it is like to work in industry and what students need to do to succeed.

  • 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.: Eight students talks at 15-minute intervals
  • 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.: Two mathematicians from industry speak in 30-minute intervals
  • 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Break
  • 12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.: PIC Math student poster session

Sponsors: PIC Math is an MAA program that is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF grant DMS-1722275) and the National Security Agency (NSA).

Other Mathematical Session

MAA MathFest Mentoring Workshop for Women (MMWW)

8:30 a.m - 1:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 201

A half-day workshop providing information for undergraduate women interested in advanced study in mathematics. Information will be provided on graduate study in mathematics, careers available to women with an advanced mathematics degree, and constructing a life as a mathematician.

Organizer:
Deanna Haunsperger, Carleton College

Exhibit Hall

9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom B

Invited Address

MAA James R.C. Leitzel Lecture

What's at Stake in Rehumanizing Mathematics?

9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Rochelle Gutiérrez, University of Illinois

Embracing an "equity" standpoint that has been poorly defined (Gutiérrez, 2002) or constantly shifting (NCTM, 2008) has led to a state of “tinkering” as opposed to real change within mathematics (Gutiérrez, 2017). That is, our progress has often focused on, and ended with, closing the achievement gap or recruiting more diverse students into the mathematical sciences, but not trying to radically reimagine a mathematics that supports students, teachers, and members of society to thrive, something I refer to as Rehumanizing Mathematics. This approach begins with 1) acknowledging some of the dehumanizing experiences in mathematics for students, teachers, and citizens and 2) designing ways for people to be provided with windows and mirrors onto the world and relating to each other with dignity through mathematics. This focus on Rehumanizing Mathematics allows us to think differently about student misconceptions, teachers as identity workers, the histories of mathematics, our bodies in relation to mathematics, and why it is not just that diverse people need mathematics but mathematics needs diverse people. In this talk, I explore “what’s at stake” along two dimensions: 1) what it means for teachers, students, and society if we do not rehumanize mathematics and 2) what knowledge bases, sensibilities, and forms of risk taking it will require from us as mathematicians (and mathematics educators) if we commit deeply to rehumanizing mathematics.

Invited Paper Session

Commutative Algebra

9:00 a..m. - 11:50 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 200

Commutative algebra is a central discipline at the intersection of algebraic geometry, number theory, combinatorics, and so on. Many of the foundations were laid by Emmy Noether. Modern commutative algebra combines techniques from computational symbolic algebra, combinatorics, graph theory, and homological and homotopical algebra. The session will cover many flavors with a broad appeal towards the subject's natural influence.

Organizers:
Irena Swanson, Reed College
Lance Miller, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Convergence of Rees Valuations

9:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.
Matthew Toeniskoetter, Florida Atlantic University

An Algebraic Condition that Allows Us to Do Intersection Theory

9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Patricia Klein, University of Kentucky

On Flavors of Factorization in Commutative Rings with Zero Divisors

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.
Ranthony A.C. Edmonds, Ohio State University

Direct-sum Decompositions of Modules: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (aka Interesting)

10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Nicholas Baeth, Franklin and Marshall College

Syzygy - When Submodules Align

11:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.
Courtney Gibbons, Hamilton College

Contributed Paper Session

Enhance Your Teaching through Best Practices That Align with the Instructional Practices Guide, Part B

9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 232

Speakers in this session share teaching innovations through a scholarly lens by pegging their work to specific evidence-based practices in the MAA Instructional Practices (IP) Guide. Each talk will clearly lay out both the pedagogical technique as well as how it pertains to at least one of the subsections of the IP Guide.

Organizers:
Carolyn A. Yackel, Mercer University
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University

Sponsor:
Committee on the Teaching of Undergraduate Mathematics (CTUM)

Writing to Promote Understanding in a First College Math Course

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Daniel Schultheis, Smith College

From Formative to Summative: Using a Proof Portfolio to Teach Proof-Writing

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Matt Boelkins, Grand Valley State University

An Interactive, Digital, Annotation Platform as a Mechanism for Out-of-Class Engagement, Community-Building, and Peer Instruction

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Abigail Higgins, Sacramento State University

Building Social, Teaching, and Cognitive Presence in the Face-to-face Classroom: Practices Borrowed from Online Instruction that Align with the MAA IP Guide

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Andrew George, Penn State Erie

Active Learning in Large Lecture Courses

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Bobby W. Ramsey, The Ohio State University

Fostering Student Engagement

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Lew Ludwig, Denison University

Developing Persistence and Growth Mindset through Formative Assessment

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Zoë Misiewicz, SUNY Oneonta and SUNY Oswego

Maintaining Instructional Best Practices in a Multi-Section Coordinated Course Environment

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Ryan Therkelsen, University of Cincinnati
Noel DeJarnette, University of Cincinnati

Teaching Linear Algebra with an Inquiry-Based Textbook and Applications

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Steven Schlicker, Grand Valley State University
Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and Sports

9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 206

The expanding availability of play-by-play statistics and video-based spatial data have led to innovative research using techniques from across the mathematical sciences, with impacts on strategy and player evaluation. Other areas of interest include ranking methods, predictive models, physics-based analysis, etc. Research presentations, expository talks, and contributions related to curriculum or pedagogy are all welcome. With a broad audience in mind, talks should be accessible to undergraduate mathematics majors, and projects involving undergrads are particularly encouraged for submission.

Organizer:
Drew Pasteur, College of Wooster

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on Mathematics and Sports (SIGMAA Sports)

Ranking Sports Teams with Perron-Frobenius Eigenvectors

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Nathaniel M. Iverson, Siena Heights University

Ranking Major League Pitchers and Batters Using the Oracle Method, an Update

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Tom Tegtmeyer, Trinity University

Predicted Performance Using Bayesian Inference

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Ollie Nanyes, Bradley University

Building and Using a Baseball Simulator to Analyze Batting Orders

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Paul von Dohlen, William Paterson University

Using Sports to Introduce Game Theory

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Daniel Shifflet, Clarion University of Pennsylvania

NFL Betting and Expected Value

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Jathan Austin, Salisbury University

Faster and Higher over Ice: Biomechanical Principles Used to Push the Boundaries in Figure Skating

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Diana Cheng, Towson University

Player Course Interactions on the PGA Tour

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Roland Minton, Roanoke College

Envy-Free March Madness Bracketing

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
R. Drew Pasteur, College of Wooster

Contributed Paper Session

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Mathematics, Part C

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 237 & 238

National data trends indicate a need to shift representation in the mathematical sciences with respect to diversity, equity, and inclusion. In response, many departments and instructors have sought to understand the barriers that inhibit persistence and success in mathematics, particularly among underrepresented minority, first-generation, low-income, and female students. This session invites presenters to share how they engage diverse student populations.

Organizers:
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Ranthony A.C. Edmonds, The Ohio State University
Alison Marr, Southwestern University
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College

Mathematical Classroom Discussion of K-12 Emergent Bilinguals in North America Context: A Review of Literature (NEW TIME)

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Ying Luo, The Pennsylvania State University

Exploring Equity in Co-Requisite First Year Mathematics and Statistics

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Jennifer Elyse Clinkenbeard, California State University Monterey Bay
Alison Lynch, California State University Monterey Bay
Peri Shereen, California State University Monterey Bay

Recruitment, Resilience, and Reaching Higher via Early Research Experiences

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Roberto Soto, California State University, Fullerton

The Limit Does Not Exist: The Value of Math Education in Prison (NEW TIME)

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Simone Sisneros-Thiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
M. Sean Lawless, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Mario Rubio, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Joshua Jeishing Wen, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Bryan Dean, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The NREUP and Howard's Program (CANCELED)

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Dennis Davenport, Howard University

Supporting the Transition to Undergraduate Mathematics: Collaborative Learning and Mentoring in Teams

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Nathan N. Alexander, Morehouse College

Conversations Across the Divide

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Linda Braddy, Tarrant County College

Contributed Paper Session

Building Teaching Teams: Professional Development in Departments

9:00 a.m. - 10:40 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 230 & 231

Research has shown that professional development programs play an important role in developing instructors who are more student-focused, but financial constraints, time limitations, and lack of buy-in often serve as barriers to offering these types of programs. This session will showcase a wide range of professional development programs situated within mathematics departments.

Organizers:
Sarah Mayes-Tang, University of Toronto
Jessica Deshler, West Virginia University

On Fire: FFLAME and the ECCP

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Jeffrey Kurtz, Denison University
May Mei, Denison University

Job Embedded Professional Development in an Introductory Statistics Course

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Sharona Krinsky, California State University Los Angeles

Providing Mentorship and Professional Development at a Metropolitan University

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Emily Hendryx, University of Central Oklahoma
Kristi Karber, University of Central Oklahoma

Starting a Calculus Community of Practice

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Sarah Mayes-Tang, University of Toronto
Mihai Nica, University of Toronto

Creating Overlapping Communities of Practice

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Elizabeth Miller, The Ohio State University
Jenny Sheldon, The Ohio State University

Contributed Paper Session

My Favorite Number Theory Proof

9:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 207 & 208

Presenters share favorite proofs suitable for introductory proofs or undergraduate number theory courses, giving the complete proof, discussing how the proof fits into the course, providing information regarding prerequisite topics, areas of difficulty, and making the proof accessible for students. Modifications to the proof over time, historical information, and explorations/demonstrations used to make related theorems/topics comprehensible for students are discussed.

Organizers:
Sarah L. Mabrouk, Framingham State University

Divisibility, Modular Arithmetic, and Induction, Oh My!

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Martha H. Byrne, Sonoma State University

Various Teaching Strategies to Prove that a Certain Conjecture is Equivalent to Goldbach’s Conjecture

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Kristi Karber, University of Central Oklahoma

Fermat's Bracelets and Wilson's Polygons: Seeing Two Foundational Theorems Geometrically

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Adam J. Hammett, Cedarville University

Euler's Criterion

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Scott Williams, University of Central Oklahoma

Seeding Polynomials for Quadratic Congruences Modulo Prime Powers

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Larry Lehman, University of Mary Washington

The Exact Power of p dividing n!

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Scott Zinzer, Aurora University

A Silver Version of Dirichlet's Bronze Approximation Theorem

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Andrew J. Simoson, King University

Contributed Paper Session

Math + X: Mathematics Courses, Curriculum, and Projects Serving Professional Disciplines, Part B

9:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 260, 261, &262

Mathematics departments have provided content supporting partner and professional disciplines for decades. For disciplines such as business and engineering, numerous resources support a contextualized curriculum. This session highlights curricular elements for professions, disciplines, and math pathways where supporting materials for contextualized student learning are lacking. Of particular interest are successful examples of nontraditional curricula that match students’ future work environment.

Organizers:
Francisco Savina, Charles A. Dana Center, University of Texas at Austin
Stuart Boersma, Central Washington University

Matrix Algebra and Multivariate Calculus Modules to Prepare Students for Data Science Graduate Programs

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Hong P. Liu, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Keshav Acharya, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Math+CEMA: Computational and Engineering Mathematics Concentration for Mathematics Majors at NC Central University

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Alade O. Tokuta, NC Central University
RN Uma, NC Central University
Gaolin Z. Milledge, NC Central University
Xinyu Huang, NC Central University

A Faculty Learning Community to Support Mathematics for Students in Nursing, Social Work, and Business

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
Victor I. Piercey, Ferris State University
Rhonda Bishop, Ferris State University (Nursing)
Mischelle Stone, Ferris State University (Social Work)

Math for the Health Sciences

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Magdalena Luca, MCPHS University

Intentional Course Design for Project-Based Courses

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a. m.
Jessica Stewart Kelly, Christopher Newport University

BIG Problems in Mathematics

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Megan Sawyer, Southern New Hampshire University

How the Government Shutdown Derailed My Plans for a Series of Introduction to Statistics Projects and How I Got the Projects Back on Track

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
John Noonan, Mount Vernon Nazarene University

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, Gambling and Sports, Part C

9:00 a.m. - 11:40 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 233

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, gambling, and sports provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates or examples of the use of the solutions of these problems in the undergraduate classroom are encouraged.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (Rec SIGMAA)

Equilibrium Patterns in the Candy-Sharing Circle

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Ryan Higginbottom, Washington & Jefferson College

Frogs + Puzzles = Algorithmic Thinking

9:20 a.m. - 9:35 a.m.
Edmund A. Lamagna, University of Rhode Island

Padovan, Pascal, and Proofs Without Words

9:40 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.
David Nacin, William Paterson University

Analyzing Playing Card Cryptosystems

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Eric Landquist, Kutztown University
Isaac Reiter, Kutztown University

KRYPTOS: A Cryptanalysis Contest for Undergraduates

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Stuart Boersma, Central Washington University
Cheryl Beaver, Western Oregon University

World's First 19-Sided Perfect Enneadecagon Construction

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Genghmun Eng, Self

Fibonacci and Adaptive Strategies to Beat the Streak!

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Michael Nathanson, Saint Mary's College of California

Systematic Counting, Binomial Coefficients, Playoff Scenarios and the 150th Anniversary of The Cincinnati Reds

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Jay L. Schiffman, Rowan University

Panel Session

Building a Community of Practice to Prepare Graduate Students to Teach Undergraduate Mathematics

9:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 263

CoMInDS is an NSF funded MAA project whose purpose is to support faculty who are preparing graduate students to teach undergraduate mathematics, including providing workshops, establishing a professional community of practice and developing an online resource suite of instructional materials. In this panel, we will show how CoMInDS is using MAA's new community platform to support this work.

Organizer:
Jack Bookman, Duke University

Panelists:
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University
Teri J Murphy, University of Cincinnati
Jack Bookman, Duke University
Emily Braley, Harvard University

Workshop

Get the Facts Out!

9:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 205

Many math and science majors, despite an interest in teaching, do not pursue it as a career. Why? Research shows they (and their college faculty!) may hold beliefs such as: teacher pay is a lot less than other jobs, teachers can’t retire, and teachers are unhappy. Get the Facts Out resources can help counter these myths with data from empirical studies. This workshop will share these resources as well as offer assistance in creating materials to use in your own location.

Get the Facts Out is an NSF-funded collaborative effort between the Mathematical Association of America, the Colorado School of Mines, the American Physical Society, the American Chemical Society, and others.

Organizers:
Judith Covington, Louisiana State University
Christina Eubanks-Turner, Loyola Marymount University
Ben Ford, Sonoma State University
Timothy Hendrix, Meredith College
Rose Zbiek, Pennsylvania State University

Graduate Student Paper Session

Great Talks for a General Audience: Coached Presentations by Graduate Students

9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom D and Room 211

While graduate students gain experience speaking about their research to experts in their field, many do not have the opportunity to present their research to non-experts. This session gives graduate students the chance to give a research talk, aimed at sophomore mathematics majors. Participants work with session organizers throughout the creation of their talks.

Organizers
Jim H. Freeman, Cornell College
May Mei, Denison University
Ranjan Rohatgi, Saint Mary's College
Aliza Steurer, Dominican University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Graduate Students

Session for Undergraduate Students

USA Problem Solving Competition

9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 264

This event is the finals of The Problem Solving Competition. Universities and colleges that participate monthly on their own campuses by holding problem solving contests are invited to send a contestant. Each contestant will be required to solve a series of mathematical problems. Based upon the outcome, a champion along with second through sixth place winners will be named.

Organizer: Richard Neal, The American Society for Mathematics (ASFM)

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Complex Dynamics and Elliptic Curves, Lecture III

10:00 a.m. - 10:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Laura DeMarco, Northwestern University

In a series of three talks, I will present connections between recent research in dynamical systems and the classical theory of elliptic curves and rational points. On the dynamical side -- specifically in the study of iteration of rational functions (Julia sets, bifurcations, the Mandelbrot set) -- the first connections were observed about 100 years ago. On the arithmetic side, it was probably the 1960s when dynamical ideas were first used as tools to understand the arithmetic geometry of elliptic curves and higher-dimensional varieties. My goal is to provide an overview of how these relationships developed and where they have brought us today. The three lectures will be independent.

Other Mathematical Session

Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom B

The Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival (JRMF) consists of interactive and varied mathematical games, puzzles, problems, and activities. Participants choose which activity to engage and for how long. Facilitators guide but don't demonstrate or teach so participants can discover, explore, and enjoy mathematics. The event provides an opportunity for faculty and teachers to learn how they could host a JRMF locally.

Organizers
Japheth Wood, Bard College
Thomas Clark, Dordt College

Other Mathematical Session

PIC Math Showcase

Industry Speakers

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom C

PIC Math prepares mathematical sciences students for industrial careers by engaging them in research problems that come directly from industry. In this session students who participated in PIC Math will give talks and poster presentations about their research, and mathematicians in industry will talk about what it is like to work in industry and what students need to do to succeed.

  • 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.: Eight students talks at 15-minute intervals
  • 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.: Two mathematicians from industry speak in 30-minute intervals
  • 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Break
  • 12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.: PIC Math student poster session

Sponsors: PIC Math is an MAA program that is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF grant DMS-1722275) and the National Security Agency (NSA).

Contributed Paper Session

Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation, Part D

10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 205

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at: http://mathfest2019.davidfailing.com/

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Russ Goodman, Central College
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Introduction to Proof Techniques in a Geometry Course

10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Carol Bell, Northern Michigan University

Project-Based Learning in Analysis

10:50 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Kevin Gerstle, Hillsdale College

An Alternate Method for Project Presentation in a Math Course

11:10 a.m. - 11:25 a.m.
Abigail Bishop, Iona College

Quantitative Consulting: An Interdisciplinary PIC Math Course

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Catie Patterson, Austin College

Building Course Embedded Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) in a Mathematics Major Pathway

11:50 a.m. - 12:10 p.m.
Lipika Deka, California State University Monterey Bay
Jeffrey Wand, California State University Monterey Bay
Peri Shereen, California State University Monterey Bay

Panel Session

Graduate School in Mathematics: What’s it Like, and How Do You Get In?

10:30 a.m. - 11:50 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 263

This panel is for undergraduates considering graduate school in the mathematical sciences. Graduate students in mathematics must take courses, pass qualifying exams, write a thesis, and serve as a Teaching Assistant. We discuss how these may vary from school to school and then focus on the application process: What do you need to apply? What does it take to get in? How many schools should you apply to? When will you hear? etc. Panelists will include several graduate chairs and current graduate students.

Organizer:
Ruth Haas, University of Hawaii

Panelists:
Michael Goldberg, University of Cincinnati
Richard McGehee, University of Minnesota
Laura Wells, Notre Dame
Craig Zirbel, Bowling Green State University

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

A Vision of Multivariable Calculus

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Robert Ghrist, University of Pennsylvania

This talk will address certain challenges in teaching multivariable calculus. Classical texts emphasize calculus in dimensions two or three, based on 19th and 20th century applications to physics. At present, many of our students are more motivated by data and systems in higher dimensions. How can a calculus course best adapt to these needs, without overwhelming students (or professors)? This talk will outline a plan for increasing both the dimension and sophistication of multivariable calculus instruction with the use of video. Topics covered will include the use of visualization, matrix algebra, and differential forms.

SIGMAA Activity

UR SIGMAA Guest Panel and Lunch

11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 237 & 238

Choosing good research problems to work on with undergraduate students is an art. In creating a research experience, a mentor must ask themselves a variety of questions. Can my students work in my research area, or do we need to explore a new area together? Will my students be able to start thinking about problems in my chosen field immediately, or will they need to learn some background material first? What kinds of questions will be too hard, leading to a frustrating lack of progress? What kinds of questions will be too easy, leaving my students with too much free time on their hands? In general, what are some good qualities to look for in a research problem for students? A panel of successful undergraduate research mentors will share their experiences to begin a broader conversation on this topic that can continue over food and drinks, provided by the UR SIGMAA.

Moderator:
Anant Godbole, East Tennessee State University

Panelists:
Vinodh Chellamuthu, Dixie State University
Dominic Klyve, Central Washington University
Suzanne Lenhart, University of Tennessee Knoxville
Lara Pudwell, Valparaiso University

Poster Session

PIC Math Showcase

Poster Session

12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom C

PIC Math prepares mathematical sciences students for industrial careers by engaging them in research problems that come directly from industry. In this session students who participated in PIC Math will give talks and poster presentations about their research, and mathematicians in industry will talk about what it is like to work in industry and what students need to do to succeed.

  • 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.: Eight students talks at 15-minute intervals
  • 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.: Two mathematicians from industry speak in 30-minute intervals
  • 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Break
  • 12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.: PIC Math student poster session

Sponsors: PIC Math is an MAA program that is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF grant DMS-1722275) and the National Security Agency (NSA).

Committee Meeting

MAA Business Meeting

1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom D

The meeting is organized by MAA Secretary James Sellers, Penn State University, and is chaired by MAA President Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University

Invited Address

Martin Gardner Lecture

Recreational Mathematics and Computer Science: Martin Gardner's Influence on Research

2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Grand Ballroom A

Erik Demaine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Martin Gardner's beautiful writing about fascinating mathematics, puzzles, and magic tricks has attracted and inspired many people to become mathematicians. At an even deeper level, Martin's writings highlighted exciting research directions and posed open problems which directly influenced mathematical research. Much of my own research was deeply influenced by Martin Gardner, in both recreational mathematics and a branch I call "recreational computer science". While most of this research may have started out recreational, many of the results also have practical applications. I will give a tour of many examples of Gardner's writings and how it inspired new research, from paper folding to mazes to penny puzzles to polyomino packing to magic. I encourage you all to read more Martin Gardner and look for more unsolved research questions and directions.

Contributed Paper Session

Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation, Part E

3:00 p.m. - 5:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 205

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at: http://mathfest2019.davidfailing.com/

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Russ Goodman, Central College
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology

A Calculus Study: Class Preparation Worksheets

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Sarah Ann Fleming, Belmont University

Manipulative Calculus: Active Learning with 3D Models

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Stepan Paul, Harvard University
Janet Chen, Harvard University

The Transformation of a Luddite: Using Technology Outside of the Classroom Setting

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
John Prather, Ohio University

Full Speed Ahead: A Day 1 Calculus Activity

4:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Benjamin Wilson, Stevenson University

The Challenges - and Successes - of Remediation in Calculus

4:20 p.m. - 4:35 p.m.
Paul N. Runnion, Missouri S&T

Collaborative Calculation (CoCalc) in the Classroom

4:40 p.m. - 4:55 p.m.
Michelle L. Isenhour, Naval Postgraduate School

Interacting with Partial Derivatives

5:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Tevian Dray, Oregon State University
David Roundy, Oregon State University
Aaron Wangberg, Winona State University

Workshop

Origami Boxes Full of Mathematics

3:00 p.m. – 4:20 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 201

Origami can be described as mathematics in action! In this workshop we will construct an origami box from a rectangular sheet of paper and explore the relationship between the dimensions of the sheet and the dimensions of the constructed box. The mathematics involved with this activity draws upon several of branches of mathematics such as algebra, geometry and calculus.

Organizer:
Arsalan Wares, Valdosta State University

Minicourse

Minicourse 1. Beyond Traditional Grading Schemes, Part B

3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Junior Ballroom A

Mastery grading is an assessment approach in which students are provided clear learning objectives and grades are directly based on students' ability to demonstrate complete mastery of these objectives by the end of the semester. Recent trends indicate this grading structure encourages a growth-mindset, reduces test anxiety, and improves student gains. This minicourse is designed for new practitioners.

Organizers:
Jessica O’Shaughnessy, Shenandoah University
Jeb Collins, Mary Washington University
Amanda Harsey, Lewis University
Alyssa Hoofnagle, Wittenberg University
Mike Jansen, Dordt College

Sponsor:
MAA Committee on Assessment

Minicourse

Minicourse 2. Creating a Purposeful Student Learning Experience, Part B

3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 204

Do your requirements for your departmental majors constitute an integrated framework for student success, or are they just a set of individual classes? Do your faculty work together effectively to achieve desired outcomes and to assess your progress? Do you strategically incorporate experiences outside the classroom in student learning? This minicourse will guide you in creating a learning-focused departmental culture.

Organizers:
Dan Callon, Franklin College
John Boardman, Franklin College
Paul Fonstad, Franklin College
Justin Gash, Franklin College
Stacy Hoehn, Franklin College
Angie Walls, Franklin College

Other Mathematical Session

Backgammon

3:00 p.m - 5:00 p.m., Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 264

Learn to play backgammon from expert players. It’s a fun and exciting game where players with a good mathematics background have a decisive advantage. Boards and free lessons will be provided by members of the US Backgammon Federation. Stop by anytime!.

Organizers
Art Benjamin, Harvey Mudd College

 

Tags: 
Year: 
2019

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