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Contributed Paper Sessions

1. Computational Investigation in Undergraduate Mathematics

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom J

Description

Computational tools help students explore mathematical concepts, formulate questions, and test conjectures. This session will highlight strategies for incorporating computational mathematics into the undergraduate math curriculum. We encourage talks on computational investigation of mathematical topics, the interplay of computation and proof, computation in the development of mathematical maturity, and assessment of computational learning goals.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

 

2. Real World Examples in Abstract Algebra & Number Theory

Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J

Description

Providing context to topics from an undergraduate abstract algebra or number theory course helps ground the concepts in reality, increase engagement and spur interest. In these talks presenters will share their best real world example from these courses; providing an overview of the mathematical concept and explaining how their example is related to the underlying mathematics. Talks should be accessible to undergraduate mathematics majors.

Organizers:
Scott Williams, University of Central Oklahoma
Erin Williams, University of Central Oklahoma

 

3. Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom A

Description

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Timothy D. Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

Sponsor: BIO SIGMAA

 

4. Modeling in Your Differential Equations Course – Just Do It!

Part A: Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom L
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom L

Description

In differential equations, a pivotal STEM course, effort is given to doing modeling to motivate students and facilitate transferability to cognate areas. Faculty who do modeling in differential equations courses share their efforts. This session offers experiences, plans, and aspirations with specific, rich illustrations of modeling to enhance skills in both differential equations and its applications.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE (www.simiode.org) Director
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Janet Fierson, LaSalle University
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Sponsor: SIMIODE

 

5. Math In Action

Thursday, July 30, 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom J

Description

Mathematics is in action within many beautiful non-mathematical settings, spanning from interplays with the sciences, to unexpected applications to games, art, social justice, and economics, among others. This session invites presenters to share work in which mathematics is used in another field. We encourage joint presentations by teams or advisor-student pairs. This session is in conjunction with the IPS “Women In Math: Math In Action”

Organizers:
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Emelie Kenney, Siena College
Sarah Wolff, Denison University

Sponsor: AWM

 

6. Practices to Reduce Mathematics Anxiety

Thursday, July 30, 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Description

This session features papers on practices that have helped students overcome mathematics anxiety, such as classroom or office hours interventions, course-wide approaches to teaching and learning, course revision, and program-wide reforms. Papers may also be about research on math anxiety or practices that were intended to help students overcome their mathematics anxiety but did not achieve this objective.

Organizers:
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Debra K. Borkovitz, Boston University
Raman Rohatgi, Saint Mary's College at Notre Dame
Zoe Misiewicz, State University of New York at Oswego
Azadeh Rafizadeh, William Jewell College
Timothy Goldberg, Lenoir-Rhyne University
Maria Fung, Worcester State University

 

7. Online Pedagogy of Upper Division Mathematics

Part A: Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

Description

Much of the discussion of online mathematics courses has been focused on lower division courses that serve other disciplines or the general education curriculum. In this session, we will address pedagogical strategies for delivering upper division courses in an online setting. Included in the discussion will be topics related to course design, content delivery, student interaction, and assessment.

Organizers:
George H. Lytle, University of Montevallo
Cheryll C. Johnson, Asbury University

 

8. Interplay Between Digital Mathematics Learning and Effective Pedagogical Tools

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 411 & 412

Description

In this session we intend to showcase some of the best practices in undergraduate mathematics instruction that are enhanced by digital tools and effective pedagogical practices. Talks will include links for getting started with a platform, sharing of materials for use, and both evidence and rationale that pedagogy was enhanced. Speakers are encouraged to address the integration of open educational resources, e.g., open (free) books with randomized question libraries that have nominal costs. Moreover, the presenters will explore the effectiveness of electronic assessments, such as formative versus summative, while including (but not limiting to) dynamic and/or adaptive forms. Additionally, participants will compare their platform of choice to other available platforms, along with suitable pedagogical tools (e.g., blended learning, active learning, project-based learning).

Organizers:
Benjamin Atchison, Framingham State University
Ariel Cintron-Arias, East Tennessee State University
Michael Miner, American Public University System
Sharon Mosgrove, Western Governors University
Ryan Nivens, East Tennessee State University
Douglas Scheib, Western Governors University
Philip Smith, East Tennessee State University
Carolyn Yackel, Mercer University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education

 

9. Mastery Grading

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

Description

Mastery grading includes assessment techniques such as standards-based grading, specifications grading, and mastery-based testing. In these, a student’s grade is directly tied to their mastery of specific objectives rather than collecting points or partial credit. We invite scholarly presentations that give practical implementation advice (particularly in large or coordinated courses) and provide evidence of the efficacy of mastery grading.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

 

10. Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Experiences in Mathematics

Thursday, July 31, 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon L

Description

A Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) is a practice of scientific disciplines (fewer in math) embedding research experiences into classrooms. This session seeks evidenced-based practices implementing research into classrooms at all levels with the goal to define a CURE experience in math. Presentations may include class projects, activities, whole semester projects or other forms of mathematical research within a course.

Organizers:
Peri Shereen, CSU Monterey Bay
Lipika Deka, CSU Monterey Bay
Jeffrey Wand, CSU Monterey Bay

 

11. Improving Success in College Mathematics Courses

Saturday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom I

Description

Many faculty in higher education have experienced their students struggle with mathematics skills that should have been mastered earlier. In this session, we will consider how to address the challenges that faculty face in teaching mathematics to an under-prepared audience, share strategies for strengthening skills and fostering interest in mathematics, and explore solutions for improving success in college mathematics courses. In particular, we will explore the innovations in the co-requisite model in developmental mathematics education, and share class and programmatic structures utilized to support STEM Pathways.

Organizers:
Daniel A. Daly, Southeast Missouri State University
Haohao Wang, Southeast Missouri State University
Mary M. Legner, Riverside City College
Gregory D. Foley, Ohio University
Katherine J. Mawhinney, Appalachian State University
Katrina Palmer, Appalachian State University
Melissa Reid, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College

 

12. Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon L

Description

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at http://mathfest2020.davidfailing.com/

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Russ Goodman, Central College
Abigail Bishop, Iona College
Erin Moss, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

 

13. Effectively Utilizing Undergraduate Teaching Assistants

Part A: Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J

 

Description

At both research and teaching institutions, instructors have the opportunity to make use of undergraduate teaching assistants in the mathematics classroom to enhance instruction. This session seeks to share evidence-based practices about the use and support of undergraduate TAs in the classroom.

Organizers
Carolyn Yackel, Mercer University
Emily Braley, Harvard University
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University

Sponsor: Committee for the Teaching of Undergraduate Mathematics and CoMInDS

 

14. Classroom Capsules and Student Enrichment

Thursday, July 31, 1:30 p..m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom I

Description

This session focuses on mathematics accessible to undergraduates but not part of the standard curriculum. Classroom Capsules offer a fresh take on a topic in the undergraduate curriculum and include tips for classroom use. Student Enrichment talks focus on extracurricular topics suited, say, for a colloquium talk. Ideas should be novel, be surprising, or deserve to be more widely known, e.g. elegant proofs, extensions of standard topics, novel applications, or striking historical links.

Organizers:
Dan Kalman, American University
Bud Brown, Virginia Tech
James Parson, Hood College
Jill Tysse, Hood College

 

15. Applications of Technology-Driven Representations to Deepen Student Mathematical Knowledge

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Description

Considering multiple representations of a mathematics concept represents a powerful approach for deepening student knowledge. Demands for incorporating these representations into instruction emerge as technology becomes increasingly available. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of technology-driven representations for the teaching and learning of mathematics.

Organizers:
Aaron Trocki, Elon University
Jim Beuerle, Elon University
Todd Lee, Elon University
Jan Mays, Elon University

 

16. Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Mathematics

Thursday, July 30, 8:00 a..m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

Description

National data trends indicate a need to shift representation in mathematics with respect to diversity, equity, and inclusion. In response, many departments and instructors have sought to understand the barriers that inhibit persistence and success in mathematics, particularly among underrepresented minority, first-generation, low-income, and female students. This session invites presenters to share how they engage diverse student populations.

Organizers:
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Chad Topaz, Williams College

 

17. More than Math: Resilience, Growth Mindset, and Transferable Skills

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

Description

Alongside teaching mathematics, many instructors implement learning experiences oriented toward their students’ personal development. Such an approach enables student success in our classes and beyond by fostering particularly effective attitudes, mindsets, and transferable “soft skills” that rank among those most highly desired by employers. Talks focus on how presenters engage students in fostering effective mindsets and in developing transferable skills.

Organizers:
Sean Droms, Lebanon Valley College
Sara Malec, Hood College
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Prayat Poudel, Centre College

 

18. Games in Math Circles

Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Description

We will focus on games in math circles. Such games are fun to play but they also offer opportunities for participants to think deeply about optimal strategies and do meaningful computations. Computer simulations of games or the coding of a master player that the circle can compete against are possibilities. Some games are not what they seem as they can be nearly determined by the opening setup but seeing this involves some deep funstration.

Organizer:
Edward C. Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

Sponsor: SIGMAA ON MCST

19. Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, and Gambling

Part A: Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Description

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encourage

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Rec Math

 

20. Mathematics and Sports

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom B

Description

The expanding availability of play-by-play statistics and video-based spatial data have led to innovative mathematical research with impacts on strategy and player evaluation. Other areas of interest include ranking methods, predictive models, physics-based analysis, etc. Research presentations, expository talks, and pedagogical contributions are all welcome. Projects involving undergraduate students are particularly encouraged for submission.

Organizers:
Liz Bouzarth, Furman University
Diana Cheng, Towson University
John David, Virginia Military Institute

Sponsor: Sports SIGMAA

 

21. Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education

Part A: Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

Description

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian P. Katz, Smith College
Shiv Smith Karunakaran, Michigan State University
Nicole Engelke Infante, West Virginia University

Sponsor: SIGMAA RUME

 

22. Inquiry-Based Teaching & Learning

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K
Part B: Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

Description

Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) aims to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. IBL methods help students develop deep understanding by connecting them with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on IBL teaching and learning methods. Talks on successful IBL activities, evidence-based IBL research, and talks that can help new IBL instructors are especially encouraged.

Organizers:
Carl Mummert, Marshall University
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Amy Ksir, US Naval Academy
Nathaniel Miller, U. Northern Colorado
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Sponsor: IBL SIGMAA

 

23. SIAM ED20 Contributed Papers

Description

The 2020 SIAM Conference on Applied Mathematics Education (ED20) is intended for mathematics teacher educators, especially for in-service professional development; faculty members in colleges and universities who are interested in applied and computational mathematics and have a strong interest in educational innovation, practice, improvement and faculty development; and graduate students in applied mathematical areas with ambitions for careers in academia with a strong education component.Contributed papers are welcome in any of the themes of the ED20 conference: Educating Students in Applied Mathematics, Issues of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Modeling Inside and Outside the Classroom, Engaging the Public in Applied Mathematics and Scholarship and Research in Applied Mathematics Education.

Organizers:
Ron Buckmire, Occidental College
Karen Bliss, Virginia Military Institute

 

Year: 
2020

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