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Invited Paper Sessions

Harmonic Analysis and Applications to Complex Analysis and Partial Differential Equations

Thursday, July 30, 8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Description

This invited paper session focuses on research problems at the interface between Harmonic Analysis, Complex Analysis, and Partial Differential Equations. This choice is motivated by the fact that combinations of techniques originating in these fields has proved to be extremely potent when dealing with a host of difficult and important problems in analysis. Indeed, there are many recent notable achievements in this direction whose degree of technical sophistication is truly breathtaking. The main scientific aims of this effort are to introduce young mathematicians (advanced undergraduate students, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows) to problems of interest in Harmonic Analysis, Complex Analysis and Partial Differential Equations, to strengthen their background in these areas, and to make them aware of possible new avenues of research and collaboration.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizer:
Irina Mitrea, Temple University
Jeongsu Kyeong, Temple University

Schedule

Inverse Problems: Determining the Equation from the Solution

8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
Shari Moskow, Drexel University

Geometrically Stable Oscillatory Integral Operators

8:30 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
Ellen Urheim, University of Pennsylvania

A Sharp Divergence Theorem and Applications to Complex Analysis

9:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.
Dorina Mitrea, Baylor University

Mellin Analysis Techniques for Boundary Value Problems

9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Katharine Ott, Bates College

An Interplay between Fuglede Conjecture and Gabor Analysis

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.
Azita Mayeli, City University of New York

Singular Integral Operators for Elliptic Boundary Value Problems

10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Jeongsu Keyong, Temple University

 

Implications for Practice: Applying Education Research to our Shared Disciplinary Work

Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom B

Description

In recent years, the work of mathematics education researchers and practitioners has drawn closer as our understanding of a shared commitment to equitable and effective pedagogy has developed, as the emphasis placed on evidence-based practices has spread, and as the challenges facing higher education mathematics instruction have grown larger and changed more rapidly. Many practitioners are hungry for coherent and well-considered guidance from the literature, and many researchers are hungry for their work to impact the larger issues that motivates their research. However, this collaboration remains challenging or slow in part because of the separate spaces and ways in which researchers and practitioners do this work.

The goals of this session are to accelerate and increase the impact of recent and ongoing education research on undergraduate mathematics teaching and learning and to bridge these disciplinary spaces by highlighting exemplary models of research being applied to improve practice. Practitioners can expect to learn how to leverage research to improve their practice in responsible ways, and education researchers can expect to see exemplars of research applied in action. Discussions between the presentations will support the expansion of practitioner-researcher communication.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizer:
Brian Katz, Smith College

Schedule

Quantitative Reasoning and Symbolization Activity: Do Individuals Expect Calculations and Expressions to Have Quantitative Significance?

1:30 p..m. - 1:50 p.m.
Alan O'Byran, Arizona State University

The Teaching and Learning of Logic

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Paul Christian Dawkins, Texas State University

Adapting K-12 Teaching Routines to the Advanced Mathematics Classroom

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Kathleen Melhuish, Texas State University
Kristen Lew, Texas State University
Taylor Baumgard, Texas State University
Brittney Ellis, Portland State University

Calculus Video Project: Theoretical Design Principles for Supporting Students’ Learning from Instructional Videos

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Aaron Weinberg, Ithaca College
Jason Martin, University of Central Arkansas
Matt Thomas, Ithaca College

Supporting the Adoption of Evidence-Based Pedagogies with Peer Observation

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Valerie Peterson, University of Portland
Stephanie Salomone, University of Portland
Heather Dillon, University of Portland
Carolyn James, University of Portland
Eric Anctil, University of Portland
Tara Prestholdt, University of Portland

An Analysis of Racialized and Gendered Logics in Black Women’s Interpretations of Instructional Events in Undergraduate Pre-calculus and Calculus Classrooms

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Brittany Marshall, Rutgers University
Taylor McNeill, Vanderbilt University
Luis Layva, Vanderbilt University
Dan Battey, Rutgers University

 

Open and Accessible Areas in Computational Mathematics

Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Description

Mathematics research employ modern computational tools (such as computer algebra systems and programming environments) to investigate mathematical concepts, formulate questions, perform mathematical experiments, gather numerical evidence, and test conjectures. Computational tools can help make certain areas of mathematics research accessible to students, providing points of entry where students can formulate and explore questions in number theory, algebra, topology, and more.

This session will highlight areas of mathematics where computational tools allow students to grapple with open questions. Talks will be aimed at a broad, non-expert audience. The use of computation for investigating mathematical topics, rather than computation employed for statistical analysis, is preferred. Discussion of connections between computational investigation and proof is encouraged.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

Schedule

Patterns in Generalized Permutations

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Lara Pudwell, Valparaiso University)

How Neuroscience Provides an Accessible Context for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Victor Barranca, Swarthmore College

Computing Hyperelliptic Invariants from Period Matrices

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Christelle Vincent, University of Vermont

Bringing Intuition from Euclidean Geometry to Finite Metric Spaces

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Don Sheehy, North Carolina State University

An Undergraduate Course in Computational Mathematics

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Matthew Richey, St. Olaf College

 

Surprising Discoveries by Amateur Mathematicians

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D
Part B: Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

Description

This session will focus on sometimes overlooked non-professionals who have solved interesting mathematical problems or made significant contributions to mathematical knowledge. These persons had no formal education in higher mathematics and pursued mathematical investigations in their own way. Martin Gardner inspired such amateurs throughout his career. Indeed, he himself never completed a math course past high school, yet contributed new mathematical results, many of them published in award-winning MAA papers. From the 19th century and earlier, we will learn of the mathematical contributions of Benjamin Franklin, Mary Somerville, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Kirkman, Henry Dudeney, and Alicia Boole Stott. From the 20th century to the present, in addition to Gardner, we will learn of patent officer Harry Lindgren, artist George Odom, postal worker Robert Ammann, surgeon Jan Gullberg, artist Anthony Hill and others. On Saturday, the Martin Gardner Lecture will feature three other amateur mathematicians who made surprising discoveries: M.C. Escher, Marjorie Rice, and Rinus Roelofs.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizers:
Doris Schattschneider, Professor Emerita of Mathematics, Moravian College
Colm Mulcahy, Spelman College

Schedule

Part A

Is Mathematics too Serious a Matter to Be Left to Mathematicians?

8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
Peter Renz, Retired Editor (W. H. Freeman and Co., Birkhaüser Boston, Academic Press)

Benjamin Franklin, 230 Years Later

8:30 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
Paul C. Pasles, Villanova University

‘The Philosopher in His Study, the Literary Lady in Her Boudoir’: How Mary Somerville Transcended the Amateur Status of 19th-Century Scientific Women

9:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.
Brigitte Stenhouse, The Open University

The Reverend Thomas P. Kirkman: What Did He Do Besides Inventing the Fifteen Schoolgirls Problem?

9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Ezra (Bud) Brown, Virginia Tech

Florence Nightingale’s Notes on Victorian Officials’ Misunderstanding of Basic Mathematical Calculations and Management of Data

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.
Noel-Ann Bradshaw, London Metropolitan University

Henry Dudeney: Amateur Mathematician?

10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Charles Ashbacher, Charles Ashbacher Technologies

Part B

Alicia Boole Stott in the Fourth Dimension

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Moira Chas, Stony Brook University

The Exquisite Geometric Dissections of Harry Lindgren

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Greg N. Frederickson, Purdue University

Martin Gardner - "Are You a Mathematician?"

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Dana Richards, George Mason University

LOOK! George Phillips Odom Jr. and a Search for an Understanding Order

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Dick Esterle, https://www.dickesterle.com

Robert Amman (1946 - 1994): Postman and More

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Marjorie Senechal, Smith College

Anthony Hill and The Crossing Number

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Marcus Schaefer, DePaul University

 

Eigenvalues and Graphs

Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Description

Graphs can be used to represent the relations (edges) between objects (vertices), and so play an important role both in theoretical as well as applied settings. One important tool in understanding graphs is through the use of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices associated with graphs; this is sometimes known as spectral graph theory. There are many possible matrices that can be explored and each one brings its own strengths and weaknesses into understanding graphs. This session will bring together a variety of viewpoints of how eigenvalues and graphs are connected.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizer:
Steve Butler, Iowa State University

Schedule

Spectral and Combinatorial Properties of the Associahedron Graph

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Sebi Cioaba, University of Delaware

The Exponential Distance Matrix

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Kate Lorenzen, Iowa State University

Fiedler Vectors with Unbalanced Sign Patterns

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Sooyeong Kim, University of Manitoba

Quantum Walks on Graphs

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Sabrina Lato, University of Waterloo

A Meta-Conjecture in Spectral Extremal Graph Theory

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Michael Tait, Villanova University

 

African American Women and the Mathematics of Flight

Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

Description

The 2016 book “Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race” featured stories about African American women who worked for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from the 1930s through the 1960s. Several of these women were mathematicians: Katherine Johnson worked out the orbital mechanics of John Glenn’s orbit of the Earth in 1962; and Dr. Christine Darden revolutionized aerodynamics design to produce low-boom sonic effects in the 1970’s. Indeed, Katherine Johnson earned a BS in mathematics in 1937 and Dr. Christine Darden earned a MS in Mathematics in 1967. In this session, we will feature the mathematics of pioneers in flight such as Katherine Johnson Christine Darden; and we will discuss the history of African American women who have worked in the aeronautical industry.

Organizer:
Erday Goins, Pomona College

 

Women in Mathematics: Math in Action

Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

Description

Mathematics is in action within so many exciting non-mathematical settings, spanning from classical historical and cutting edge interplays between mathematics and physics, biology, and other sciences, to beautiful applications of mathematics to games, art, social justice, economics, and climate change, to name a few. Topics with possibly unexpected applications outside of mathematics include complexity classes, Ramsey colorings, tropical numbers, topology, hyperbolic surfaces, geodesics, and more.

In this session, we showcase current research done by women (and their students) of mathematics and statistics applied to a variety of non-mathematical settings. This session is sponsored by the AWM, and is organized by the AWM Committee on MathFest.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizer:
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Emelie Kenney, Siena College
Sarah Wolff, Denison University

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

Schedule

Math, Medicine and Mysteries

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Ami Radunskaya, Pomona College

TBA

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Lynne Seymour, University of Georgia

Identifying Geohazards with Mathematics and Statistics

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Celestine Woodruff, James Madison University

Crochet Topology

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Moira Chas, Stony Brook University

 

Supporting Student Success in Introductory Statistics through Evidence-Based Practices

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Description

Each academic year, over 600,000 students enroll in college introductory statistics courses, according to the 2015 CBMS survey. Enrollments have more than doubled since 2000. Although many of the new statistics students have sufficient mathematics fluency to succeed, many others struggle with algebra, numeric operations, and logic, leading to poor course outcomes. In this session, speakers will present evidence-based results from projects about supporting students enrolled in introductory statistics courses. Projects include identifying students in need of extra assistance with mathematical fluency and/or statistical content, and then implementing one of several ways to provide that assistance, including instructor-led sessions, computer-based support, and undergraduate-led supplemental instruction. Session speakers work at a variety of institutions, small and large, public and private. Though the context for the presentations is Introductory Statistics, the innovations and pedagogical practices presented are adaptable to any introductory college level mathematics course and have broader implications for supporting student success in first-year college level mathematics and statistics.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizers:
Judith Canner, California State Monterey Bay
Adam Molnar, Oklahoma State University

Sponsors:
SIGMAA on Statistics Education (SIGMAA StatEd)
ASA-MAA Joint Committee on Undergraduate Statistics Education

Schedule

Computer-based Learning plus Tutoring in Essentials of Statistics

8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
JayneAnn Harder, Oral Roberts University

Corequisite Statistics Courses for Equitable Support of Underprepared Students

8:30 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
Alana Unfried, California State University, Monterey Bay

Implementation and Continuation Issues for Supporting Underprepared Introductory Statistics Students Using an Assessment and Peer Tutoring Intervention Program

9:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.
M. Leigh Lunsford, Longwood University
Phillip L. Poplin, Longwood University

Large Scale Peer-Assisted Tutoring, Corequisites, and Other Math Support for Introductory Statistics

9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Adam Molnar, Oklahoma State University

Discussion

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

 

Open & Accessible Problems for Undergraduate Research

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

Description

More and more mathematics faculty members around the country are conducting math research with undergraduates. As the benefits to students and faculty of engaging in undergraduate research become apparent, the number of professors with an interest in doing undergraduate research grows. Indeed, many of us would like to begin a research project with students, but we may be unsure of how to choose problems that are accessible for students. The aim of this session is to have experienced undergraduate research mentors share open and accessible problems from a variety of mathematical fields that can be used to generate ideas for new undergraduate research projects.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizer:
Allison Henrich, Seattle University
Debra Hydorn, University of Mary Washington
Laramie Paxton, Marian University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Undergraduate Research (UR SIGMAA)

Schedule

Accessible, and Interesting Research Problems in Combinatorics for Undergraduates

8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
Oscar Vega, California State University, Fresno

Patterns in Trees

8:30 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
Lara Pudwell, Valparaiso University

Getting Started in Sports Analytics Research

9:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.
Amanda Harsy, Lewis University

Data-intensive Undergraduate Research Projects

9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Kumer Das, Lamar University

Computer Driven Questions and Theorems and in Geometry

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.
Moira Chas, Stony Brook University

Knotted Undergraduate Research

10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Colin Adams, Williams College

 

Mathematics for Data Science

Saturday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Description

Analyzing complex data requires both a strong theoretical foundation and applied data science skills to ensure that data is used responsibly and ethically. However, many definitions of data science focus only on the intersection of statistics and computer science, without any focus on what mathematical skills are needed to be a successful data scientist. As the mathematics community continues to grapple with the field of data science, educators are producing recommendations on data science curriculum and how to best prepare the future data scientist workforce. Therefore, it is crucial to consider the role of mathematics in the data science curriculum, and how to broaden access to data science career paths for mathematics students.

This session features leaders in the intersection of mathematics and data science who will discuss the role of mathematics in data science, in many different forms. This session is formatted as talks from six experts in the applications of mathematics in data science. The session will appeal to any MathFest attendees interested in strengthening skills needed for data science, understanding the applications of mathematics to data science, or pathways into data science careers.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizer:
Alana Unfried, California State Monterey Bay

Schedule

The Convergence of Multiple Traditional Disciplines Catalyze the Field of Data Science

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Talitha Washington, Howard University
Erick Jones, University of Texas at Arlington

When Life is Linear: Data Science and Linear Algebra

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Tim Chartier, Davidson College

Machine Learning Analysis for Fulfillment of Per Diem Nurse Shifts

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Semere Habtemicael, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Preparing for Data Science: A Math Educator and Industry Scientist Perspective

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Elin Farnell, Amazon Web Services

Underneath the Hood: Teaching the Theory and Practice of Optimization for Data Science

3:00 p.m.- 3:20 p.m.
Emily Evans, Brigham Young University

The Necessity of a Math for Data Science Course

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Chris Malone, Winona State University
Todd Iverson, Winona State University
Brant Deppa, Winona State University
Lee Windsperger, Winona State University
Aaron Wangberg, Winona State University

 

Current Research in Math Biology

Saturday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

Description

Mathematical biology investigates biological phenomena using mathematical techniques. This encourages collaborations between mathematicians and biologists, requiring mathematicians to learn relevant biology before applying mathematical techniques to the problem. Research in this area illustrates how biology and mathematics can work together to advance both fields. In this session, we showcase current research in mathematical biology, with an undergraduate audience in mind.

With a wide variety of biological applications and mathematical techniques that can be applied to investigate biological research questions, our session will demonstrate the breadth of this research area for undergraduates and other interested researchers.

Click here to read abstracts for the talks in this session

Organizer:
Rebecca A. Everett, Haverford College
Nicholas A. Battista, The College of New Jersey

Schedule

Integrating Disease and Ecosystem Ecology using Mathematical Models

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Rebecca Everett, Haverford College

Social Organization and its Effects on Disease Spread

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Shelby Wilson, University of Maryland

Non-Exponentially Distributed Infection and Treatment Stages in a VectorBorne Disease Model

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Miranda Teboh Ewungkem, Lehigh University

Exploring the Predictive Abilities of a Mathematical Oncology Model

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Jana Gevertz, The College of New Jersey

Using Mutual Information to Select Optimal Data Collection Times for Tumor Model Calibration

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Allison Lewis, Lafayette College

A Comprehensive Approach Toward Reproductive Phenotype Discovery

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Erica Graham, Bryn Mawr College

 

Year: 
2020

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