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SIGMAA Activities

SIGMAA on Mathematics and the Arts (ARTS SIGMAA)

Minicourse

Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Description

Hands-on, practical art puzzles inspire the mathematics of projective geometry---the study of properties invariant under projective transformations. We explore activities in perspective art or photography that motivate concepts in projective geometry, including Desargues' Theorem and numerical projective invariants. Activities in problem solving and proof are suitable for a sophomore-level proofs class. No artistic experience is required.

Organizers:
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin and Marshall College
Fumiko Futamura, Southwestern University

 

SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA)

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom A

Description

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Timothy D. Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

 

SIGMAA on Environmental Mathematics (SIGMAA EM)

Business Meeting, Reception, & Guest Lecture

Thursday, July 30, 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J

Organizer:
Benjamin Galluzo, Clarkson College

 

SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Business Meeting & Reception

Thursday, July 30, 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon K

Organizer:
Susan Crook, Loras College

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K
Part B: Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

Description

Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) aims to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. IBL methods help students develop deep understanding by connecting them with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on IBL teaching and learning methods. Talks on successful IBL activities, evidence-based IBL research, and talks that can help new IBL instructors are especially encouraged.

Organizers:
Carl Mummert, Marshall University
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Amy Ksir, US Naval Academy
Nathaniel Miller, U. Northern Colorado
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

 

SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)

Business Meeting and Guest Lecture

Building Communities Around Joyful Mathematics Through Cup Stacking

Spencer Bowen, San Francisco State University

Thursday, July 30, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon D

Abstract

Start with a row of cups. Cups jump onto each other to make larger stacks. One cup jumps one space, a stack of two cups jump two spaces, and so on. Stacks must jump a number of spaces equal to the number of cups in the stack. Can you get all your cups into a single stack? This cup jumping lesson was one that the American Institute of Mathematics partnered with the Santa Clara (CA) County Office of Education to develop at their elementary schools. The goal of the project is to promote Math Communities that create a culture of year-round enjoyable mathematical engagement and play. The Math Communities model brings together several previously established programs such as Math Teachers’ Circles and Math Festivals, as well as newly created initiatives to get students, teachers, and parents engaging with mathematics in many different formal and informal settings. We have started our efforts at Title 1 elementary schools in the county with high proportions of Spanish-speaking families. At the talk you’ll have a chance to problem solve through the cup jumping lesson and will be able to take away examples of activities that promote joyful mathematical learning for students and parents along with models for coordinated implementation of similar materials in classroom learning and teachers’ professional development time. You’ll leave with a replicable "stealable" tool, program, approach, or learning that is ready for others to adapt.

Organizer:
Jane Long, Stephen F. Austin State University

Contributed Paper Session

Games in Math Circles

Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Description

We will focus on games in math circles. Such games are fun to play but they also offer opportunities for participants to think deeply about optimal strategies and do meaningful computations. Computer simulations of games or the coding of a master player that the circle can compete against are possibilities. Some games are not what they seem as they can be nearly determined by the opening setup but seeing this involves some deep funstration.

Organizer:
Edward C. Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

 

SIGMAA on Mathematics & Sports (Sports SIGMAA)

Business Meeting & Guest Lecture

Thursday, July 30, 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

Contact:
Liz Bouzarth, Furman University

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and Sports

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom B

Description

The expanding availability of play-by-play statistics and video-based spatial data have led to innovative mathematical research with impacts on strategy and player evaluation. Other areas of interest include ranking methods, predictive models, physics-based analysis, etc. Research presentations, expository talks, and pedagogical contributions are all welcome. Projects involving undergraduate students are particularly encouraged for submission.

Organizers:
Liz Bouzarth, Furman University
Diana Cheng, Towson University
John David, Virginia Military Institute

 

SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (Rec SIGMAA)

Business Meeting, Reception, and Guest Lecture

Gears, Graphs, and Archimedes

Gary Gordon, Lafayette College

Friday, July 31, 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Abstract

This talk connects a children’s plastic gear toy with two Archimedean solids, the cubeoctahedron and the icosadodechedron. Workable arrangements of gears correspond to planar bipartite graphs, and the duals of these graphs give the connection to the solids. Euler’s famous polyhedron formula plays an important role here. The talk will include lots of very small plastic pieces not intended for very small children.

Organizer:
Robert Vallin, Lamar University

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, Gambling and Sports

Part A: Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Description

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encourage

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

 

SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

Invited Paper Session

Implications for Practice: Applying Education Research to our Shared Disciplinary Work

Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom B

Contributed Paper Session

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education

Part A: Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

Description

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian P. Katz, Smith College
Shiv Smith Karunakaran, Michigan State University
Nicole Engelke Infante, West Virginia University

 

SIGMAA on Statistics Education (SIGMAA STAT-ED)

Business Meeting

Friday, July 31, 6:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J

Organizer:
Judith Canner, California State University, Monterey Bay

Invited Paper Session

Supporting Student Success in Introductory Statistics through Evidence-Based Practices

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Invited Paper Session

Mathematics for Data Science

Saturday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Minicourse

Experiences in Teaching Introductory Data Science to Math Majors

Part A: Friday, July 31, 3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3
Part B: Saturday, August 1, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Description

Participants in this mini-course will be exposed to topics covered in the introductory data science course at Winona State University. A three-prong pedagogical approach is used in teaching this course (i.e. hands-on activity -> non-programming software -> writing code). Participants of this mini-course will be asked to engage in all three components of this pedagogy using a variety of task that can easily be implemented into existing courses.

Organizer:
Christopher J. Malone, Winona State University

Panel

The Modern Mathematics Major in the Data Science Era

Friday, July 31, 3:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

Description

Every year new programs in data science and statistics are being added at the undergraduate level. So where does this leave the traditional mathematics major? Panelists will discuss how mathematics programs have adapted to the demand for data science and statistics, speaking to institutional change, personal development, and the MAA view on statistics and data science within undergraduate programs in mathematics.

Organizer:
Judith E. Canner, California State University, Monterey Bay

Panelists:
Patti Frazer Lock, St. Lawrence University
Ryan Botts, Point Loma University
Tim Chartier, Davidson College

 

SIGMAA on Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics (SIGMAA TAHSM)

Business Meeting, Reception, & Guest Lecture

A Few of My Favorite Numbers

Stephen Kokoska, Bloomsburg University

Friday, July 30, 6:00 p.m. - 7:15 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon L

Abstract

Certain numbers are just naturally mysterious and appealing. For example, \(π\), \(e\), or maybe even \(√3/2\). But there are some numbers that seem to appear often enough in our work to strike a nerve and to create a lasting impression. This presentation will include a discussion of some of my favorite numbers, why they are fascinating, and some interesting examples and facts involving these numbers.

Organizer:
Chuck Garner, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology

SIGMAA on Undergraduate Research (UR SIGMAA)

Reception & Guest Lecture

Using Restorative Practices to Build Research Communities

Pamela Harris, Williams College

Friday, July 31, 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon D

Abstract

I have collaborated with over 50 undergraduate students on mathematical research and their work has resulted in over 20 research publications and an additional eight writing contributions to the profession. In this talk, I detail the specifics that made these collaborations so fruitful (spoiler alert: it was not the math). In particular, I will share ways we implemented restorative practices in the research process (building honest and sincere relationships focused on individual responsibility and shared accountability) and how these practices greatly helped to advance the mathematical work.

Organizer:
Allison Henrich, Seattle University

Invited Paper Session

Open & Accessible Problems for Undergraduate Research

Saturday, August 1, 8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

 

Year: 
2020

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