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Contributed Paper Sessions

Please note: all sessions are listed in Mountain Daylight Time (MDT = UTC-6:00)

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Part C: Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part D: Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Description:

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, CSU Long Beach
Nicole Infante, West Virginia University
Shiv Karunakaran, Michigan State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

Schedule

Part A

Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Collaborative Practices in Virtual Group Work on Dynamic Geometry Tasks

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Younggon Bae, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Modeling As Methodology and GeoGebra As a Resource in the Study of Differential Equations

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Celina Abar, Pontifical Catholic University Sâo Paulo - Brazil
Amabile Jeovana Mesquita, Pontifical Catholic University Sâo Paulo - Brazil

Building Epidemic Awareness through Mathematical Modelling

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Annela Kelly, Regis College

Part B

Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Collaborative Creativity in Proving: Adapting a Measurement Tool for Group Use

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Amanda Lake Heath, Middle Tennessee State University

Supporting Student Learning through Active Engagement: A Case Study of the Corequisite Model

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Amelia Stone-Johnstone, California State University at Fullerton

The Road Not Taken: A Comparison of Precalculus Pathways

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Ander Erickson, University of Washington Tacoma
Zaher Kmail, University of Washington Tacoma
Bonnie Becker, University of Washington Tacoma

PRACTIS (Precalculus Review and Calculus Topics in Sync): A Linked Remediation Program for Calculus I

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Marilyn Reba, Georgia State University
Dianna McGinnis, Georgia State University

Predicting Mathematics Exam-related Self-Efficacy As a Function of Prior Achievement, Gender, Stress Mindset, and Achievement Emotions

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Kaitlin Riegel, University of Auckland
Tanya Evans, University of Auckland
Jason Stephens, University of Auckland

Supporting Student Success in Virtual Corequisite Course

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Hadas Moshonov-Cohavi, Avila University

Part C

Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

How are Limits Commonly Introduced in Calculus? An Examination of Six Calculus Textbooks

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Joseph Antonides, The Ohio State University
Jim Fowler, The Ohio State University

The Impact of Attitudes on Achievement in an Active Learning Calculus Course

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Pablo Duran Oliva, Florida International University
Adam Castillo, Florida International University
Edgar Fuller, Florida International University
Charity Watson, Florida International University
Geoff Potvin, Florida International University
Laird Kramer, Florida International University

Development of Precalculus Proficiency During an Active Learning Calculus Course

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Charity Watson, Florida International University
Pablo Duran Oliva, Florida International University
Adam Castillo, Florida International University
Edgar Fuller, Florida International University
Geoff Potvin, Florida International University
Laird Kramer, Florida International University

Revised Calculus Concept Inventory: Early Development

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Barbara Moskal, Texas Tech University
Jerry Dwyer, Texas Tech University
Levi Johnson, Texas Tech University
G. Brock Williams, Texas Tech University
Jill White, Texas Tech University

Principles of Conceptual Assessment Design in Calculus I

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Zackery Reed, Oklahoma State University
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Michael Oehrtman, Oklahoma State University
Marilyn Carlson, Arizona State University

What Is Mathematics All About? Getting Insight into Freshman Calculus Students’ Mindset

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Caroline Merighi, Marquette University

Part D

Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Examining Elementary Pre-service Teachers’ Use of Visual Models in Fraction Addition and Subtraction Problems

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Sayonita Ghosh Hajra, Sacramento State
Topaz Wiscons, Sacramento State
Kimberly Elce, Sacramento State

Exploring Introductory Linear Algebra As a Course and Prerequisite

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Anna Marie Bergman, Simon Fraser University
Dana Kirin, Portland State University

Linear Algebra Curriculum Study Group 2.0: Our Vision for a Change

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Sepideh Stewart, The University of Oklahoma

Student Understanding of Mathematical Induction in an Online Setting

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Jordan Kirby, Middle Tennessee State University
Sam Reed, Middle Tennessee State University
Sarah Bleiler-Baxter, Middle Tennessee State University

Ways of Thinking about Inverses across Contexts: A Systematic Literature Review

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Stephen Strand II, California State University Chico
Zackery Reed, Oklahoma State University
John Paul Cook, Oklahoma State University
April Richardson, Oklahoma State University

Examining Language across Contexts: Connecting Instruction and Problem-Solving

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Rachel Rupnow, Northern Illinois University

Exploring Undergraduate Students' Mathematical Reasoning via Problem Posing

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Joash Geteregechi, Ithaca College

Student Partnerships as a Mechanism to Elicit Student Engagement in Intro to Analysis Courses

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Abigail Higgins, California State University, Sacramento
Ryan Alvarado, California State University, Sacramento

 

Inquiry Based Learning and Teaching

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Description:

The goal of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. Within this context, IBL methods exhibit great variety. Activities can take place in single class meetings and span entire curricula for students of any age. Students can be guided to re-invent mathematical concepts, to explore definitions and observe patterns, to justify core results, and to take the lead in asking questions. There is a growing body of evidence that IBL methods are effective and important for teaching mathematics and for fostering positive attitudes toward the subject. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of inquiry-based methods for teaching and learning. We especially invite presentations that include successful IBL activities or assignments, that support observations about student outcomes with evidence, or that could help instructors who are new to IBL try new methods.

Organizers:
Nathaniel Miller, University of Northern Colorado
Parker Glynn-Adey, University of Toronto
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Schedule

Part A

Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Application of IBL in Teaching Advanced Math Classes

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Marina Tvalavadze, University of Toronto, Mississauga

An Active Learning Group Theory Textbook to Train Students to Think Mathematically

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Alessandra Pantano, University of California, Irvine

Facilitating Inquiry Through Student Problem Posing Routine and Assessments

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Emily Dennett, Columbus Academy
Chris Bolognese, Columbus Academy

Part B

Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Increasing Engagement and Building Community through Teams in a Remote Learning Environment

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Joshua Bowman, Pepperdine University

Exploring the Tangent Line

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Judit Kardos, The College of New Jersey

IBL in an Online Flipped Classroom Model for a Transition to Proofs Class

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Xavier Ramos Olive, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Inquiry-based Instructional Practices in Remote Settings

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Demet Yalman Ozen, Middle Tennessee State University
Amanda Lake Heath, Middle Tennessee State University
Jordan Eugene Kirby, Middle Tennessee State University
Sam Reed, Middle Tennessee State University
Sarah Bleiler-Baxter, Middle Tennessee State University

Using Inquiry Effectively in a High-Impact Virtual and Experiential Practice

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Carolyn Luna, University of Texas at San Antonio
Jonathan Brucks, University of Texas at San Antonio
Kimberly Massaro, University of Texas at San Antonio

Fractal Visualization for Undergraduates: A Project-based Approach to Generating Fractal Images in Python

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Joseph Barrera, Converse College

Visualization in a Linear Algebra course

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Matthew Haines, Augsburg University

Mastery-Based Grading across the Calculus Sequence

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Kevin Gerstle, Hillsdale College

 

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, and Gambling

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. -11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Part C: Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.

Description:

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encouraged.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (SIGMAA REC)

Schedule

Part A

Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. -11:55 a.m.

Multigraphs and Crossword Puzzle Grid Designs

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Ben Cote, Western Oregon University
Leanne Merrill, Western Oregon University

Lights Out on Graph Products over the Ring of Integers Modulo k

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Travis Peters, College of Saint Benedict & Saint John's University
Ryan Munter, Saint John's University

Bounds on Solvable Snake Cube Puzzle

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Anthony Bosman, Andrews University
Adrian Negrea, Andrews University

Part B

Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

EvenQuads: A SET-like game

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Lauren Rose, Bard College

More Adventures in the Game of SET ® -- Transformations and Simulations

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Anne Quinn, Edinboro University of PA

A Combinatorial Magic Trick using the SET Deck

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Zhengyu Li, University of Toronto Mississauga
Parker Glynn-Adey, University of Toronto Mississauga

The 21 Card Trick and Its Generalization

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Dibyajyoti Deb, Oregon Institute of Technology

(CANCELED)Playing Blackjack with an Infinite Deck

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Michael Nathanson, Saint Mary's College of California

(CANCELED) Counting in Texas 42

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Jessica Oehrlein, Fitchburg State University

Lewis Carroll's Barbershop Puzzle

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Jason Rosenhouse, James Madison University

Why the Monty Hall Paradox Does Not Directly Apply to Deal or No Deal

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Christopher Ingrassia, Kingsborough Community College of the City University of New York

Statistical Analysis of the International Mathematical Olympiad

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Arthur Berg, Pennsylvania State University

Part C

Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.

Sum Amusements with Fibonacci and Other Linear Recurrence Sequences

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Edmund Lamagna, University of Rhode Island
Robert Ravenscroft, Rhode Island College

What Is the Collatz Conjecture and Why Is It So Interesting?

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Alexander Atwood, Suffolk County Community College
Russell Coe, Suffolk County Community College

A 3 X 3 Magic Square Consisting Of Consecutive Primes

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Jay Schiffman, Retired, Rowan University

 

Mathematics and Sports

Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.

Description:

The expanding availability of play-by-play statistics, video-based spatial data, and other sports data have led to innovative sports analytics research with impacts on strategy and player evaluation. Other areas of research include ranking methods, predictive models, physics-based analysis, etc. Research presentations, expository talks, and pedagogical contributions are all welcome in this session. Projects accessible to or involving undergraduate students are particularly encouraged for submission.

Organizers:
Hope McIlwain, Mercer University
Russ Goodman, Central College

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematics and Sports (Sports SIGMAA)

Schedule

Dancing through the Weights: Dancesport Scoring and Power Values

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Diana Cheng, Towson University
Peter Coughlin, University of Maryland College Park

May the Best Team Lose

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Jim Case

Approaching Scheduling Problems through a Mix of Combinatorics and Python Programming

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Sarah Blanset, Stevenson University
Josh Lang, Stevenson University

Classifying GOATs (like Brady, Russell and Ruth) by Measuring Their Tails

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Rick Cleary, Babson College
Steve Miller, Williams College

A Probabilist’s View of the Temporal Distribution of Triple Crown Winners

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Christopher Ingrassia, Kingsborough Community College of the City University of New York

NCAA Basketball Win Probability Model

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Noah Baker, Davidson College
Hope Anderson, Davidson College
Lucy Smith, Davidson College

Modeling the Influence of In-Match Dynamics on Tennis Outcomes

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Tim Zeitvogel, Pepperdine University
Timothy Lucas, Pepperdine University

 

Computational Investigation in Undergraduate Mathematics

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part C: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.

Description:

Computational tools help students explore mathematical concepts, formulate questions, and test conjectures. This session will highlight strategies for incorporating computational mathematics into the undergraduate math curriculum. We encourage talks on computational investigation of mathematical topics, the interplay of computation and proof, computation in the development of mathematical maturity, and assessment of computational learning goals.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

Schedule

Part A

Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Computation to Build Mathematical Curiosity and Wonder

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Scott Zinzer, Aurora University

Students Utilizing Computational Tools to Enhance a New Online Course and the Resulting Inspiration for an Undergraduate Research Project

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Kristi Karber, University of Central Oklahoma

Set Theory and Logic: Leveraging Computing As a Mediating Tool for Learning

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Antonio Martinez, San Diego State University

Part B

Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Computational Explorations in Abstract Algebra

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Karen Briggs, University of North Georgia
Caylee Spivey, University of North Georgia

On a Divisor of the Central Binomial Coefficient

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Matthew Just, University of Georgia
Maxwell Schneider, University of Georgia

Matrix Representations in Introductory Group Theory

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 p.m.
Paul Becker, Penn State Behrend

Using Computer Simulation to Understand Fractals and Billiards

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Robert Niemeyer, Metropolitan State University of Denver

Computational Discovery-Based Investigations in Calculus

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University

Inclusion of Computational Methods in Undergraduate Mathematics

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Sedar Ngoma, SUNY Geneseo

Part C

Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.

Investigating Competitive Graph Coloring with Unity

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Jeb Collins, University of Mary Washington

An Image Processing Tour of Undergraduate Math

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Yevgeniy Galerpin, East Stroudsburg University of PA

Computational Modeling with Real-World Data for Prospective Mathematics Teachers

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Boyan Kostadinov, New York City College of Technology, CUNY
Ariane Masuda, New York City College of Technology, CUNY
Nadia Kennedy, New York City College of Technology, CUNY

 

Math In Action

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part C: Saturday, August 7, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Description:

Mathematics is in action within many beautiful non-mathematical settings, spanning from interplays with the sciences, to unexpected applications to games, art, social justice, and economics, among others. This session invites presenters to share work in which mathematics is used in another field. We encourage joint presentations by teams or advisor-student pairs. This session is in conjunction with the IPS “Women In Math: Math In Action”

Organizers:
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Sarah Wolff, Denison University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Emelie Kenney, Siena College

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

Schedule

Part A

Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Mathematical Measurement in Data Science

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Leslie Jones, University of Tampa

The Role of Applied Mathematics in Artificial Intelligence Solutions for Humanitarian Action

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Thomas Chen, Academy for Mathematics, Science, and Engineering

Surviving the Apocalypse and its Aftermath with Mathematics

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Grace Cook, Bloomfield College
Ted Zolue, Bloomfield College
Delvon Rowley Hayes, Bloomfield College
Olivia Mercado, Bloomfield College

Part B

Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Math-Stat Modeling in Non-STEM Disciplines: A Preliminary Report

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Reza Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University
Mike Czuchry, Texas Lutheran University
John Sieben, Texas Lutheran University

Student Research Ideas in the Liberal Arts

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Heidi Hulsizer, Benedictine College

Developing First-Year College Students' Problem Solving Abilities through Game-Based Learning

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Adam Case, Drake University

Inverse Problems in Mitosis

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Alexis Varada, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Epidemiology and the SIR model: Historical Context to Modern Applications

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Francesca Bernardi, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Manuchehr Aminian, California State Polytechnic University Pomona

Modeling Early Pandemic CoVID-19 Spread: The IHME vs Me

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Genghmun Eng

Part C

Saturday, August 7, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

How Close Was The 2020 US Presidential Election?

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Victoria Powers, Emory University

The Gateway to Richer Life

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Karthikeya Sameer Kumar Mamillapalle, Daytona State College

Desmos and GeoGebra3D Interactives in Calculus III: Visualizing the Bivariate Normal Distribution

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Zachary Beamer, Piedmont Virginia Community College
Karolina Naranjo-Velasco, University of Virginia

 

Games in Math Circles

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.

Description:

We will focus on games in math circles. Such games are fun to play but they also offer opportunities for participants to think deeply about optimal strategies and do meaningful computations. Computer simulations of games or the coding of a master player that the circle can compete against are possibilities. Some games are not what they seem as they can be nearly determined by the opening setup but seeing this involves some deep funstration.

Organizer:
Edward C. Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)

Schedule

Part A

Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

A Hodgepodge of non-Traditional Games

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Rodi Steinig, Talking Stick Math Circle

Giotto- A Joyus Word Puzzle

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Rosa Aristy, Bridges to Science

Games Galore

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Skona Brittain, Santa Barbara Math Ellipse

Part B

Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.

The Tamu Math Circle Apps Website

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Philip Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Carl Van Huyck, Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival
Joshua Goldstein, Texas A&M University

The Winner's Curse

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Theodore Alper, Stanford Online High School, Stanford Math Circle

Math Circles in Times of Physical Distancing

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Brandy Wiegers, Central Washington University
Emilie Hancock, Central Washington University
Dan Zaharopol, BEAM

INVERSE

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Ed Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

A Tale of Tic-Tac-Toe: A day of Student Curiosity and Exploration

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Nicole Fider, University of Arizona

 

MathArt, ArtMath at MathFest

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 2:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part C: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Description:

This session focuses on experiences at the intersection of mathematics and any of the visual, performing, musical, architectural, literary, fiber, sculptural, or other arts. Explore aesthetic expressions of mathematics and mathematics in practicing the arts. If scholarly or aesthetic engagement at this intersection helped get you through this pandemic year, come and share in this session.

Organizer:
Douglas Norton, Villanova University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematics and Arts (ARTS SIGMAA)

Schedule

Part A

Thursday, August 5, 2:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Collaboration in the Time of COVID

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Jessica K. Sklar, Pacific Lutheran University
Bronna Butler, B.A. Baroque Arts, LLC

Art from Langford Sequences

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
David Reimann, Albion College

Hexastix Design Principles and Problems: Homogenous Non-intersecting Cylinder Arrangements

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Anduriel Widmark, Artist

A Geometry/Art Assignment with a Non-Euclidean Kaleidoscope

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Frank Farris, Santa Clara University

Part B

Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

The Literary Incarnations of Perfectoid Diamonds

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles

Needlepoint Topology, Geometry, and Beyond

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Jeff Johannes, SUNY Geneseo

Using Embroidery to Visualize the Weather and More!

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Shemsi Alhaddad, University of South Carolina Lancaster

3D Printing Pre-Scored Origami Sheets

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Donald Plante, University of New Hampshire

Lasercut Rendered Surfaces, Traces, and Slices

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Jonathan Keiter, East Stroudsburg University

Papercrafted Mathematical Art

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Douglas Dunham, University of Minnesota Duluth
Lisa Shier, University of Maryland Global Campus

Part C

Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Melodies As Curves

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Steven Wilkinson, Northern Kentucky University
Peter Lefkovitz, Northern Kentucky University

The Strange Story of Solresol

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Larry Blaine, Plymouth State University

Stochastic Snare Drums and Transition-Matrix Tom-Toms: Composing Rock Drum Kit Solos Using Stochastic Processes

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Joshua Holden, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Mathematical Art Diversions - A Puzzle and a Gift

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Debra Hydorn, University of Mary Washington

Honors Colloquium on Mathematics and the Arts

2:20 p.m - 2:35 p.m.
Roza Aceska, Ball State University

Dance and Topology

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Karl Schaffer, De Anza College and MoveSpeakSpin

 

Rethinking Mathematics Placement

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Part C: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

Description:

There is a need to reexamine mathematics placement policies and procedures, especially within the context of the pandemic. Many colleges and universities are doing away with measures like SAT/ACT. Studies show that placement exams introduce biases. Placing students accurately is crucial, as misplacement leads to long-term negative effects. Speakers in this session will share their experiences with placement processes.

Organizers:
Alexandria Theakston Musselman, University of Washington Bothell
Emily Gismervig, University of Washington Bothell
Nicole Hoover, University of Washington Bothell

Schedule

Part A

Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

The Development of a Mathematics Directed Self-Placement Process: Lessons Learned and Challenges Presented

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Alexandria Musselman, University of Washington Bothell
Emily Gismervig, University of Washington Bothell
Nicole Hoover, University of Washington Bothell

Math Placement As an Active Verb

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Michael Nathanson, Saint Mary's College California
Jim Sauerberg, Saint Mary's College California

Promoting Agency in Mathematics Placement through an Online "Buildup" Program

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Samuel Tunstall, Trinity University
Emma Ross, Trinity University

Part B

Wednesday, August 4, 3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Math Placement - A Calculus I Readiness Program

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Mei Chen, The Citadel

Success in Calculus : Investigating the Relationships between SATScores, High School GPA, Undergraduate Precaclulus Grade and Calculus Grade

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Michelle Rabideau, University of Hartford
Andrew Starnes, Lirio, LLC

The Effect of Math Placement and Multiple Precalculus Pathways on Calculus I Outcomes

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Zaher Kmail, University of Washington Tacoma
Ander Erickson, University of Washington Tacoma
Bonnie Becker, University of Washington Tacoma

Part C

Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

Preparing for Significant Placement Revision

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Daniel Jordan, Columbia College

Methodology to Estimate and Evaluate Error Rates for Mathematics Placement Policies

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Kristin Frank, Towson University
Alexei Kolesnikov, Towson University
Xiaoyin Wang, Towson University

Lessons from a Homegrown Placement Test

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Dave Rosoff, The College of Idaho
Robin Cruz, The College of Idaho

Anti-Deficit Placement Practices

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Sherrie Serros, Mount Mary University

 

Cross Curricular Applications for Pure Mathematics Courses

Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Description:

The material in pure mathematics can be used in almost every discipline—linguistics, politics, history, chemistry, anthropology, social justice, just to name a few. The presentations in this session will focus on a variety of well-constructed, cross-curricular activities and projects that can be used in undergraduate pure mathematics courses, such as discrete mathematics, abstract algebra, number theory, among others.

Organizers:
Elizabeth Donovan, Murray State University
Lucas Hoots, Centre College
Lesley Wiglesworth, Centre College

Schedule

An Introduction To Dialectic Mathematics

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Vladimir Minev, Retired

Renewing Elementary Linear Algebra Courses with Activities in Data Science

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Donna Beers, Simmons University

The Importance and Impact of Mathematics and Cryptography in Cybersecurity

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Joan E. DeBello, St. John's University
Erald Troja, St. John's University

 

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula

Part A: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Part B: Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.

Description:

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Presentation topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Tim Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (Bio SIGMAA)

Schedule

Part A

Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Citizen Science, Big Data, and Mathematical Biology Educationological

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Tyler Hagerty, University of Delaware
John Jungck, University of Delaware

Calculus Driven by Pandemic Data

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Aaron Wootton, University of Portland
Deborah Hughes-Hallet, University of Arizona / Harvard Kennedy School

Teaching Modeling and Dynamics to Biology Freshmen: The UCLA Experience

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Alan Garfinkel, University of California Los Angeles
Erin Sanders O’Leary, University of Illinois, Chicago
Hannah Sayson, University of California Los Angeles
Casey Shapiro, University of California Los Angeles
William Conley, University of California Los Angeles
Marc Levis-Fitzgerald, University of California Los Angeles
M. Kevin Eagan, University of California Los Angeles
Blaire Van Valkenburgh, University of California Los Angeles

A Systems Biology Course for Non-Majors

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College

Initiating a Translational Bio-Mathematics Research Seminar for College Students

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Emma Turian, Northeastern Illinois University
Lidia Filus, Northeastern Illinois University

Long-Term Student Research Projects Involving Modeling with Agent-Based Models and Impulsive Differential Equations

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Timothy Comar, Benedictine University

Part B

Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.

Breathing Life (Sciences) into Mathematics Courses

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Jillian Miller, Roane State Community College
Alys Hugo, Everett Community College

Sitting at the Intersection: Developing a “Just Enough” Mathematical Biology Curricula

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
John Zobitz, Augsburg University

A Topological and Non-Euclidian Dynamical Model of Biological Membranes

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Alexander Novakovic, Boston University

 

Modeling in Your Differential Equations Course - Just Do It

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 2:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Part C: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Part D: Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.

Description:

Differential equations is a natural course for modeling. More faculty use modeling. From the literature, workshops, talks, personal exchanges, etc. colleagues hear how others use modeling and decide to Just Do It! We propose this session as a way to share experiences with specific illustrations of how modeling is used to motivate students while working with them to enhance their skills in both differential equations and its applications.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Janet Fierson, LaSalle University
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Sponsor: SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations

Schedule

Part A

Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

A Prelude to Competitive Modeling

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Satyanand Singh, New York City College of Technology, CUNY

Modeling in Differential Equations in Remote and Hybrid Courses

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Active Learning: Perspective of Student Turned Researcher and Teacher

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Elizabeth Carlson, University of Victoria

Part B

Thursday, August 5, 2:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Course Correction: Adjusting to Meet Student Needs

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Lisa Bromberg, Springfield College

Memorization: A Data-Driven Activity for Modeling and Reflecting on Learning

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Brynja Kohler, Utah State University
Will Tidwell, Utah State University

Implementing in R a Generalized Hill-Keller Model Fitted to Usain Bolt’s Olympic Data

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Boyan Kostadinov, New York City College of Technology, CUNY

Desmos and Dynamics

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
L. Felipe Martins, Cleveland State University
Ieda Rodrigues, Cleveland State University
Shawn Ryan, Cleveland State University

Puff Puff, Toss Toss, Splish Splash, and Fit Fit - Modeling Using Differential Equations and Data

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE

Predicting Network Degree Distribution with Simple Differential Equations

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Dan Teague, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Part C

Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

How Long COVID-19 Takes to Gain Herd Immunity after Vaccination in Indonesia

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Prihantini Titin, Bandung Institute of Technology

From Curve Fitting to Differential Equations

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Deborah Hughes Hallett, University of Arizona / Harvard Kennedy School

TILT- and GRASPS-Inspired Implementation of a Semester-Long Modelling Project in Differential Equations

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Erin Kiley, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

Using Spring-Mass Systems to Study Financial Markets in a Differential Equations Class

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Ivan Dungan, Francis Marion University

Using Differential Equations to Model Individual Behaviors that Limit Disease Spread

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Cole Butler, North Carolina State University

Using the Slopes app to Enhance Modeling in Differential Equations

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Timothy Lucas, Pepperdine University

Part D

Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.

HIV-AIDs Epidemics with Vaccination

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Reza Ahangar, Texas A & M University Kingsville

Three Sand Tank Groundwater Flow Experiments

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Michael Karls, Ball State University

Logistic Function and Its Application in Machine Learning

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Weiqun Zhang, Wright State University

Analysis of a Couple of Dynamical Systems Associated with Cancer Treatment

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Lubna Kadhim, Morgan State University

Melting Ice in Northern Seas due to the Global Warming: Self-similar Solution for Stefan’s Problem

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Viktoria Savatorova, Central Connecticut State University
Aleksei Talonov, University of Nevada Las Vegas

 

Using Inquiry and Collaboration in Faculty Professional Development during the Pandemic and Beyond

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Part C: Saturday, August 7, 2:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Description:

Presenters will actively engage participants in scholarly conversations about using inquiry and collaboration in virtual and in-person professional development for college mathematics educators. Presenters are encouraged to share successes, challenges, and opportunities. Facilitators may introduce a specific activity or share best practices to: create community, ensure equity, foster engagement, or build specific skills, knowledge, or beliefs about teaching.

Organizers:
Nina White, University of Michigan
Patrick Rault, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy
Laura Watkins, Glendale Community College
Christine Von Renesse, Westfield State University

Sponsor: Communities for Mathematics Inquiry in Teaching Network & the MAA Committee on Professional Development

Schedule

Part A

Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Using Virtual TACTivities to Model Active Learning

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Angie Hodge-Zickerman, Northern Arizona University
Cindy York, Northern Illinois University
Eric Stade, University of Colorado - Boulder

Professional Development for Graduate Student Instructors: Using Modeling and Collaborative Inquiry to Expand Beliefs

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Babette M. Benken, Caliifornia State University, Long Beach

Designing Asynchronous Sessions for New Instructor Professional Development

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Hanna Bennett, University of Michigan
Gavin LaRose, University of Michigan
Angela Kubena, University of Michigan
Paul Kessenich, University of Michigan
Beth Wolf, University of Michigan
Scott Schneider, University of Michigan

Part B

Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Online Working Groups as a Form of Professional Development

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Nathaniel Miller, University of Northern Colorado

The SA-COMMIT and CAST-Network Mathematics Initiative

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Priya Prasad, SA-COMMIT and University of Texas at San Antonio
Cody Patterson, SA-COMMIT and Texas State University
Oscar Garcia-Roman, San Antonio Independent School District
Melisa Walters, CAST Network

The “Faculty Fellowship and Coaching Program” of NE-COMMIT (New England Community for Mathematics Inquiry in Teaching)

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Nermin Bayazit, Fitchburg State University
Christine von Renesse, Westfield State University
Ileana Vasu, Holyoke Community College

MAA IP Guide Reading Group: What We Learned

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Benjamin Wilson, Stevenson University
Sarah Loeb, Hampden-Sydney College
Michael Stratyer, Hampden-Sydney College

Using Teaching TRIOs to Support Faculty Awareness and Responsiveness to Inclusivity in Mathematics and Science Classrooms

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Sarah Bleiler-Baxter, Middle Tennessee State University
Grant Gardner, Middle Tennessee State University
Gregory Rushton, Middle Tennessee State University
Olena James, Middle Tennessee State University
Fonya Scott, Middle Tennessee State University
Amanda Lake Heath, Middle Tennessee State University

Conversations in Chicagoland: A Way to Connect with Colleagues while Preparing for Pandemic Teaching and Beyond

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Sarah Bockting-Conrad, DePaul University
Elizabeth DeWitt, Trinity Christian College
Matthew Lee, Oakton Community College
Aliza Steurer, Dominican University
Lance Vobornik, Northern Illinois University

Part C

Saturday, August 7, 2:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

International Online Professional Development for Mathematics Faculty and Teachers

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Deependra Budhathoki, Ohio University
Gregory D. Foley, Ohio University
Marian Prince, Andrews University
Binod P. Pant, Kathmandu University

Affordances and Challenges of Multi-Day Virtual PD

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Elizabeth Thoren, Pepperdine University

Putting (Good) Old Wine in a New Bottle: Adapting Face-to-Face Workshops for Online Delivery

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Sandra Laursen, University of Colorado - Boulder
Devan Daly, University of Colorado - Boulder

 

Alternative Assessments: Lessons from the Pandemic

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Part C: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Part D: Thursday, August 5, 3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Part E: Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part F: Saturday, August 7, 2:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Description:

The pandemic has forced us to rethink assessments of student learning. The past year has led to creative solutions, such as the use of mastery grading systems and various educational technologies. In this session, speakers will share their strategies, successes, and the challenges they faced in assessment during the COVID pandemic, and how these might be used in the future.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg University
Beste Gucler, U Mass Dartmouth
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University

Schedule

Part A

Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Trusting Students: Assessment in the Pandemic

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Debra Borkovitz, Boston University

Pseudo-Ungraded Exams

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Mike Janssen, Dordt University

Ungrading: Assessment from Beyond Mastery Grading

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Anne Sinko, College of St. Benedict / St. John's University

Part B

Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

A First Attempt at Mastery Based Grading

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Jessie Hamm, Winthrop University

New Job, New Modalities, New Assessment: Lessons from my Dive into Mastery Grading

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Rachel Grotheer, Wofford College

A Pandemic First Attempt at Mastery/Specifications Grading for a Joint Precalculus and Calculus I Course

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Kristen Sellke, Saint Mary's University

Reconsidering Final Exams as Mastery Assignments

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Mona Mocanasu, Metropolitan State University Denver

Online Versus In-Person Delivery: Exploring the Effects of Mastery Grading in a Ge3ometry Course for Pre-Service Elementary Teachers

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Emily McMillon, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Shaking up the Culture: Eliminating High Stakes Tests in the Midst of a Pandemic

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Teresa Magnus, Rivier University

Do All The Things! (Using Mastery Grading in Online Calculus during a Pandemic)

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

Lessons Learned During the Pandemic – The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University

Assessing Participation in the Time of Black Squares

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Christopher Shaw, Columbia College Chicago

Part C

Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.

Implicit Assumptions in Assessment

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Brian (BK) Katz, California State University Long Beach

Assessment, Proficiency, and Compassion

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Benjamin Braun, University of Kentucky

Part D

Thursday, August 5, 3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Using Portfolios and Refection As an Alternative to Final Exams

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Sarah Wolff, Denison University

Teacher-Designed Mathematics Portfolio Assessments: Motivations, Potential Benefits, and Lessons Learned

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Geoff Krall, University of Wyoming

Turning Standards into Writing Assignments

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Joshua Bowman, Pepperdine University

Part E

Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Supporting Students’ Decision-Making Process during Problem Solving in Online Introductory Calculus

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Danny Lara, Central Washington University
Emilie Hancock, Central Washington University

Motivational Formative Assessment in a Synchronous Online Advanced CalculusCourse

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Cristina Bacuta, University of Delaware

MyOpenMath and GeoGebra - Tools for Formative and Informative Learning Assessments

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Tuyetdong Phan-Yamada, Cal State Los Angeles

Using Play Posit and Nearpod as Assessment Tools in Remote Sessions

11:00 a.m. - 11:15
Louis Freese, Rocky Mountain Region

Competing for Connection: Using Virtual Trivia As a Formative Assessment

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Christoph Fischbacher, University of California, Irvine
Alessandra Pantano, University of California, Irvine

Redesigning Assessments for Increased Interactions, Reflections and Active Learning

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Sheila Tabanli, Rutgers University

Part F

Saturday, August 7, 2:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Oral Exams for College Geometry

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Holly Attenborough, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Online Assessment in STEM Courses through Student Presentations

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Eugene Yablonski, University of the Fraser Valley

Using Daily Discussion Boards to (Virtually) Assess Concept Mastery

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Jenna Carpenter, Campbell University

Teaching, Assessment and Directing a Virtual Multi-Section Course

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Katarzyna Kowal, Ramapo College of New Jersey

Engaging Students in Learning in Large Online Classes

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Seongchun Kwon, University of Central Florida

 

Promoting Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Part C: Friday, August 6, 2:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Description:

National data trends and professional mathematics organizations call on mathematicians to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice in our classes and our departmental cultures. This session invites talks that describe approaches to enabling success of diverse students, incorporating social justice into curriculum, and fostering resilience and effective mindsets in their students.

Organizers:
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Robin Cruz, The College of Idaho
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Prayat Poudel, Centre College

Schedule

Part A

Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

DEI Problems in Mathematics and Some Possible Responses

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Prayat Poudel, Centre College

When Black Lives Matter Enters the Mathematics Class: What Would You Do?

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Nicholas Heyer, San Diego State University
Kaia Ralston, San Diego State University
Antonio Martinez, San Diego State University
Chris Rasmussen, San Diego State University

A New Mathematical Metric for Inclusive Excellence in Teaching Applied Before and During the COVID-19 Era

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Jeffrey Ludwig, University of California, Irvine

Part B

Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.

Engaging Middle School Students in Math and Science

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Robin Cruz, The College of Idaho

BAMM! Building a Virtual Mentorship Community with Math Masters’ Students

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
John Rock, Cal Poly Pomona
Kimberly Seashore, San Francisco State University
Nikita Campos, Cal Poly Pomona
Alvaro Cornejo, San Francisco State University

Creating a Diverse Workforce in Biomedical Data Science: Implementation and Impact of Best Practices

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Judith Canner, California State University, Monterey Bay

Two-tiered Summer Programs to Promote Equity and Inclusion

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Nadia Kennedy, New York City College of Technology, CUNY
Ariane Masuda, New York City College of Technology, CUNY
Armando Cosme, Science Skills Center High School, Brooklyn

The Math Alliance, Lessons from 15 years of Building a New American Community in the Mathematical and Statistical Sciences

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Terrence Blackman, Medgar Evers College
David Goldberg, Purdue University
Phil Kutzko, University of Iowa
Leslie McClure, Drexel University
William Vélez, University of Arizona

The Two Faces of Data and Algorithms

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Deborah Hughes-Hallett, University of Arizona / Harvard Kennedy School

Using Social Justice,Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion as Context for Probability

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Carrie Muir, Whatcom Community College

Part C

Friday, August 6, 2:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Math for the People: A Radical New Approach to Quantitative Literacy

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Mark Branson, Stevenson University
Whitney George, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

Experiential Learning and Social Justice Math Class

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Linda Burks, Santa Clara University

Linear Algebra Group Projects to Promote Social Justice and Equity in Math Classrooms

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Filippo Posta, Estrella Mountain Community Collge

 

Insights into Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning from the COVID-19 Pandemic

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

Description:

From the use of data to understand injustice or COVID-19, to the development of asynchronous materials, individuals teaching quantitative literacy and reasoning courses have adapted in multiple ways over the past two years. Presenters in this session will share problems and innovations from the past two years that provide new ways of thinking about teaching for quantitative literacy and reasoning.

Organizers:
Luke Tunstall, Trinity University
Mark Branson, Stevenson University
Catherine Crockett, Point Loma Nazarene University
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Quantitative Learning (SIGMAA QL)

Schedule

Part A

Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Seeing the Pandemic through a Spreadsheet

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Enrique Acosta Jaramillo, Mathematics Consortium Working Group
Deborah Hughes Hallett, University of Arizona/Harvard Kennedy School

COVID-19, Statistical Literacy and the Diabolical Denominator

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Milo Schield, Augsburg University

Putting COVID-19 Data to Good Use: Projects For Undergraduate Research

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
John Sieben, Texas Lutheran University
Reza Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University

Part B

Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

Quantitative Literacy vs QAnon

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Gary Huey, Ferris State University

Hot Off The Press: Quantitative Literacy Work Inspired By The COVID-19 Pandemic

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Nathan Grawe, Carleton College

Eventmath: An Open-access, Community-built Repository Pairing Current Events and Math Lessons

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Greg Stanton, Higher Math Help
Brendan Sullivan, Emmanuel College

Grouping & Regrouping Quantitative Literacy

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Marian Anton, Central Connecticut State University
Karen Santoro, Central Connecticut State University

 

Ethnomathematics: Culture Meets Mathematics in the Classroom

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

Description:

As more institutions strive to present multicultural offerings, courses dedicated to or incorporating Ethnomathematics - the study of mathematical aspects of the cultures of different peoples - are becoming more popular. This session features talks that present research that has been successful in attracting and involving students in Ethnomathematics. Ideas and innovations in Ethnomathematics for its use in teaching are welcome.

Organizers:
Ximena Catepillan, Millersville University of Pennsylvania
Janet Beery, University of Redlands
Cynthia Taylor, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Sponsor: SIGMAA on the History of Mathematics (HOM SIGMAA)

Schedule

Part A

Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Sigma: Consideration of the Mathematical Aspect of “The Sum of Things” in an Ancient Greek Text of Rhetoric

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Ann von Mehren, University of Memphis

Mathematical Mysteries of Rapa Nui with Classroom Activities

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Cynthia Huffman, Pittsburg State University
Ximena Catepillan, Millersville University
Scott Thuong, Pittsburg State University

Symmetric Designs of Mirror Curves Inspired by African Sona

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Darrah Chavey, Beloit College

Part B

Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

Mathematics Within, Mathematics Without

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Thomas Gilsdorf, Central Michigan University

Teaching a Project-Based Ethnomathematics Course Online

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Antonia Cardwell, Millersville University of PA
Erin Moss, Millersville University of PA

 

Creating Relevance in Introductory Mathematics Courses

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Description:

Many students graduate college having taken only one mathematics course. How can introductory mathematics courses inspire students to become mathematically literate? One approach is to replace traditional, computation-focused Quantitative Reasoning and College Algebra material that students often find unrelatable with content that better reflects students’ real-life experiences. We invite talks that describe successful class activities or projects; innovative course resources or uses of technology; or complete course or curriculum redesigns that focus on conveying the introductory mathematics content in a more authentic way.

Organizers:
Tracii Friedman, Colorado Mesa University
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University

Schedule

Part A

Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Experiencing Mathematics as Relevant: Classroom-tested Stand-Alone Activities

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Alice Petillo, Marymount University

A Quantitative Reasoning Course Redesign

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Tracii Friedman, Colorado Mesa University

The Beautility of Math: A Mathematical Reasoning Course

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Jeneva Clark, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Jonathan Clark, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Part B

Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Saving the World with Mathematical Modeling: An Introductory Course in Sustainability-Math

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Jacob Duncan, Winona State University

Suggestions for a Survey Course for Liberal Arts Students That Is Not Like "A Traditional Math Class"

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Brendan Sullivan, Emmanuel College

Enhance Students' Learning by Introducing Real Life Problems and Examples into Quantitative Reasoning Course

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Chamila Ranaweera, Southeast Technical College

Abstract Mathematics Can Be Relevant: I Used It to Paint My Bathroom!

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Erika Ward, Jacksonville University

Using the Card Game SET in a General Education Math Class

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Lydia Kennedy, Virginia Wesleyan University

Modeling Ebola Spread in Introductory Courses

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University

Math for Gen Ed: Car Loan Exercise

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Erin Williams, University of Central Oklahoma

Discussion Boards and a Math in Culture Assignment in a Mathematics General Education Course

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Holly Attenborough, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

 

Closing Wallets while Opening Minds: Adopting Open Educational Resources in Mathematics

Part A: Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

Description:

An increasing number of authoring tools, learning platforms, and related technological enhancements continue to support the creation of open educational resources (OER) in mathematics and across disciplines, as well as push the boundaries in areas such as accessibility. This session will showcase recent developments in OER and highlight ways in which these resources are currently used in math curricula.

Organizers:
Britney Hopkins, University of Central Oklahoma
Benjamin Atchison, Framingham State University
James Quinlan, University of New England
Rob Beezer, University of Puget Sound
Oscar Levin, University of Northern Colorado
Sean Laverty, University of Central Oklahoma
Emily Hendryx, University of Central Oklahoma

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technologies in Mathematics Education (CTiME)

Schedule

Part A

Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Open Mathematics: How to Reduce the Cost Burden for Entry-level Mathematics Students

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Taylor Kilman, Indian River State College

OER for College STEM courses

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Krassi Lazarova, Centenary University
Kathy Turrisi, Centenary University

Advancing Student Learning through Customized Open Education Resources

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Md Sazib Hasan, Dixie State University
Vinodh Chellamuthu, Dixie State University

Jupyter Books

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Ben Vanderlei, University of the Fraser Valley

Using a Free Geometry App and Activity-Based Text in a Course for Elementary Ed Majors

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Chris Oehrlein, Oklahoma City Community College

Use Kahoot and GeoGebra to Engage Students and Enhance Learning

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Yun Su, Indiana Tech

Part B

Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

Plotting Mathematical Structures in Minetest

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Kyle Claassen, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Rethinking Video Formats and Content Delivery in a Digital, Post-Pandemic World.

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Robert Niemeyer, Metropolitan State University of Denver

 

 

Year: 
2021