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Contributed Paper Sessions

Please note: all sessions are listed in Mountain Daylight Time (MDT = UTC-6:00)

1. Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education

Part A: Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Description:

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, CSU Long Beach
Nicole Infante, West Virginia University
Shiv Karunakaran, Michigan State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA RUME

 

2. Inquiry Based Learning and Teaching

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

The goal of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. Within this context, IBL methods exhibit great variety. Activities can take place in single class meetings and span entire curricula for students of any age. Students can be guided to re-invent mathematical concepts, to explore definitions and observe patterns, to justify core results, and to take the lead in asking questions. There is a growing body of evidence that IBL methods are effective and important for teaching mathematics and for fostering positive attitudes toward the subject. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of inquiry-based methods for teaching and learning. We especially invite presentations that include successful IBL activities or assignments, that support observations about student outcomes with evidence, or that could help instructors who are new to IBL try new methods.

Organizers:
Nathaniel Miller, University of Northern Colorado
Parker Glynn-Adey, University of Toronto
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Sponsor: SIGMAA IBL

 

3. Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, and Gambling

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. -11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encouraged.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Rec Math

 

4. Mathematics and Sports

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

The expanding availability of play-by-play statistics, video-based spatial data, and other sports data have led to innovative sports analytics research with impacts on strategy and player evaluation. Other areas of research include ranking methods, predictive models, physics-based analysis, etc. Research presentations, expository talks, and pedagogical contributions are all welcome in this session. Projects accessible to or involving undergraduate students are particularly encouraged for submission.

Organizers:
Hope McIlwain, Mercer University
Russ Goodman, Central College

Sponsor: Sports SIGMAA

 

5. Computational Investigation in Undergraduate Mathematics

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Description:

Computational tools help students explore mathematical concepts, formulate questions, and test conjectures. This session will highlight strategies for incorporating computational mathematics into the undergraduate math curriculum. We encourage talks on computational investigation of mathematical topics, the interplay of computation and proof, computation in the development of mathematical maturity, and assessment of computational learning goals.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

 

6. Math In Action

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Description:

Mathematics is in action within many beautiful non-mathematical settings, spanning from interplays with the sciences, to unexpected applications to games, art, social justice, and economics, among others. This session invites presenters to share work in which mathematics is used in another field. We encourage joint presentations by teams or advisor-student pairs. This session is in conjunction with the IPS “Women In Math: Math In Action”

Organizers:
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Sarah Wolff, Denison University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Emelie Kenney, Siena College

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

 

7. Games in Math Circles

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Description:

We will focus on games in math circles. Such games are fun to play but they also offer opportunities for participants to think deeply about optimal strategies and do meaningful computations. Computer simulations of games or the coding of a master player that the circle can compete against are possibilities. Some games are not what they seem as they can be nearly determined by the opening setup but seeing this involves some deep funstration.

Organizer:
Edward C. Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)

 

8. MathArt, ArtMath at MathFest

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Description:

This session focuses on experiences at the intersection of mathematics and any of the visual, performing, musical, architectural, literary, fiber, sculptural, or other arts. Explore aesthetic expressions of mathematics and mathematics in practicing the arts. If scholarly or aesthetic engagement at this intersection helped get you through this pandemic year, come and share in this session.

Organizer:
Douglas Norton, Villanova University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematics and Arts (ARTS SIGMAA)

 

9. Rethinking Mathematics Placement

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Description:

There is a need to reexamine mathematics placement policies and procedures, especially within the context of the pandemic. Many colleges and universities are doing away with measures like SAT/ACT. Studies show that placement exams introduce biases. Placing students accurately is crucial, as misplacement leads to long-term negative effects. Speakers in this session will share their experiences with placement processes.

Organizers:
Alexandria Theakston Musselman, University of Washington Bothell
Emily Gismervig, University of Washington Bothell
Nicole Hoover, University of Washington Bothell

 

10. Cross Curricular Applications for Pure Mathematics Courses

Part A: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Part B: Saturday, August 7, 3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

The material in pure mathematics can be used in almost every discipline—linguistics, politics, history, chemistry, anthropology, social justice, just to name a few. The presentations in this session will focus on a variety of well-constructed, cross-curricular activities and projects that can be used in undergraduate pure mathematics courses, such as discrete mathematics, abstract algebra, number theory, among others.

Organizers:
Elizabeth Donovan, Murray State University
Lucas Hoots, Centre College
Lesley Wiglesworth, Centre College

 

11. Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula

Part A: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Part B: Saturday, August 7, 3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Presentation topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Tim Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (Bio SIGMAA)

 

12. Modeling in Your Differential Equations Course - Just Do It

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Description:

Differential equations is a natural course for modeling. More faculty use modeling. From the literature, workshops, talks, personal exchanges, etc. colleagues hear how others use modeling and decide to Just Do It! We propose this session as a way to share experiences with specific illustrations of how modeling is used to motivate students while working with them to enhance their skills in both differential equations and its applications.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Janet Fierson, LaSalle University
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Sponsor: SIMIODE

 

13. Using Inquiry and Collaboration in Faculty Professional Development during the Pandemic and Beyond

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Description:

Presenters will actively engage participants in scholarly conversations about using inquiry and collaboration in virtual and in-person professional development for college mathematics educators. Presenters are encouraged to share successes, challenges, and opportunities. Facilitators may introduce a specific activity or share best practices to: create community, ensure equity, foster engagement, or build specific skills, knowledge, or beliefs about teaching.

Organizers:
Nina White, University of Michigan
Patrick Rault, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy
Laura Watkins, Glendale Community College
Christine Von Renesse, Westfield State University

Sponsor: Communities for Mathematics Inquiry in Teaching Network & the MAA Committee on Professional Development

 

14. Alternative Assessments: Lessons from the Pandemic

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

The pandemic has forced us to rethink assessments of student learning. The past year has led to creative solutions, such as the use of mastery grading systems and various educational technologies. In this session, speakers will share their strategies, successes, and the challenges they faced in assessment during the COVID pandemic, and how these might be used in the future.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg University
Beste Gulcer, U Mass Dartmouth
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University

 

15. Promoting Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

National data trends and professional mathematics organizations call on mathematicians to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice in our classes and our departmental cultures. This session invites talks that describe approaches to enabling success of diverse students, incorporating social justice into curriculum, and fostering resilience and effective mindsets in their students.

Organizers:
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Prayat Poudel, Centre College

 

16. Insights into Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning from the COVID-19 Pandemic

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

From the use of data to understand injustice or COVID-19, to the development of asynchronous materials, individuals teaching quantitative literacy and reasoning courses have adapted in multiple ways over the past two years. Presenters in this session will share problems and innovations from the past two years that provide new ways of thinking about teaching for quantitative literacy and reasoning.

Organizers:
Luke Tunstall, Trinity University
Mark Branson, Stevenson University
Catherine Crockett, Point Loma Nazarene University
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Quantitative Learning (SIGMAA QL)

 

17. Ethnomathematics: Culture Meets Mathematics in the Classroom

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

As more institutions strive to present multicultural offerings, courses dedicated to or incorporating Ethnomathematics - the study of mathematical aspects of the cultures of different peoples - are becoming more popular. This session features talks that present research that has been successful in attracting and involving students in Ethnomathematics. Ideas and innovations in Ethnomathematics for its use in teaching are welcome.

Organizers:
Ximena Catepillan, Millersville University of Pennsylvania
Janet Beery, University of Redlands
Cynthia Taylor, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Sponsor: SIGMAA on the History of Mathematics (HOM SIGMAA)

 

18. Leveraging Competitions to Integrate Math Modeling Into Your Classroom

Part A: Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.

Description:

The Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications (COMAP) sponsors international mathematical modeling contest opportunities that challenge undergraduate students to use mathematics, computation, and scientific knowledge to solve real world problems. Faculty advisors will present contributed papers that share their experiences in integrating modeling into the curriculum and in leveraging competitions to support and develop student math modelers.

Organizers:
Kathleen Snook, Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications (COMAP)
Sol Garfunkel, Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications (COMAP)
Amanda Beecher, Ramapo College of New Jersey

 

19. Creating Relevance in Introductory Mathematics Courses

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

Many students graduate college having taken only one mathematics course. How can introductory mathematics courses inspire students to become mathematically literate? One approach is to replace traditional, computation-focused Quantitative Reasoning and College Algebra material that students often find unrelatable with content that better reflects students’ real-life experiences. We invite talks that describe successful class activities or projects; innovative course resources or uses of technology; or complete course or curriculum redesigns that focus on conveying the introductory mathematics content in a more authentic way.

Organizers:
Tracii Friedman, Colorado Mesa University
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University

 

20. Closing Wallets while Opening Minds: Adopting Open Educational Resources in Mathematics

Part A: Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.

Description:

An increasing number of authoring tools, learning platforms, and related technological enhancements continue to support the creation of open educational resources (OER) in mathematics and across disciplines, as well as push the boundaries in areas such as accessibility. This session will showcase recent developments in OER and highlight ways in which these resources are currently used in math curricula.

Organizers:
Britney Hopkins, University of Central Oklahoma
Benjamin Atchison, Framingham State University
James Quinlan, University of New England
Rob Beezer, University of Puget Sound
Oscar Levin, University of Northern Colorado
Sean Laverty, University of Central Oklahoma
Emily Hendryx, University of Central Oklahoma

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technologies in Mathematics Education (CTME)

 

Year: 
2021