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SIGMAA Activities

Please note: all sessions are listed in Mountain Daylight Time (MDT = UTC-6:00)

SIGMAA on Mathematics and Arts (ARTS SIGMAA)

Contributed Paper Session

MathArt, ArtMath at MathFest

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Description:

This session focuses on experiences at the intersection of mathematics and any of the visual, performing, musical, architectural, literary, fiber, sculptural, or other arts. Explore aesthetic expressions of mathematics and mathematics in practicing the arts. If scholarly or aesthetic engagement at this intersection helped get you through this pandemic year, come and share in this session.

Organizer:
Douglas Norton, Villanova University

 

SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA)

Business Meeting

Wednesday, August 4, 3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Organizer:
Hannah Highlander, University of Portland

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula

Part A: Friday, August 6, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Part B: Saturday, August 7, 3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Presentation topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Tim Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

 

SIGMAA on the History of Mathematics (HOM SIGMAA)

Contributed Paper Session

Ethnomathematics: Culture Meets Mathematics in the Classroom

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

As more institutions strive to present multicultural offerings, courses dedicated to or incorporating Ethnomathematics - the study of mathematical aspects of the cultures of different peoples - are becoming more popular. This session features talks that present research that has been successful in attracting and involving students in Ethnomathematics. Ideas and innovations in Ethnomathematics for its use in teaching are welcome.

Organizers:
Ximena Catepillan, Millersville University of Pennsylvania
Janet Beery, University of Redlands
Cynthia Taylor, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

 

SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry Based Learning and Teaching

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

The goal of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. Within this context, IBL methods exhibit great variety. Activities can take place in single class meetings and span entire curricula for students of any age. Students can be guided to re-invent mathematical concepts, to explore definitions and observe patterns, to justify core results, and to take the lead in asking questions. There is a growing body of evidence that IBL methods are effective and important for teaching mathematics and for fostering positive attitudes toward the subject. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of inquiry-based methods for teaching and learning. We especially invite presentations that include successful IBL activities or assignments, that support observations about student outcomes with evidence, or that could help instructors who are new to IBL try new methods.

Organizers:
Nathaniel Miller, University of Northern Colorado
Parker Glynn-Adey, University of Toronto
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

 

SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)

Contributed Paper Session

Games in Math Circles

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Friday, August 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Description:

We will focus on games in math circles. Such games are fun to play but they also offer opportunities for participants to think deeply about optimal strategies and do meaningful computations. Computer simulations of games or the coding of a master player that the circle can compete against are possibilities. Some games are not what they seem as they can be nearly determined by the opening setup but seeing this involves some deep funstration.

Organizer:
Edward C. Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

 

SIGMAA on Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching (SIGMAA MKT)

Panel Session

Three Mathematicians and One Math Education Researcher Share Lessons for Teaching Future Teachers

Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

Description:

Teaching future K-12 teachers is challenging because teaching-to-teach requires a skill set beyond teaching mathematics. Often, young faculty members find themselves solely responsible for instructing future teacher content courses and have few available resources for guidance. In this panel, we explore effective methods for teaching preservice K-12 mathematics teachers. Join us as our panelists share key experiences and lessons learned.

Organizers:
Carl Olimb, Augustana University
Yvonne Lai, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Jennifer Whitfield, Texas A&M University

Panelists:
Amanda Ruiz, University of San Diego
Joe Champion, Boise State
Scott Kaschner, Butler University
Theresa Jorgensen, University of Texas at Arlington

 

SIGMAA for the Philosophy of Mathematics (POM SIGMAA)

Guest Lecture

As-if Mathematics Were True

Thursday, August 5, 3:10 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Elaine Landry, University of California - Davis

Description

Central claim: When we shift our focus from solving philosophical problems to solving mathematical ones, we see that an as-if methodological interpretation of mathematical structuralism can be used to provide an account of both the practice and the applicability of mathematics whilst avoiding the conflation of mathematical and metaphysical considerations. Time for discussion with the audience will be included. This talk should be accessible to mathematicians at all levels with some interest in the philosophy of mathematics.

Organizer:
Bonnie Gold, Monmouth University

 

SIGMAA on Quantitative Learning (SIGMAA QL)

Business Meeting

Wednesday, August 4, 2:30 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.

Organizer:
Samual Tunstall, Trinity University

Contributed Paper Session

Insights into Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning from the COVID-19 Pandemic

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

From the use of data to understand injustice or COVID-19, to the development of asynchronous materials, individuals teaching quantitative literacy and reasoning courses have adapted in multiple ways over the past two years. Presenters in this session will share problems and innovations from the past two years that provide new ways of thinking about teaching for quantitative literacy and reasoning.

Organizers:
Luke Tunstall, Trinity University
Mark Branson, Stevenson University
Catherine Crockett, Point Loma Nazarene University
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

 

SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (SIGMAA REC)

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, and Gambling

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. -11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encouraged.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

 

SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

Business Meeting

Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Organizer:
Nicole Infante, West Virginia University

Contributed Paper Session

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education

Part A: Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Description:

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, CSU Long Beach
Nicole Infante, West Virginia University
Shiv Karunakaran, Michigan State University

 

SIGMAA on Sports (Sports SIGMAA)

Business Meeting and Guest Lecture

Friday, August 6, 1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Description

The annual business meeting of the Sports SIGMAA. We will discuss SIGMAA activities, potential new ventures, budget issues, and also have a guest lecturer to talk about their experiences, activities, or perspectives on sports analytics. All are welcome!

Organizer:
Russ Goodman, Central College

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and Sports

Part A: Thursday, August 5, 11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Description:

The expanding availability of play-by-play statistics, video-based spatial data, and other sports data have led to innovative sports analytics research with impacts on strategy and player evaluation. Other areas of research include ranking methods, predictive models, physics-based analysis, etc. Research presentations, expository talks, and pedagogical contributions are all welcome in this session. Projects accessible to or involving undergraduate students are particularly encouraged for submission.

Organizers:
Hope McIlwain, Mercer University
Russ Goodman, Central College

 

SIGMAA on Statistics Education (SIGMAA Stat-Ed)

Business Meeting

Thursday, August 5, 2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Organizer:
Phil Yates, DePaul University

Invited Paper Session

Supporting Student Success in Introductory Statistics through Evidence-Based Practices

Saturday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Description

Each academic year, over 600,000 students enroll in college introductory statistics courses, according to the 2015 CBMS survey. Enrollments have more than doubled since 2000. Although many of the new statistics students have sufficient mathematics fluency to succeed, many others struggle with algebra, numeric operations, and logic, leading to poor course outcomes. In this session, speakers will present evidence-based results from projects about supporting students enrolled in introductory statistics courses. Projects include identifying students in need of extra assistance with mathematical fluency and/or statistical content, and then implementing one of several ways to provide that assistance, including instructor-led sessions, computer-based support, and undergraduate-led supplemental instruction. Session speakers work at a variety of institutions, small and large, public and private. Though the context for the presentations is Introductory Statistics, the innovations and pedagogical practices presented are adaptable to any introductory college level mathematics course and have broader implications for supporting student success in first-year college level mathematics and statistics.

Organizers:
Judith Canner, California State Monterey Bay

 

SIGMAA on Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics (SIGMAA TAHSM)

Business Meeting

Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

Organizers:
Chuck Garner, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology
Bill Shillito, Oglethorpe University

 

SIGMAA on Undergraduate Research (UR SIGMAA)

Business Meeting and Guest Lecture

Using Restorative Practices to Build Research Communities

Saturday, August 7, 10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

Pamela Harris, Williams College

Description

An invited talk by Professor Pamela Harris of Williams College, titled "Using restorative practices to build research communities," will be followed by the UR SIGMAA Business Meeting.

Organizers:
Anant Godbole, East Tennessee State University
Allison Henrich, Seattle University

Invited Paper Session

Open & Accessible Problems for Undergraduate Research

Part A: Wednesday, August 4, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Part B: Thursday, August 5, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Description

More and more mathematics faculty members around the country are conducting math research with undergraduates. As the benefits to students and faculty of engaging in undergraduate research become apparent, the number of professors with an interest in doing undergraduate research grows. Indeed, many of us would like to begin a research project with students, but we may be unsure of how to choose problems that are accessible for students. The aim of this session is to have experienced undergraduate research mentors share open and accessible problems from a variety of mathematical fields that can be used to generate ideas for new undergraduate research projects.

Organizer:
Allison Henrich, Seattle University
Debra Hydorn, University of Mary Washington
Laramie Paxton, Marian University

 

Year: 
2021