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Mathematical Treasure: Doppelmayr's History of Mathematics in Nuremberg (1730)

Author(s): 
Frank J. Swetz (The Pennsylvania State University)

As a young man, Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr (1677-1750) studied mathematics and physics in Germany, Holland, and England, before returning to his birthplace, Nuremberg, in 1704 and spending the rest of his life there as a professor of mathematics. He became a recognized and prolific astronomer and mathematician and was admitted to several academies of science, including the Berlin Academy, the Royal Society, and the St. Petersburg Academy.

Title page of Doppelmayr's Historische Nachricht von den Nurnbergischen Mathematicis und Künstlern (1730)

Doppelmayr’s most enduring work may be a history of scientists and artisans in his city of Nuremberg, Historische Nachricht von den Nurnbergischen Mathematicis und Künstlern (1730), of which the title page is shown above. The book contains information on 360 mathematicians and instrument makers who were associated with his city during the 300 years prior to his writing.

Regiomontanus honored in Doppelmayr

 

Although he travelled widely, Johannes Regiomontanus (1436-1476) is claimed as a Nuremberg citizen and honored in Doppelmayr’s book as the first mathematician to be discussed. Interestingly, Albrecht Dürer, another famous Nuremberger, purchased Regiomontanus’s house after his death.

Reference: O'Connor, J. J., and E. F. Robertson, "Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr," MacTutor History of Mathematics Archive, August 2006.

These images were obtained through the courtesy of ETH-Bibliothek Zürich. The book may be viewed in its entirety at e-rara: http://dx.doi.org/10.3931/e-rara-8926

Index to Mathematical Treasures

Frank J. Swetz (The Pennsylvania State University), "Mathematical Treasure: Doppelmayr's History of Mathematics in Nuremberg (1730)," Convergence (March 2018)

Dummy View - NOT TO BE DELETED