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Themed Contributed Paper Sessions

Undergraduate Research Activities in Mathematical and Computational Biology, Part I

Thursday, August 7, 8:30 a.m. – 10:25 a.m., Hilton Portland, Plaza Level, Broadway I & II

This session is dedicated to aspects of undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology.  First and foremost, this session would like to highlight research results of projects that either were conducted by undergraduates or were collaborations between undergraduates and their faculty mentors.  Of particular interest are those collaborations that involve students and faculty from both mathematics and biology.  Secondly, as many institutions have started undergraduate research programs in this area, frequently with the help of initial external funding, the session is interested in the process and logistics of starting a program and maintaining a program even after the initial funding expires.  Important issues include faculty development and interdisciplinary collaboration, student preparation and selection, the structure of research programs, the acquisition of resources to support the program, and the subsequent achievements of students who participate in undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology.

Timothy ComarBenedictine University
Sponsored by SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA)

A New Technological Paradigm for an Undergraduate Research Experience in Agent Based Modeling

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Anne Elizabeth Yust, Birmingham-Southern College

Impulsive Models with Stochastic Behavior in Pest Management and Epidemiology

8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Timothy D Comar, Benedictine University

Getting into the Game: First Steps Into Math-Bio Research

9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
David R Dorman, Middlebury College

A Course in Mathematical Biology Using Algebra and Discrete Mathematics

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Dan Hrozencik, Chicago State University

Mentoring an Undergraduate Research Project: Simulating the Effects of Plaque Aggregation on the Neuronal Network

9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Irina Seceleanu, Bridgewater State University

Sensitivity Analysis of Stochastic Models of Integrin Signaling in Cellular Motility

10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Hannah Biegel, University of Portland
Alex Quackenbush, University of Portland
Hannah Callender, University of Portland

Mathematics in Honors Programs

Thursday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. – 3:55 p.m., Hilton Portland, Plaza Level, Broadway I & II

Honors Colleges and Programs look for unique opportunities to reach out to bright and capable students who may not be mathematics majors. This session will focus on courses, strategies, or activities, that have been used for non major mathematics classes designed for honors students.  Speakers should provide evidence of the success of and/or challenges involved with the courses they have taught.

Jacci WhiteSaint Leo University

Applying Calculus Techniques to Analyze the Motion of Single and Double Ferris Wheels

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Paul E. Seeburger, Monroe Community College

Creating a Freshman Honors Mathematics Course (for Non-Majors)

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Brian Camp, Saint Leo University

Dimension and Direction: A Journey Through Mathematical Space

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
David Clark, Randolph-Macon College

Honors Calculus at South Dakota State University

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Dan C Kemp, South Dakota State University

Searching for Great Issues in Mathematics

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Mark BollmanAlbion College

Maple in Honors Calculus

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Philip B. Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Douglas B Meade, University of South Carolina

Honors Elementary Statistics

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Jacqueline Jensen-VallinLamar University

Why Statistics??? An Opportunity for Exploration and Reflection

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Sarah L Mabrouk, Framingham State University

“To Be Honorable is to Serve” How to Align with this Motto in a General Education Honors Mathematics Course

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Lisa Marano, West Chester University

Undergraduate Research in Mathematics: How, When, Why, Part I

Thursday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. – 3:55 p.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Galleria II

Opportunities for undergraduate research have increased dramatically in recent years. There are many benefits of doing and guiding undergraduate research. We invite talks on a range of topics including, but not limited to: involving students in mathematics research, reports on successful programs, how to set up programs, and research results. We are especially interested in presentations from mentors and program directors about how programs are run and evidence of their effectiveness. We also welcome presentations from students focused on their experience and learning outcomes (talks about their research results should be submitted to other sessions). This session seeks to expand the network of undergraduate researchers and facilitators, exchange new ideas, and help make undergraduate research more accessible.

Emek KoseSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Casey DouglasSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Angela GallegosLoyola Marymount University

Building Capacity for a Research Rich Curriculum in Mathematics at Georgia College

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Ryan Brown, Georgia College
Marcela Chiorescu, Georgia College
Darin Mohr, Georgia College

Creative UG Research Collaborations: Clash of the Critters; Statistical Analysis of SIDS and More

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Jane Friedman, University of San Diego
Lynn Carole McGrath, University of San Diego
Perla Myers, University of San Diego
Riley Evans, University of San Diego

CURM: What It Is and What Are Its Results

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University

HRUMC: The First Twenty Years

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Emelie Kenney, Siena College

Maple Scholars Program

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
David Housman, Goshen College

The CSUMS/MCTP Program at Arizona State University

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Eric Kostelich, Arizona State University

The Summer 2014 SURPASs Program and My Role as Faculty Mentor

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Donna Beers, Simmons College

Talk Math 2 Me: A Seminar for Students by Students

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Joni Jane Schneider, Texas State University

Research Experiences for Undergraduate Faculty: Supporting Undergraduate Faculty in Mentoring Undergraduate Research

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Brianna Donaldson, American Institute of Mathematics
Leslie Hogben, American Institute of Mathematics and Iowa State University
Ulrica Wilson, Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics and Morehouse College
Roselyn Williams, Florida A&M University

Embodied Activities in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

Thursday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. – 4:55 p.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Parlor AB

In layman’s terms we might describe embodied activities as events that connect cognition with action. In other words, these are tasks, where a student is physically and mentally engaged in a cognitive task designed to result in learning. These tasks are created so that students are the mathematics. Many hypothesize that manipulatives “work” because they provide an atmosphere where students are engaged in actions that assist in constructing mathematical concepts. Similarly, incorporating embodied activities into the classroom has proved fruitful not only with prospective teachers but with undergraduate mathematics majors who are learning related rates, geometric concepts, and proof constructions.  Furthermore, they can serve as an entry point to inquiry-based learning because embodied activities go beyond communicating, writing, reading, and reflecting.

The purpose of this session is to share activities that require students to be physically engaged in learning all levels of mathematics, particularly undergraduate mathematics. Submitted abstracts should include the goals of the activity, description of the activity with details connecting the mathematics with the actions, and strengths and weaknesses of the activity. We encourage presentations that are audience-interactive, so that they may experience the activity in action. Talks that focus on general active learning strategies with little or no connections between cognition and physical action should submit talk proposals to the Active Learning in Mathematics contributed session.

Hortensia Soto-Johnson, University of Northern Colorado
Sponsored by MAA Committee on Professional Development

Pre-service Elementary Teachers' Perceptions of Geometric Translations in Embodied Activities

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Brent Hancock, University of Northern Colorado
Marki Dittman, University of Northern Colorado

Pre-service Elementary Teachers' Conception of Perpendicular Bisector in an Embodied Reflection Task

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Marki Dittman, University of Northern Colorado
Brent Hancock, University of Northern Colorado

Hands-on Activities to Enrich Basic Geometry Proofs: Angles in a Triangle and Parallelogram

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Sandra Fital-Akelbek, Weber State University

Measuring Around The Unit Circle

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Susan Jeannine Durst, University of Arizona

The Use of 3D Multi-Sectional, Interlocking Geometric Models and Magnetic Nets as Teaching Aids for Spatial Ability Training and Middle School Geometry Education

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Oai Ha, Utah State University

What is the NORISHIRO? Plane Development of a Polyhedron with the Tabs

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Tanaka Noriko

Visualizing Multivariate Functions in a Desktop-Sized 3-D Coordinate System

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Charlotte Ann Knotts-Zides, Wofford College

Hands-On Exploration of Topological Invariants

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Nicole Fider, UCI
Casey Kelleher, UCI
Alessandra Pantano, University of California, Irvine
Ryan Sullivant, UCI

Problem Solving through Computer Simulations

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
David Ely, The Ohio State University
Jeanette Palmiter, Portland State University

Modeling Biology in the Classroom: Birds, Bacteria, and Disease

4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Joshua Lioi, University of Arizona

"Field" & Stream: Experiencing a Vector Field

4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Steve B Zides, Wofford College

Report on the Bodies of Data Workshops

4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m.
Luke Wolcott, Lawrence University

Recreational Mathematics: New Problems and New Solutions, Part I

Thursday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. – 4:55 p.m., Hilton Portland, Plaza Level, Pavilion West

As with all mathematics, recreational mathematics continues to expand through the solution of new problems and the development of novel solutions to old problems. For the purposes of this session, the definition of recreational mathematics will be a broad one. The primary guideline used to determine the suitability of a paper will be the understandability of the mathematics. Papers submitted to this session should be accessible to undergraduate students.  Novel applications as well as new approaches to old problems are welcome.  Examples of use of the material in the undergraduate classroom are encouraged.

Paul CoeDominican University
Sara QuinnDominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Dominican University

The Mathematics, Magic and Mystery of Martin Gardner

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Colm Mulcahy, Spelman College

Generalization of the Nine Card Problem

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Brittany Shelton, Albright College
Breeanne Baker Swart, The Citadel

The Uniqueness of Rock-Paper-Scissors-Lizard-Spock

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Brian J Birgen, Wartburg College

Candy Crush Combinatorics

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Dana Rowland, Merrimack College

Exploring Sliding Tile Puzzles on your Smartphone

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University

Solitaire Mancala Games and the Chinese Remainder Theorem

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Brant Jones, James Madison University
Laura Taalman, James Madison University
Anthony Tongen, James Madison University

A New Twist on Wythoff's Game

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Alex Meadows, St. Mary's College of Maryland
Bradley Putman, St. Mary's College of Maryland

Graphs and Puzzles

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Paul Cull, Oregon State University

When You Cross Latin and Gilbreath

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University

Mathematics, Magic Squares, and Mirth (Humor)

4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Doy Ott Hollman, Lipscomb University

A Magic Square Equation

4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Donna Flint, South Dakota State University

An Efficient Backtracking Method for Solving a System of Linear Equations over a Finite Set with Application for Construction of Magic Squares

4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m.
Max AlekseyevGeorge Washington University

Flipping Pedagogy in College Mathematics Courses, Part I

Thursday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. – 5:35 p.m., Hilton Portland, Plaza Level, Broadway III & IV

While the expression “flipping a course” is relatively new, this pedagogical strategy has been around for a number of years. Some tenets that underlie this type of pedagogy are that: (1) out-of-class time should be highly structured to best prepare students for in-class activities; (2) it is useful to evaluate students’ pre-class preparation and for instructors to have access to this information; (3) class time is better spent having students engage in cooperative problem solving and discussions rather than listening and taking notes; and, (4) students benefit from more frequent structured practice and feedback in the classroom from a knowledgeable teacher. In this session participants will present and discuss examples of flipped mathematics courses and share the benefits and challenges of this type of pedagogy. Descriptions of unique models of flipped classes are welcome as are results of research on flipping pedagogy.

Jean McGivney-BurelleUniversity of Hartford
Larissa SchroederUniversity of Hartford
John WilliamsUniversity of Hartford
Fei XueUniversity of Hartford
Mako HarutaUniversity of Hartford
Ben PollinaUniversity of Hartford

Flipped/Inquiry-Based Learning Approach in a ‘Large’ College Algebra Classroom: An Interim Report

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Perry Y.C. Lee, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania
Padraig McLoughlin, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania

Flipping College Algebra: A Blended Approach

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Alison Reddy, University of Illinois

Procedural and Conceptual Thinking in a Flipped College Algebra Classroom

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Emilie Naccarato, University of Northern Colorado
Michael Spannuth, University of Northern Colorado
Bill Blubaugh, University of Northern Colorado
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado

Re "modeling" College Algebra:  A Flipped, Inquiry-Based Approach

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Kathy Pinzon, Georgia Gwinnett College
Daniel Pinzon, Georgia Gwinnett College
Matt Stackpole, Georgia Gwinnett College

TEAL (Technology Enhanced Active Learning) College Algebra at Montana State University

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Heidi Staebler-Wiseman, Montana State University
Jocelyn Short, Montana State University
Kelsey Koch, Montana State University

Integrating Sustainability into Algebra Courses: A Flipped Classroom Model

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Rikki Wagstrom, Metropolitan State University

Flipping Freshman Mathematics

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Karen O'Hara, High Point University
Adam Graham-Squire, High Point University
Laurie Zack, High Point University
Jenny Fuselier, High Point University
Ron Lamb, High Point University

How Does Flipping Affect Students' Perceptions about Learning Calculus?

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Larissa Bucchi Schroeder, University of Hartford
Jean Marie McGivney-Burelle, University of Hartford
Fei Xue, University of Hartford

Flip the Calculus Classroom: What Works, For Whom and in What Context?

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Veselin Jungic, Simon Fraser University
Cindy Xin, Simon Fraser University
Jamie Mulholland, Simon Fraser University
Harpreet Kaur, Simon Fraser University
Sonja Surjanovic, Simon Fraser University

A Study of Flipping vs Not Flipping in Applied Calculus

4:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Lori Beth Ziegelmeier, Macalester College
Chad Topaz, Macalester College

Challenges and Pitfalls of Assessing the Effectiveness of Flipped Mathematics Courses

4:20 p.m. - 4:35 p.m.
Jean Marie McGivney-Burelle, University of Hartford
Larissa Bucchi Schroeder, University of Hartford

Meta-analysis of Flipped “Pedagogy” in Undergraduate Mathematics Courses

4:40 p.m. - 4:55 p.m.
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado
Emilie Naccarato, University of Northern Colorado

Flipping Calculus II: Did it Improve this Infamous Course?

5:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University

Flipping the Integral Calculus Classroom with Multiple Instructors

5:20 p.m. - 5:35 p.m.
Jim Rolf, Yale University
Yu-Wen Hsu, Yale University
Susie Kimport, Yale University
Jennifer Frederick, Yale University

Undergraduate Research Activities in Mathematical and Computational Biology, Part II

Friday, August 8, 8:30 a.m. – 10:25 a.m., Hilton Portland, Plaza Level, Broadway I & II

This session is dedicated to aspects of undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology.  First and foremost, this session would like to highlight research results of projects that either were conducted by undergraduates or were collaborations between undergraduates and their faculty mentors.  Of particular interest are those collaborations that involve students and faculty from both mathematics and biology.  Secondly, as many institutions have started undergraduate research programs in this area, frequently with the help of initial external funding, the session is interested in the process and logistics of starting a program and maintaining a program even after the initial funding expires.  Important issues include faculty development and interdisciplinary collaboration, student preparation and selection, the structure of research programs, the acquisition of resources to support the program, and the subsequent achievements of students who participate in undergraduate research in mathematical and computational biology.

Timothy ComarBenedictine University
Sponsored by SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA)

Mathematical Biology as a Capstone Option for Science Majors

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Sheldon Lee, Viterbo University

An Optimization Method for the Spent Fuel Pool Storage at Nuclear Power Plants

8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Nathan Robert LaFerney, Texas A&M University

Social Aggregation in Pea Aphids: Experimental Measurement and Stochastic Modeling

9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Chad Topaz, Macalester College
Andrew Bernoff, Harvey Mudd College

Spatial Simulations of Chaparral Vegetation Response to Frequent Wildfires

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Timothy A Lucas, Pepperdine University

Understanding the Scales of Locomotion for Caenorhabditis Elegans in a Viscous Fluid

9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Katie Marie Sipes, James Madison University

Simulating Action Potentials Along Non-Uniform Axon

10:10 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.
Michael E Martin, www.biomathdynamics.com

Active Learning in Mathematics, Part I

Friday, August 8, 8:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Galleria II

Active learning is the process where students engage in activities such as reading, writing, or problem solving that encourage analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content. It has been well-known that active learning strategies increase student learning and have long- lasting effects on student success (Braxton, et al, 2008). For this session, we invite instructors of mathematics to discuss ways to promote this hands-on learning in the classroom. In particular, techniques that involve short reading, writing, or problem-solving prompts and exercises that are designed to reinforce classroom material are encouraged. Both examples of individual student active learning strategies and successful uses of group- related strategies (such as “think, pair, share” ideas) are welcome. The session is designed for instructors to share their experiences and provide useful tips and tricks on implementing these strategies and overcoming obstacles to active learning in general. Examples and ideas can come from any type of course, from undergraduate non-major service courses and early- major mathematics courses to late-major and even graduate-level classes. Speakers are encouraged to include assessment data on the effectiveness of their active learning strategies or empirical feedback from students and/or faculty about their strategies. Talks that focus on embodied activities that connect cognition with physical action in the classroom should submit talk proposals to the Embodied Activities in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics session.

David TaylorRoanoke College
Robert AllenUniversity of Wisconsin, La Crosse
Lorena BociuNorth Carolina State University

Active Learning in Redesigned College Algebra: Lessons Learned from Implementation

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Krista Foltz, Oregon State University
Mary Beisiegel, Oregon State University
Scott L. Peterson, Oregon State University

Active Learning for Pre-service and In-service Teachers

8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Bernadette Mullins, Birmingham-Southern College

Turning Homework Problems into Inquiry Based Classroom Activities

9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Suzanne Ingrid Doree, Augsburg College

Active Learning in Mathematics: The Math Telephone Game

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Peter Banwarth, Oregon State University

Active Algebra

9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Mary D Shepherd, Northwest Missouri State University

Making Abstract Algebra Less Abstract

10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Emma Norbrothen, Plymouth State University

Strategies to Progressively Increase Students’ Intellectual Engagement in the Learning of Abstract Algebra

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Alessandra Pantano, University of California, Irvine

Actively Learning Real Analysis

10:50 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.
Donna Flint, South Dakota State University

Pull Out Your Phone: A Quick Search for Relevant Statistics

11:10 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.
Ben Galluzzo, Shippensburg University

Exploring Velocity and Acceleration Vectors Visually

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Paul E. Seeburger, Monroe Community College

Flipping Pedagogy in College Mathematics Courses, Part II

Friday, August 8, 8:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Parlor AB

While the expression “flipping a course” is relatively new, this pedagogical strategy has been around for a number of years. Some tenets that underlie this type of pedagogy are that: (1) out-of-class time should be highly structured to best prepare students for in-class activities; (2) it is useful to evaluate students’ pre-class preparation and for instructors to have access to this information; (3) class time is better spent having students engage in cooperative problem solving and discussions rather than listening and taking notes; and, (4) students benefit from more frequent structured practice and feedback in the classroom from a knowledgeable teacher. In this session participants will present and discuss examples of flipped mathematics courses and share the benefits and challenges of this type of pedagogy. Descriptions of unique models of flipped classes are welcome as are results of research on flipping pedagogy.

Jean McGivney-BurelleUniversity of Hartford
Larissa SchroederUniversity of Hartford
John WilliamsUniversity of Hartford
Fei XueUniversity of Hartford
Mako HarutaUniversity of Hartford
Ben PollinaUniversity of Hartford

Reading Guides in a Flipped Classroom

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Mary D Shepherd, Northwest Missouri State University

A Measured Approach to Flipping the Analysis Classroom

8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Christine Ann Shannon, Centre College

A Day in the Life of an Inverted Classroom

9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Reza O Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University
John T Sieben, Texas Lutheran University

Flipping the Classroom in Introductory Statistics

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Emily Cilli-Turner, Salve Regina University

Introductory Statistics in a Flipped Format for Community College Students

9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Jessica Knoch, Lane Community College

Math Bio or BioMath? Flipping a Mathematical Biology Course

10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Eric Eager, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

An Activity-Based Approach to Flipping Quantitative Literacy

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Rebecca Diischer, South Dakota State University

Flipping the Discrete Math Classroom

10:50 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.
Benjamin V.C. Collins, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
James A. Swenson, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Technology Tips for Creating Videos in a Flipped Mathematics Course

11:10 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.
Fei Xue, University of Hartford
Larissa Bucchi Schroeder, University of Hartford

Selling the Concept – a Primer on Salesmanship of the Flipped Classroom Model

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Alex Capaldi, Valparaiso University

Project-Based Curriculum, Part I

Friday, August 8, 8:50 a.m. – 11:25 a.m., Hilton Portland, Plaza Level, Broadway III & IV

One of the goals of mathematics teaching is enabling the learner to apply their mathematical knowledge to other disciplines and to real-world problems. One method to achieve this goal is project-based learning, which involves students attempting to solve interdisciplinary problems arising outside of the traditional classroom. The problems may arise from general social concerns or from within business, non-profit, or government organizations. Project-based learning can encourage inquiry, problem solving, collaboration, reasoning, and communication skills. We invite papers that address how project-based learning is facilitated at any level and the content of such projects. Evidence should be included as to the effectiveness of such projects and/or the system by which students engage in such projects.

Emek KoseSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Casey DouglasSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Angela GallegosLoyola Marymount University

A Project-Based General Education Math Course

8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Victor Ian Piercey, Ferris State University

High Dimensional Data Analysis Projects in a Freshman Mathematics Class

9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Bruce Piper, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Kristin Bennett, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

How to Sustain Projects in College Algebra and Finite Mathematics

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
David Jay Graser, Yavapai College

Researching the Effectiveness of Project-Based Learning in Elementary Statistics

9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Dianna Spence, University of North Georgia
Brad Bailey, University of North Georgia

Community-Based Projects Using Real-World Data

10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
G. Daniel Callon, Franklin College

Understanding Mathematics for Good: Undergraduates, Ethical Consulting, and Service Learning

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Judith E Canner, California State University, Monterey Bay

Mathematizing Social Justice: Bringing University Events into the Mathematics Classroom

10:50 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.
Ksenija Simic-Muller, Pacific Lutheran University

Modeling Calculus: A Project-Based, First Term Calculus Class

11:10 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg College
Brian J Birgen, Wartburg College

Open and Accessible Problems in Real or Complex and Analysis

Friday, August 8, 1:00 p.m. – 2:55 p.m., Hilton Portland, Plaza Level, Broadway I & II

Undergraduate research is more popular than ever, and there is a high demand for open and accessible problems for students to tackle.  Analysis is an area particularly suited for this research because it builds off of the foundational material that students learn in calculus. In addition, analysis is rich with problems that are easily stated, but more difficult to solve, and often lead to further questions for investigation. We invite presentations about open problems in real or complex analysis suitable for undergraduate research or joint faculty and undergraduate research.  Presentations concerning results about these types of problems, preferably with open questions remaining, are also welcome.

Lynette BoosProvidence College
Su-Jeong KangProvidence College

Quotient Sets

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Stephan Ramon Garcia, Pomona College

The Sum of Golden Ana Sets

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University

A Topology of Subdivision for the Real Numbers

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Jeffrey Clark, Elon University

Linear Operators, Zeros of Polynomials, and Orthogonal Polynomials

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Andrzej Piotrowski, University of Alaska Southeast

Locating the Roots of a Family of Polynomials: Three Open Questions

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Michael Brilleslyper, U.S. Air Force Academy
Beth Schaubroeck, U.S. Air Force Academy

The Two Body Problem Elevated to the Complex Domain

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Donald Leigh Hitzl, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab (Retired)
Frank Zele, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center (Retired)

Project-Based Curriculum, Part II

Friday, August 8, 1:00 p.m. – 3:55 p.m., Hilton Portland, Plaza Level, Broadway III & IV

One of the goals of mathematics teaching is enabling the learner to apply their mathematical knowledge to other disciplines and to real-world problems. One method to achieve this goal is project-based learning, which involves students attempting to solve interdisciplinary problems arising outside of the traditional classroom. The problems may arise from general social concerns or from within business, non-profit, or government organizations. Project-based learning can encourage inquiry, problem solving, collaboration, reasoning, and communication skills. We invite papers that address how project-based learning is facilitated at any level and the content of such projects. Evidence should be included as to the effectiveness of such projects and/or the system by which students engage in such projects.

Emek KoseSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Casey DouglasSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Angela GallegosLoyola Marymount University

Annexation Question Leads to Applied Project

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Nora Strasser, Friends University

Challenge-Based Instruction: Analysis of Bullet Proof Vest

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Andres Abelardo Padilla-Oviedo

Building a Successful Project-based Mathematical Modeling Course

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Jean Marie Linhart, Texas A&M University/Central Washington University

Encouraging Deeper Understanding Through Mathematical Modeling-Focused Projects

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Corban Harwood, George Fox University

PIC Math: Preparing Students for Careers in Business, Industry, and Government

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University

Embedding Undergraduate Research in a Senior Capstone Course

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Shawn Chiappetta, University of Sioux Falls

Implementing Project-Based Learning in the Differential Equations Curriculum

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Sukanya Basu, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Undergraduate Curriculum on the Relationship between Mathematics and Computer Science with Other Disciplines

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Agendia Timothy Atabong, Madonna University Nigeria

Using Matlab to Present Multidimensional Information

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Emma Smith Zbarsky, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Recreational Mathematics: New Problems and New Solutions, Part II

Friday, August 8, 1:00 p.m. – 4:35 p.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Galleria I

As with all mathematics, recreational mathematics continues to expand through the solution of new problems and the development of novel solutions to old problems. For the purposes of this session, the definition of recreational mathematics will be a broad one. The primary guideline used to determine the suitability of a paper will be the understandability of the mathematics. Papers submitted to this session should be accessible to undergraduate students.  Novel applications as well as new approaches to old problems are welcome.  Examples of use of the material in the undergraduate classroom are encouraged.

Paul CoeDominican University
Sara QuinnDominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Dominican University

The Elusive Mobius and the Intractable Hexagon: Geometric Cross Sections in Bead Crochet

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Susan Goldstine, St. Mary's College of Maryland
Ellie Baker, Freelance

Coloring the Plane with Rainbow Squares

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Mike Krebs, California State University, Los Angeles

Dividing the Plane: Variations on a Theme

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
David Molnar

Integer-Sided Triangles with Trisectible Angles

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Russ Gordon, Whitman College

On Mod n Spirals

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Andrew Richard Reiter
Robin Young, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Finding the Catalan Numbers in the Sandpile Model

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Grant Barnes, Luther College
Michael Johnson, Luther College
Cadence Sawyer, Luther College

A Characterization of Balance in Oriented Hypernetworks via Generalized Signed Walks

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Angeline Rao, Clements High School
Alexander Yang, Clements High School
Vinciane Chen, Westwood High School

Revisiting 12 Marbles, an Old-Fashioned Scale Puzzle

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Shenglan Yuan, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY

The Car Talk Trip

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Frank Lynch, Eastern Washington University

The James Function

4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Christopher N. B. Hammond, Connecticut College
Warren Johnson, Connecticut College
Steven J. Miller, Williams College

Exploring Five Integer Sequences Related to the Collatz Problem

4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Jay Lawrence Schiffman, Rowan University

Active Learning in Mathematics, Part II

Friday, August 8, 1:00 p.m. – 4:55 p.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Galleria II

Active learning is the process where students engage in activities such as reading, writing, or problem solving that encourage analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content. It has been well-known that active learning strategies increase student learning and have long- lasting effects on student success (Braxton, et al, 2008). For this session, we invite instructors of mathematics to discuss ways to promote this hands-on learning in the classroom. In particular, techniques that involve short reading, writing, or problem-solving prompts and exercises that are designed to reinforce classroom material are encouraged. Both examples of individual student active learning strategies and successful uses of group- related strategies (such as “think, pair, share” ideas) are welcome. The session is designed for instructors to share their experiences and provide useful tips and tricks on implementing these strategies and overcoming obstacles to active learning in general. Examples and ideas can come from any type of course, from undergraduate non-major service courses and early- major mathematics courses to late-major and even graduate-level classes. Speakers are encouraged to include assessment data on the effectiveness of their active learning strategies or empirical feedback from students and/or faculty about their strategies. Talks that focus on embodied activities that connect cognition with physical action in the classroom should submit talk proposals to the Embodied Activities in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics session.

David TaylorRoanoke College
Robert AllenUniversity of Wisconsin, La Crosse
Lorena BociuNorth Carolina State University

Surviving Active Learning in Mathematics

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Jerry Dwyer, Texas Tech University
Levi Johnson, Texas Tech University
Brock Williams, Texas Tech University

Activities for Calculus

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Matt Boelkins, Grand Valley State University

Student Conjecturing in Linear Algebra

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Elizabeth Thoren, University of California, Santa Barbara

Discovering Concepts in Calculus II

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
William Abrams, Longwood University

Opening Up the Space: Creating Collaborative Learning Environments Outside of the Classroom

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Randall E. Cone, Virginia Military Institute
Angie Hodge, University of Nebraska - Omaha

Test Tuesday

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Lew Ludwig, Denison University

Mathematics without the Math: Using Group Worksheets to Circumvent Math Anxiety

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Michael Nathanson, Saint Mary's College of California

Pre-Calculus Lab Book

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Brandy S Wiegers, National Association of Math Circles, Central Washington University
Addie Evans, SFSU
Servando Pineda, SFSU
Matthew Kim, SFSU

Algorithmic Thinking Unplugged with Puzzles and Games

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Edmund A Lamagna, University of Rhode Island

Using Games to Engage Students in Discrete Mathematics

4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Tim Gegg-Harrison, Winona State University
Nicole Anderson, Winona State University

Learning Math by Doing Math: Problem-Solving Workshops in Calculus

4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Silvia Saccon, The University of Texas at Dallas

Active Exploration of Graphs and Graph Theory

4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m.
Steven Klee, Seattle University

Curriculum Development to Support First Year Mathematics Students, Part I

Friday, August 8, 1:00 p.m. – 4:55 p.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Parlor AB

A common focus of university administration is student retention and graduation.  First year mathematics courses, both general education and major specific, have comparatively high drop/fail/withdraw rates.  This means that they are often scrutinized in regard to their effect on retention and graduation rates.  In this session, we would like to hear what you have been doing to respond to this scrutiny.  We hope to focus on departmental-wide efforts, rather than specific classroom approaches.  Presentations could include complete course redesign, co-requisite support courses, restructure of curriculum, departmental efforts to standardize, etc.  Note that we would like to hear about successful, in process, and unsuccessful initiatives. Presentations that include a description of the initiative along with data supporting the success or failure of these initiatives are especially encouraged. 

Donna FlintSouth Dakota State University
Rebecca DiischerSouth Dakota State University
Charles Bingen, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

Developmental Mathematics Redesign at Fitchburg State University

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.

Mary Ann Barbato, Fitchburg State University

Comparing Student Attitudes and Successes in College Algebra using Emporium, Problem Solving, and Traditional Methods

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Lanee Young, Fort Hays State University
Jeff Sadler, Fort Hays State University

Taking Over an Existing Developmental Math Program: What Works and Determining What to Improve

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Charles Bingen, University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

The Math Zone: An Open Emporium-Style Model Attempting the Fast Track

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Craig Miller, University of New Haven

The Startup of a Math Emporium - Trials and Tribulations

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Senan Hayes, Western Connecticut State University

Restructuring of the Remedial Program at South Dakota State University (SDSU)

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Donna Flint, South Dakota State University

Improving Remedial Success Using an Enhanced Mastery-Based Format

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Carri Hales, South Dakota State University

A Co-Requisite Model for College Algebra

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Rebecca Diischer, South Dakota State University

Rethinking First Year Mathematics to Improve Student Retention

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Cheryl Jarrell McAllister, Southeast Missouri State University
Daniel Daly, Southeast Missouri State University
Tamela Randolph, Southeast Missouri State University

It’s Not Just About the Content: Holistic Change in a First-Year Mathematics Course

4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Mary Beisiegel, Oregon State University
Krista Foltz, Oregon State University
Scott L. Peterson, Oregon State University

Peer Led Team Learning in Foundation Mathematics for College Students: A University Approach

4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Camille A McKayle, University of the Virgin Islands
Robert Stolz, University of the Virgin Islands

Improving Student Success in Calculus at the University of South Carolina

4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m.
Douglas B Meade, University of South Carolina
Philip B. Yasskin, Texas A&M University

Undergraduate Research in Mathematics: How, When, Why, Part II

Saturday, August 9, 8:30 a.m. – 11:25 a.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Galleria II

Opportunities for undergraduate research have increased dramatically in recent years. There are many benefits of doing and guiding undergraduate research. We invite talks on a range of topics including, but not limited to: involving students in mathematics research, reports on successful programs, how to set up programs, and research results. We are especially interested in presentations from mentors and program directors about how programs are run and evidence of their effectiveness. We also welcome presentations from students focused on their experience and learning outcomes (talks about their research results should be submitted to other sessions). This session seeks to expand the network of undergraduate researchers and facilitators, exchange new ideas, and help make undergraduate research more accessible.

Emek KoseSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Casey DouglasSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Angela GallegosLoyola Marymount University

Ensuring Engagement in Math Research

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University

6959 Open Problems for Undergraduates

8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Tom Edgar, Pacific Lutheran University

Exploring Auction Theory in Undergraduate Research

9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
William Gryc, Muhlenberg College

Singularities of 2-Dimensional Invertible Piecewise Isometric Dynamics

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Byungik Kahng, University of North Texas at Dallas

One Approach to Undergraduate Research in Computational Galois Theory

9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Chad Awtrey, Elon University

Undergraduate Research in Quantum Information Science

10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
David W. Lyons, Lebanon Valley College

Effective Undergraduate Research Using Questions Derived from Institutional Research and Computational Science

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Maria Zack, Point Loma Nazarene University

Undergraduate Research Projects with a Dozen or So Math, Physics and CS Students Over the Past Decade

10:50 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.
David Strong, Pepperdine University

Undergraduate Math Research at the US Naval Academy

11:10 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.
Will Traves, United States Naval Academy

Curriculum Development to Support First Year Mathematics Students, Part II

Saturday, August 9, 8:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Parlor AB

A common focus of university administration is student retention and graduation.  First year mathematics courses, both general education and major specific, have comparatively high drop/fail/withdraw rates.  This means that they are often scrutinized in regard to their effect on retention and graduation rates.  In this session, we would like to hear what you have been doing to respond to this scrutiny.  We hope to focus on departmental-wide efforts, rather than specific classroom approaches.  Presentations could include complete course redesign, co-requisite support courses, restructure of curriculum, departmental efforts to standardize, etc.  Note that we would like to hear about successful, in process, and unsuccessful initiatives. Presentations that include a description of the initiative along with data supporting the success or failure of these initiatives are especially encouraged. 

Donna FlintSouth Dakota State University
Rebecca DiischerSouth Dakota State University
Charles Bingen, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

A Multi-tiered Support System

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
G. Daniel Callon, Franklin College

An Effective Approach to Increase Mathematics Readiness of Freshmen STEM Students

8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Mazen Shahin, Delaware State University
Andrew Lloyd, Delaware State University
Tomasz Smolinski, Delaware State University
Melissa Harrington, Delaware State University

Creating a Mathematics First Year Seminar Course

9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Frederick Butler, York College of Pennsylvania

Designing a Mathematical Support Structure for Entering Students

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Emma Smith Zbarsky, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Amanda Hattaway, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Ophir Feldman, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Embedded Tutoring in First Year College Mathematics Classes

9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Michael Allen Lundin, Central Washington University

Requiring Instructor-Generated Learning Activities in Online College Algebra Can Reduce Failure and Withdrawal Rates

10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Jennifer Hegeman, Missouri Western State University

How a Co-Requisite Calculus I Lab Can Improve Student Success in Calculus I

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Sharon Vestal, South Dakota State University

Remedial Efforts in Calculus Classes at Simon Fraser University: Results and Challenges

10:50 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.
Malgorzata Dubiel, SFU
Justin Gray, SFU
Natalia Kouzniak, SFU
Cameron Morland, SFU
Jamie Mulholland, SFU

Concepts, not Calculations: Helping First Year Mathematics Students Learn What Mathematics Is

11:10 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.
Bonnie Gold, Monmouth University

Precalculus Redesign: The Influence of a Placement Program and the Power of a Name

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Alison Reddy, University of Illinois
Marc Harper

Curriculum Development to Support First Year Mathematics Students, Part III

Saturday, August 9, 1:00 p.m. – 2:35 p.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Parlor AB

A common focus of university administration is student retention and graduation.  First year mathematics courses, both general education and major specific, have comparatively high drop/fail/withdraw rates.  This means that they are often scrutinized in regard to their effect on retention and graduation rates.  In this session, we would like to hear what you have been doing to respond to this scrutiny.  We hope to focus on departmental-wide efforts, rather than specific classroom approaches.  Presentations could include complete course redesign, co-requisite support courses, restructure of curriculum, departmental efforts to standardize, etc.  Note that we would like to hear about successful, in process, and unsuccessful initiatives. Presentations that include a description of the initiative along with data supporting the success or failure of these initiatives are especially encouraged. 

Donna FlintSouth Dakota State University
Rebecca DiischerSouth Dakota State University
Charles Bingen, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

A Collaborative Transition to Applied Calculus with Modeling

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Robin A Cruz, The College of Idaho
Dave Rosoff, The College of Idaho
Nicole Seaders, Willamette University

Experiments with Large-Lecture/Lab Hybrid Models for Business Calculus

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Darci L. Kracht, Kent State University

Interactivity and Intervention: An Overview of Calculus Redesign at Missouri S&T

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Paul N Runnion, Missouri University of Science and Technology

ALEKS in Calculus I at the University of Wyoming

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Nathan P. Clements, University of Wyoming

Improving Student Success in Calculus

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Allison Henrich, Seattle University
J McLean Sloughter, Seattle University

Undergraduate Research in Mathematics: How, When, Why, Part III

Saturday, August 9, 1:00 p.m. – 3:55 p.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Galleria II

Opportunities for undergraduate research have increased dramatically in recent years. There are many benefits of doing and guiding undergraduate research. We invite talks on a range of topics including, but not limited to: involving students in mathematics research, reports on successful programs, how to set up programs, and research results. We are especially interested in presentations from mentors and program directors about how programs are run and evidence of their effectiveness. We also welcome presentations from students focused on their experience and learning outcomes (talks about their research results should be submitted to other sessions). This session seeks to expand the network of undergraduate researchers and facilitators, exchange new ideas, and help make undergraduate research more accessible.

Emek KoseSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Casey DouglasSt. Mary's College of Maryland
Angela GallegosLoyola Marymount University

Four Steps to Undergraduate Research Success!

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Stephan Ramon Garcia, Pomona College

Strategies for Mentoring Undergraduate Research Teams: Lessons Learned from the CURM Model

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Hannah Callender, University of Portland

Research Communities as a Vehicle to Boost Students’ Interest in Mathematical Research

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Alessandra Pantano, University of California, Irvine

A Student’s Perspective on Undergraduate Research

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Heather Gronewald, Southwestern University

Engaging Students as Math Researchers

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University

Mentoring Minority Undergraduate Students in Mathematics at Norfolk State University

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Aprillya Lanz, Norfolk State University

Year Long Undergraduate Research at Minimal Cost

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Zsuzsanna Szaniszlo, Valparaiso University

Undergraduate Research with Future Teachers

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Saad El-Zanati, Illinois State University

Balancing Undergraduate Research While Teaching Four Courses

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Britney Hopkins, University of Central Oklahoma
Kristi Karber, University of Central Oklahoma

More Favorite Geometry Proofs

Saturday, August 9, 1:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Galleria I

This session invites presenters to share their favorite undergraduate geometry proofs. These proofs should be suitable for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry courses as well as for courses frequently referred to as "modern" or "higher" geometry but not those related to differential geometry or (low-level) graduate courses. Proofs must be for theorems other than the Pythagorean Theorem and should be different from those presented during the MAA MathFest 2013 paper session (see http://www.framingham.edu/~smabrouk/Maa/mathfest2013/ for more information). Presenters must do the full proof, discuss how the proof fits into the course, provide information regarding prerequisite topics for the proof, and discuss associated areas with which students have difficulty and how such concerns are addressed so that students understand the proof. Presenters are invited to discuss how they have modified the proof over time as well as to share historical information for "classic" proofs and explorations/demonstrations that they use to help students understand the associated theorem.  Abstracts should include the theorem to be proved/discussed as well as brief background information.

Sarah MabroukFramingham State University

A Proof of Ptolemy's Theorem via Inversions

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Deirdre Longacher Smeltzer, Eastern Mennonite University

Archimedes’ Twin Circles in an Arbelos

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Dan C Kemp, South Dakota State University

Euler's Famous Line: Gateway to The Harmonic 2:1 Centroid Concurrency

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Alvin Swimmer, Arizona State University

Reflections in Geometry

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
David Marshall, Monmouth University

Reflections on Reflections

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Thomas Q Sibley, St. John's University

The Shortest Path Between Two Points and a Line

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Justin Allen Brown, Olivet Nazarene University

The Perfect Heptagon from the Square Hyperbola

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Genghmun Eng

The Many Shapes of Hyperbolas in Taxicab Geometry

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Ruth I Berger, Luther College

Geometry Knows Topology: The Gauss-Bonnet Theorem

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Jeff Johannes, SUNY Geneseo

Finding the Fermat Point by Physics and by Transformation

4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Philip Todd, Saltire Software

Year: 
2014

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