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Panels/Posters/Workshops

  1. Effective Strategies for Teaching Classes for Non-Majors
  2. Designing Studies to Measure the Effectiveness of Online Homework
  3. An Update on the Mathematical Education of Teachers II Report
  4. Issues for Early Career Mathematicians in Academia
  5. How Will CCSSM Influence High School and College Mathematics?
  6. Contemporary Approaches to Intermediate Algebra
  7. Mentoring Undergraduates on Research: A Kaleidoscope of Models
  8. The Job Search I: How to Apply for Jobs - Lessons for Academia and Industry
  9. The Job Search II: Interviewing and Hiring for Academic Jobs - Lessons from Both Sides of the Trenches
  10. CUPM "Birds of a Feather" Course Area Panel & Discussion
  11. Parenting on The Tenure Track
  12. SUMMA Session for Prospective REU Mentors

 


  • 1. Effective Strategies for Teaching Classes for Non-Majors
    Friday, August 3, 4:10 - 5:30 p.m., Ballroom B

    Organizers:
    • Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
    • Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University
    • Lerna Pehlivan, York University
    Panelists:
    • Michael Starbird, University of Texas Austin
    • Judith Grabiner, Pitzer College
    • Andrew Miller, Belmont University
    • Rachelle DeCosta, Wheaton College
    Sponsor:
    • SIGMAA QL

    Mathematics departments across the country serve non-majors in a variety of courses ranging from calculus for non-math majors to "math for liberal arts" courses to quantitative literacy courses. This panel brings together an eclectic selection of mathematicians with diverse perspectives on these courses and aims to answer the urgent question: How do we teach non-majors successfully? The speakers will address issues such as:

    • - What can be done to improve the effectiveness of courses for non-majors in large lecture settings?
    • - How do we successfully reach diverse populations in these courses? [Diversity here includes a broad spectrum of intended majors / fields / concentration areas and varying mathematical backgrounds, along with differences in socio-economic backgrounds and racial-ethnic identities.]
    • - What can we do to make non-required courses more attractive and engaging for non-majors?
    • - What learning strategies can be used in the classroom to improve learning for non-majors?
  • 2. Designing Studies to Measure the Effectiveness of Online Homework
    Friday, August 3, 1:00 - 2:20 p.m., Lecture Hall

    Organizers:
    • John Travis, Mississippi College
    • Jason Aubrey, University of Missouri
    Panelists:
    • Flora McMartin, Broad-based Knowledge
    • Andy Bennett, Kansas State University
    • Aaron Wangberg, Winona State University
    • Dale Dawes, City University of New York-Borough of Manhattan Community College
    Sponsor:
    • Committee on Technologies in Mathematics Education and WEB SIGMAA

    Online homework systems such as open source systems WeBWorK and WAMAP, commercial systems such as WebAssign, MapleTA and others have matured over the past decade to the point where the use of such systems has become mainstream within the service curriculum in mathematics. Anecdotal evidence indicates that there are significant benefits. This panel will focus on how to design and implement studies that measure how online homework effects variables associated with success in mathematics. Particular attention will be paid to the use and development of metrics for assessing changes in student learning and behavior, including factors such as persistence, self-efficacy, and retention.

    Panelists will present metrics they've used, their reliability in predicting student success, and the associated measurement instruments and study protocols. Following the presentation, time will be allowed for members of the audience to discuss techniques to utilize these metrics.

  • 3. An Update on the Mathematical Education of Teachers II Report
    Friday, August 3, 4:10 - 5:30 p.m., Lecture Hall

    Organizers:
    • Angie Hodge, University of Nebraska Omaha
    • Beth Burroughs, Montana State University
    • Judith Covington, University of Louisiana Shreveport
    Panelists:
    • William McCallum, University of Arizona
    • Al Cuoco, Educational Development Center
    • Alan Tucker, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    Sponsor:
    • Committee on the Mathematical Education of Teachers (COMET)

    The original CBMS report on the Mathematical Education of Teachers in 2001 offered recommendations about K-12 mathematics teacher preparation. The updated report includes recommendations for mathematics departments about teacher professional development as well. A panel of mathematicians who developed the update of the report will each discuss what they think are the most important implications of the document and will conduct an audience discussion about the document and its implications for university mathematics courses.

  • 4. Issues for Early Career Mathematicians in Academia
    Friday, August 3, 2:35 - 3:55 p.m., Lecture Hall

    Organizer:
    • Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University
    Panelists:
    • Rick Cleary, Bentley University
    • Jennifer Quinn, University of Washington Tacoma
    • Robert Talbert, Grand Valley State University
    Sponsor:
    • Committee on Early Career Mathematicians

    This session will begin with three speakers each addressing a different issue of concern for early career mathematicians. The issues will be

    1. getting tenure - a department chair's perspective (panelist Rick Cleary of Bentley University);
    2. finding your second job (panelist Robert Talbert); and
    3. joining the mathematical community (panelist Jennifer Quinn of the University of Washington).

    After all three speakers have finished an initial presentation, the audience will break into three groups to discuss these issues with the speakers as group leaders. Participants will also be encouraged to continue the discussion after the session.
  • 5. How Will CCSSM Influence High School and College Mathematics? 
    Saturday, August 4, 1:00 - 2:20 p.m., Lecture Hall

    Organizers:
    • Caren Diefenderfer, Hollins University
    • Semra Kilic-Bahi, Colby-Sawyer College
    • Martha Siegel, Towson University
    Panelists:
    • Meg Meyer, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    • Dan Teague, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics
    • Kristin Umland, University of New Mexico
    Sponsors:
    • Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM)
    • SIGMAA TAHSM
    • SIGMAA QL

    Panelists will discuss how the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics (CCSSM) might change high school and college mathematics classrooms in three specific areas:

    1. How CCSSM will change the topics taught in high schools?
    2. How CCSSM will or will not introduce elements of quantitative literacy?
    3. How CCSSM will change the mathematical background of students entering college?

    Panel members will describe possible curriculum changes that need to occur to meet the goals of CCSSM and explore challenges and opportunities these changes might present. In addition, the panelists will share their experiences on creating high school and college mathematics courses which emphasize content and context while improving students' Quantitative Literacy skills. Finally, the panelists will offer thoughts on whether CCSSM will change the overall knowledge and skills of first year college students.

  • 6. Contemporary Approaches to Intermediate Algebra
    Thursday, August 2, 2:35 - 3:55 p.m., Ballroom A

    Organizers:
    • Barbara Edwards, Oregon State University
    • Sarah L. Mabrouk, Framington State University
    Panelists:
    • Don Small, US Military Academy
    • Suzanne Doree, Augsburg College
    • Ann Sitomer, Portland Community College
    • Fourth Panelist TBA

    What do students need to learn in Intermediate Algebra to prepare them for mathematics and quantitative courses? Panelists will share innovative approaches that work. Audience members are encouraged to share their own successes.

  • 7. Mentoring Undergraduates on Research: A Kaleidoscope of Models
    Friday, August 3, 2:35 - 3:55 p.m., Ballroom B

    Organizer:
    • Jenna P. Carpenter, Louisiana Tech University
    Panelists:
    • Patrick Bahls, University of North Carolina at Asheville
    • Francis Su, Harvey Mudd College
    • Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University
    • Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College
    Sponsor:
    • Professional Development Committee
    •  

    The goal of this panel session is to share best practices, tips, resources, strategies and answer questions about successfully mentoring undergraduate students to conduct research. Four panelists will share perspectives representing a variety of institution types and sizes, both formal and informal programs, those focused on majors and non- majors, in an effort to provide a kaleidoscope of models for faculty interested in engaging in and improving their success in their mentoring endeavors.

  • 8. The Job Search I: How to Apply for Jobs - Lessons for Academia and Industry
    Thursday, August 2, 2:35 - 3:55 p.m., Lecture Hall 

    Organizer:
    • Estela Gavosto, University of Kansas
    Panelists:
    • James Freeman, Cornell College
    • Will Hickman, Epic Systems Corporation
    • Joanne Peeples, El Paso Community College
    • Kimberly Roth, Juniata College
    • Erika Ward, Jacksonville University
    Sponsor:
    • Committee on Graduate Students

    This panel session will focus on the application process for both academic and industry jobs. Topics that will be addressed include where to find job postings, how to tailor your cover letter and other application material to the job that you are applying to, selecting your references, and how you can be sure that your entire application package accurately describes you. There will be multiple opportunities for Q&A during the session.

  • 9. The Job Search II: Interviewing and Hiring for Academic Jobs - Lessons from Both Sides of the Trenches
    Thursday, August 2, 4:10 - 5:30 p.m., Lecture Hall

    Organizer:
    • Jenna Carpenter, Louisiana Tech University
    Panelists:
    • Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado
    • John Travis, Mississippi College
    • Jessica Mikhaylov, United States Military Academy
    • Louis Deaett, Quinnipiac University
    • Michael Stob, Calvin College
    Sponsor:
    • Professional Development Committee

    This panel session will focus on best practices and tips for successfully navigating the interview and hiring process for academic jobs. Panelists will include recent applicants, department chairs, and hiring committee members from a variety of institutions, from community colleges to liberal arts institutions to large state universities with a strong research focus. There will be a Q&A session at the end.

  • 10. CUPM "Birds of a Feather" Course Area Panel & Discussion
    Saturday, August 4, 2:35 - 3:55 p.m., Lecture Hall

    Organizer:
    • Martha Siegel, Towson University.
    Panelists:
    • TBA
    Sponsor:
    • Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM)

    The panel will focus on the preparation of the 2015 MAA (CUPM) Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences. Panelists will discuss the undergraduate major recognizing that the undergraduate major is not a single well-defined entity. The plan is provide a comprehensive guide to what constitutes a legitimate and professionally acceptable curriculum for the wide range of majors in the mathematical sciences. Five of the Course Area Study Groups will present the many questions and challenges in defining the core of the major, and ways in which such a core will be expected to change in the future. There will be time for small group discussion of specific course areas.

  • 11. Parenthood on the Tenure Track
    Thursday, August 2, 1:00 – 2:20 p.m., Lecture Hall

    Organizer:
    • Jacqueline Jensen, Slippery Rock University
    • Magnhild Lien, California State University Northridge
    • Maura Mast, University of Massachusetts Boston
    Panelists:
    • Deanna Haunsperger, Carleton College
    • Melanie Matchett Wood, University of Wisconsin Madison
    • Judy Walker, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Sponsor:
    • Association for Women in Mathematics

    In a 2010 Chronicle of Higher Education article, Dr. Mary Ann Mason from the University of California Berkeley wrote, "it is well established in the research on higher education that women are less likely to achieve tenure than men." She cites longitudinal data from the National Science Foundation showing that female scientists with children are 27% less likely to win tenure than male scientists with children. This jarring statistic reveals a need for the mathematics and science community to find ways to support women in tenure-track positions. The recently-announced NSF career-life balance initiative and other programs such as the ADVANCE grants suggest that some changes are taking place, but support for women with families still varies widely. In this session, several women professors will discuss their experiences, insights, ideas, tips and secrets to achieving success in their demanding mathematics careers while raising a family.

  • 11. SUMMA Session for Prospective REU Mentors
    Thursday, August 2, 4:10 – 5:20 p.m., Ballroom A

    Organizer:
    • William Hawkins, Jr., MAA and University of the District of Columbia
    • Robert Megginson, University of Michigan
    Panelists:
    • TBD

    The MAA has sponsored Summer Research Programs with funding from NSF and NSA since 2003. Each program consists of a small research group of at least four minority undergraduates mentored by a faculty member. About 97 sites have been funded as of summer 2012. Professor Gene Fiorini of Rutgers University, DIMACS, will describe his program and a collaboration with NY City Technical University. There will be ample time for questions. Funding will be available for sites during summer 2013. Additional information can be found on the NREUP website at /nreup.

 

  • Poster Session: PosterFest 2012: A Poster Session of Scholarship by Early Career Mathematicians and Graduate Students
    Friday, August 3, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m., Exhibit Hall

    Organizer:
    • Jennifer Roche Bowen, The College of Wooster
    Sponsor:
    • Early Career Mathematicians Committee, Graduate Student Committee, and the Young Mathematicians Network

    This poster session will allow early career mathematicians, including untenured faculty and graduate students, to present and discuss their scholarly activities with other attendees in an informal atmosphere. Examples of scholarly activities suitable for this poster session include expository work, preliminary reports, scholarship of teaching and learning, and research reports. Presenters should have their materials prepared in advance and will be provided with a self-standing, trifold tabletop poster approximately 48 in wide by 36 in high. Proposals should be submitted at /mathfest/abstracts. Questions regarding this session should be sent to the organizers.

 

  • Workshop 1: What's the Story? A Graduate Student Workshop on Creating Research Presentations for a General Audience
    Thursday, August 2, 1:00 - 2:20 p.m., Meeting Room R

    Organizer:
    • Rachel Schwell, Central Connecticut State University
    Sponsor:
    • Committee on Graduate Students and the Young Mathematicians Network

    Presenting our research to undergraduate students can be both fun and rewarding. It can also be difficult, however, since the gory details of our results often require a great deal of specific jargon and background. Nonetheless, the big ideas can almost always be presented at a variety of levels, and this workshop is designed to help participants develop the skills needed to formulate a presentation on their research that is appropriate for an audience of undergraduate students. Since many colleges and universities require giving such a talk as part of a job interview, almost any graduate student will have the opportunity to do so, and the ability to communicate complex mathematical ideas to students is a valued trait in a candidate. This workshop will consist of hands-on activities and audience interaction aimed toward developing and improving the necessary skills for creating an engaging and accessible presentation for undergraduates

  • Workshop 2: Writing for MAA Journals
    Saturday, August 4, 1:00 - 2:20 p.m., Ballroom A

    Organizer:
    • Michael Henle, Oberlin College

    This workshop offers hands-on guidance to prospective authors of expository papers intended for submission to the MAA journals. After a brief discussion of the nature of expository writing, editors and past-editors of the American Mathematical Monthly, Mathematics Magazine, The College Mathematics Journal, and Loci will be available to consult with writers. Participants are urged to bring their ideas for papers to the workshop regardless of the current state of their work, and if wishing to make arrangements in advance to consult an editor please write the organizer at cmj@oberlin.edu.

  • Workshop 3: Proposal Writing Workshop for Grant Applications to the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education
    Friday, August 3, 4:10 – 5:20 p.m., Ballroom A

    Organizer:
    • Ron Buckmire, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation
    • Lee Zia, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation

    Presenters will describe the general NSF grant proposal process and consider particular details relevant to programs in the Division of Undergraduate Education. This interactive session will feature a mock panel review using a series of short excerpts from sample proposals.

Year: 
2012

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