You are here

A (38) | B (43) | C (35) | D (64) | E (52) | F (14) | G (42) | H (79) | I (3) | J (22) | K (29) | L (47) | M (29) | N (18) | O (4) | P (89) | Q (1) | R (36) | S (40) | T (16) | U (1) | V (8) | W (63) | Y (1) | Z (1)
Keynes, John Maynard
It has been pointed out already that no knowledge of probabilities, less in degree than certainty, helps us to know what conclusions are true, and that there is no direct relation between the truth of a proposition and its probability. Probability begins and ends with probability.
The Application of Probability to Conduct.
Kepler, Johannes (1571-1630)
Nature uses as little as possible of anything.
Kepler, Johannes (1571-1630)
The chief aim of all investigations of the external world should be to discover the rational order and harmony which has been imposed on it by God and which He revealed to us in the language of mathematics.
Kepler, Johannes (1571-1630)
Where there is matter, there is geometry.
(Ubi materia, ibi geometria.)
J. Koenderink, Solid Shape, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1990
Kelley, John
A topologist is one who doesn't know the difference between a doughnut and a coffee cup.
In N. Rose, Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh, NC: Rome Press Inc., 1988.
Keller, Helen (1880 - 1968)
Now I feel as if I should succeed in doing something in mathematics, although I cannot see why it is so very important... The knowledge doesn't make life any sweeter or happier, does it?
The Story of My Life, 1903.
Kasner, E. and Newman
The testament of science is so continually in a flux that the heresy of yesterday is the gospel of today and the fundamentalism of tomorrow.
E. Kasner and J. R. Newman, Mathematics and the Imagination, Simon and Schuster, 1940.
Kasner, E. and Newman
Perhaps the greatest paradox of all is that there are paradoxes in mathematics.
Mathematics and the Imagination, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1940.
Kasner, E. and Newman
When the mathematician says that such and such a proposition is true of one thing, it may be interesting, and it is surely safe. But when he tries to extend his proposition to everything, though it is much more interesting, it is also much more dangerous. In the transition from one to all, from the specific to the general, mathematics has made its greatest progress, and suffered its most serious setbacks, of which the logical paradoxes constitute the most important part. For, if mathematics is to advance securely and confidently it must first set its affairs in order at home.
Mathematics and the Imagination, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1940.
Kasner, E. and Newman
Mathematics is often erroneously referred to as the science of common sense. Actually, it may transcend common sense and go beyond either imagination or intuition. It has become a very strange and perhaps frightening subject from the ordinary point of view, but anyone who penetrates into it will find a veritable fairyland, a fairyland which is strange, but makes sense, if not common sense.
Mathematics and the Imagination, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1940.

Pages

Dummy View - NOT TO BE DELETED