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Chronological Schedule

Wednesday, July 29

Workshop

1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

Please note: This ancillary workshop is occurring before general mathematical sessions commence on Wednesday, July 29. This event is offered at an additional fee to general registration. Advance registration is required to attend, with the option to order available through the registration portal.

Many mathematics departments are being asked to develop online courses but are hesitant to offer courses beyond their entry-level courses in this format. In this workshop, we will offer suggestions for how to develop and teach proof-based courses in a synchronous online environment such as Zoom, BlueJeans, Big Blue Button, or BlackBoard Collaborate, based on our expertise in running the University of Northern Colorado’s long-standing successful online Master’s degree program for in-service secondary teachers. Our workshop will include discussions about course designs led by experienced teachers; discussions of the technical logistics of running a course like this; examples of ways to incorporate active learning, student presentations, and small group work in breakout rooms into online classes; and a focus on teaching upper-level and graduate proof based courses. We hope that participants will come away feeling like you can do almost anything you would do in a physical classroom in a synchronous online environment. The workshop will also include an optional online follow-up session in September, 2020.

Registration Fee: $50

Organizers:
Nathaniel Miller, University of Northern Colorado
Jodie Novak, University of Northern Colorado
Virgil Pierce, University of Northern Colorado

Invited Address

Pi Mu Epsilon J. Sutherland Frame Lecture

Arithmetic and Digits

8:00 p.m. - 8:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Florian Luca, University of the Witwatersrand

In our recent paper in the Monthly (October, 2019) with Pante Stănică, we looked at perfect squares which arise when concatenating two consecutive positive integers like 183184 = 4282 with the smaller number to the left, or 98029801 = 99012 with the larger number to the left. My talk will present variations on this topic with the aim of providing the audience with examples of numbers which are both arithmetically interesting (like perfect squares) while their digital representations obey some regular patterns. The examples will not be limited to perfect squares, but will also include other old friends like Fibonacci numbers and palindromes.

Social Event

MAA-PME Student Reception

4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon E

Undergraduate students are invited to come for refreshments and a welcome to MathFest.

Other Mathematical Session

Math Jeopardy

5:30 p.m. - 6:15 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C & D

Answer: A fun undergraduate mathematics contest to lead off MathFest.
Question: What is Mathematics Jeopardy?

Four teams of students will provide the questions to go with the mathematical answers in many categories. All interested students in the audience can enter their names to be chosen to play on one of the four teams of four players. There will be prizes for all the participants. Come cheer for your favorite team. The session will be emceed by Michael Berry.

Organizers:
Michael W. Berry, University of Tennessee
Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University


Thursday, July 30

Invited Paper Session

Harmonic Analysis and Applications to Complex Analysis and Partial Differential Equations

8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

This invited paper session focuses on research problems at the interface between Harmonic Analysis, Complex Analysis, and Partial Differential Equations. This choice is motivated by the fact that combinations of techniques originating in these fields has proved to be extremely potent when dealing with a host of difficult and important problems in analysis. Indeed, there are many recent notable achievements in this direction whose degree of technical sophistication is truly breathtaking. The main scientific aims of this effort are to introduce young mathematicians (advanced undergraduate students, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows) to problems of interest in Harmonic Analysis, Complex Analysis and Partial Differential Equations, to strengthen their background in these areas, and to make them aware of possible new avenues of research and collaboration.

Organizer:
Irina Mitrea, Temple University
Jeongsu Kyeong, Temple University

Inverse Problems: Determining the Equation from the Solution

8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
Shari Moskow, Drexel University

Geometrically Stable Oscillatory Integral Operators

8:30 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
Ellen Urheim, University of Pennsylvania

A Sharp Divergence Theorem and Applications to Complex Analysis

9:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.
Dorina Mitrea, Baylor University

Mellin Analysis Techniques for Boundary Value Problems

9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Katharine Ott, Bates College

An Interplay between Fuglede Conjecture and Gabor Analysis

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.
Azita Mayeli, City University of New York

Singular Integral Operators for Elliptic Boundary Value Problems

10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Jeongsu Keyong, Temple University

Invited Paper Session

Surprising Discoveries by Amateur Mathematicians, Part A

8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

This session will focus on sometimes overlooked non-professionals who have solved interesting mathematical problems or made significant contributions to mathematical knowledge. These persons had no formal education in higher mathematics and pursued mathematical investigations in their own way. Martin Gardner inspired such amateurs throughout his career. Indeed, he himself never completed a math course past high school, yet contributed new mathematical results, many of them published in award-winning MAA papers. From the 19th century and earlier, we will learn of the mathematical contributions of Benjamin Franklin, Mary Somerville, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Kirkman, Henry Dudeney, and Alicia Boole Stott. From the 20th century to the present, in addition to Gardner, we will learn of patent officer Harry Lindgren, artist George Odom, postal worker Robert Ammann, surgeon Jan Gullberg, artist Anthony Hill and others. On Saturday, the Martin Gardner Lecture will feature three other amateur mathematicians who made surprising discoveries: M.C. Escher, Marjorie Rice, and Rinus Roelofs.

Organizers:
Doris Schattschneider, Professor Emerita of Mathematics, Moravian College
Colm Mulcahy, Spelman College

Is Mathematics too Serious a Matter to Be Left to Mathematicians?

8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
Peter Renz, Retired Editor (W. H. Freeman and Co., Birkhaüser Boston, Academic Press)

Benjamin Franklin, 230 Years Later

8:30 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
Paul C. Pasles, Villanova University

‘The Philosopher in His Study, the Literary Lady in Her Boudoir’: How Mary Somerville Transcended the Amateur Status of 19th-Century Scientific Women

9:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.
Brigitte Stenhouse, The Open University

The Reverend Thomas P. Kirkman: What Did He Do Besides Inventing the Fifteen Schoolgirls Problem?

9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Ezra (Bud) Brown, Virginia Tech

Florence Nightingale’s Notes on Victorian Officials’ Misunderstanding of Basic Mathematical Calculations and Management of Data

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.
Noel-Ann Bradshaw, London Metropolitan University

Henry Dudeney: Amateur Mathematician?

10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Charles Ashbacher, Charles Ashbacher Technologies

Contributed Paper Session

Math In Action

8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom J

Mathematics is in action within many beautiful non-mathematical settings, spanning from interplays with the sciences, to unexpected applications to games, art, social justice, and economics, among others. This session invites presenters to share work in which mathematics is used in another field. We encourage joint presentations by teams or advisor-student pairs. This session is in conjunction with the IPS “Women In Math: Math In Action”

Organizers:
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Emelie Kenney, Siena College
Sarah Wolff, Denison University

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics

Contributed Paper Session

Practices to Reduce Mathematics Anxiety

8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

This session features papers on practices that have helped students overcome mathematics anxiety, such as classroom or office hours interventions, course-wide approaches to teaching and learning, course revision, and program-wide reforms. Papers may also be about research on math anxiety or practices that were intended to help students overcome their mathematics anxiety but did not achieve this objective.

Organizers:
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Debra K. Borkovitz, Boston University
Raman Rohatgi, Saint Mary's College at Notre Dame
Zoe Misiewicz, State University of New York at Oswego
Azadeh Rafizadeh, William Jewell College
Timothy Goldberg, Lenoir-Rhyne University
Maria Fung, Worcester State University

Contributed Paper Session

Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Experiences in Mathematics

8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon L

A Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) is a practice of scientific disciplines (fewer in math) embedding research experiences into classrooms. This session seeks evidenced-based practices implementing research into classrooms at all levels with the goal to define a CURE experience in math. Presentations may include class projects, activities, whole semester projects or other forms of mathematical research within a course.

Organizers:
Peri Shereen, CSU Monterey Bay
Lipika Deka, CSU Monterey Bay
Jeffrey Wand, CSU Monterey Bay

Contributed Paper Session

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Mathematics

8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

National data trends indicate a need to shift representation in mathematics with respect to diversity, equity, and inclusion. In response, many departments and instructors have sought to understand the barriers that inhibit persistence and success in mathematics, particularly among underrepresented minority, first-generation, low-income, and female students. This session invites presenters to share how they engage diverse student populations.

Organizers:
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Chad Topaz, Williams College
Ranthony A.C. Edmonds, Ohio State University

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Teaching & Learning, Part A

8:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) aims to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. IBL methods help students develop deep understanding by connecting them with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on IBL teaching and learning methods. Talks on successful IBL activities, evidence-based IBL research, and talks that can help new IBL instructors are especially encouraged.

Organizers:
Carl Mummert, Marshall University
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Amy Ksir, US Naval Academy
Nathaniel Miller, U. Northern Colorado
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Panel Session

Adaptation of Innovation: Making Math Pathways Work for All Students

8:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

This panel addresses how faculty adapt math pathways innovations to meet the needs of students in different institutional and community contexts. Specifically, faculty from tribal colleges, SUNY colleges, CA colleges, and high school-college partnerships in the Pacific Islands will share how they have adapted the curriculum and instructional practices of the Carnegie Math Pathways to address the needs and goals of their students and communities.

Organizer:
Ann Edwards, Carnegie Math Pathways/WestEd

Panelists:
Earle Crosswait, Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College
Dan Ray, WestEd/Carnegie Math Pathways

Poster Session

Outreach Poster Session

8:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon F

All community members involved in outreach activities are welcome to present a poster on those activities. These outreach activities can be camps for middle school children, seminars or symposia for undergraduate women, Sonia Kovalevski Days, etc. We want to hear about the good work you are doing encouraging diversity and inclusion in mathematics.

Organizer:
Rachelle Decoste, Wheaton College

Workshop

Co-requisite Courses: Essential Considerations

8:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

Institutions and states are seeing a remarkable number of co-requisite students pass gateway level mathematics courses in half the time or less. What are these institutions doing? What should faculty consider when designing support courses? Join Dana Center staff to explore 4 essential considerations, including ideas about the essential foundational concepts and cultural shifts necessary for students to succeed in co-requisite courses.

Organizers:
Frank Savina, University of Texas - Charles A. Dana Center
Joan Zoellner, University of Texas - Charles A. Dana Center

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Rooms 411, 412, 413

Pi Mu Epsilon student members who wish to represent their chapters as student speakers or official delegates should visit the PME website at http://pme-math.org/ for more information.

Please note: all student presenters are required to be registered for MAA MathFest.

Organizer:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m. Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Rooms 404, 405, and 410

The MAA Student Paper Sessions abstract portal is now live! Please click here to submit an abstract.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

Lecture Title and Abstract TBA

9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Sommer Gentry, US Naval Academy

Minicourse

Minicourse 1. Linear Algebra in Computer Graphics and Data Science, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

This minicourse will cover linear algebra applications from computer graphics and data science. The depth will range from those that require little mathematical background (submatrices, matrix arithmetic) to more sophisticated topics (eigenanalysis, singular value). The minicourse will also provide webpages that enable experimentation without any coding and also provide codes that serve as a template for student exploration.

Organizer:
Tim Chartier, Davidson College

Sponsor: MAA CUPM

Minicourse

Minicourse 8. The Who, Why, and How of Undergraduate Research in Math, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

This minicourse will be an open discussion on undergraduate research in mathematics. From why and how to do it, to where to find, or come up with, good accessible problems, we will discuss our experiences and come up with a plan to be implemented the following academic year. This will be a hand on, active learning workshop and attendants will be expected to work.

Organizer:
Alicia Prieto Langarica, Youngstown State University
Cindy Wyels, California State University-Channel Islands

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Minicourse

Minicourse 11. Teaching Math Courses for Elementary Education Majors, Part A

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

Teaching mathematics courses for future elementary teachers is an exciting and challenging experience. Different schools offer a variety of hours and courses. How do you decide what should be in the course at your institution? This session will discuss techniques and topics that should be a part of such a course or courses. We will talk about publications that help guide you as you teach this course and methods that have been found to be successful in such a course. All are welcome in the minicourse and having access to your current course descriptions will be helpful, if you have them.

Organizer:
Judith Covington, Northwestern State University

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Panel Session

Career Paths in Business, Industry, and Government

9:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center Room 202B

You’re about to earn a degree in mathematics. Now what? You may already know that teaching isn’t your only option, but perhaps you're still unsure of what other job opportunities are available in nonacademic settings. Whether you are a student looking for a job once you graduate or an advisor looking for advice to give your students, this panel will help you gain new perspectives on career experiences in business, industry, and government.

Organizers:
Emille D. Lawrence, University of San Francisco
Caroline Maher-Boulis, Lee University

Panelists:
Kevin Byrnes, DuPont Capital Management
Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University and Mathematical Association of America
Emilie Purvine, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Bonita Saunders, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Sponsors:
MAA Committee on Undergraduate Students
MAA Committee on Business, Industry, and Government

Workshop

Learning How to Lead a Book Study Group for the Instructional Practices Guide

9:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

The MAA Instructional Practices Guide (IP Guide) offers guidance on leveraging evidence-based practices to improve undergraduate learning in mathematics. To help individuals engage with the IP Guide, the MAA sponsored the development of a 10-week Book Study Guide. After an introduction to the IP Guide and the Book Study Guide, attendees will participate in an interactive session that will prepare them to use the documents to meet their needs.

Organizers:
Erica R. Miller, Virginia Commonwealth University
Jessica Libertini, Virginia Military Institute
Emily Braley, Harvard University

Sponsors:
MAA Committee on the Teaching of Undergraduate Mathematics
MAA Committee on Assessment

Invited Address

AMS-MAA Joint Invited Lecture

Eigenvalues and Graphs

10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.,Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Steven Butler, Iowa State University

One way to store information about a graph is by an array with entries indexed by pairs of vertices with each entry giving information about a relationship between the pair. The linear algebraist in us would say, ``let's change our names and instead of calling it an array, let us call it a matrix, which is an array with benefits''. Among these benefits are the eigenvalues and singular values of the matrix. The eigenvalues give information about the linear transformation to which the matrix corresponds, and this can capture some structural properties of the graph (often with just knowing a few of the extremal eigenvalues). This provides a way to obtain information about a graph with just a handful of parameters. We will explore several different possible matrices and look at some of the information that we can, and in some cases cannot, learn by studying the eigenvalues.

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Lecture I

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Jordan Ellenberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Minority Chairs Meeting

12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, MAA Suite

Organizer:
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Rooms 411, 412, 413

Pi Mu Epsilon student members who wish to represent their chapters as student speakers or official delegates should visit the PME website at http://pme-math.org/ for more information.

Please note: all student presenters are required to be registered for MAA MathFest.

Organizer:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Rooms 404, 405, and 410

The MAA Student Paper Sessions abstract portal is now live! Please click here to submit an abstract.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Invited Address

Chan Stanek Lecture for Students

Stories About How I Got Where I Am Today

1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Erica Flapan, Pomona College

I will talk about my life, from elementary school to becoming the Editor in Chief of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society. While my history is quite different from that of most mathematicians, I hope that hearing stories about my trials and tribulations can inspire young mathematicians facing their own trials and tribulations to keep at it as I did and become mathematicians who can then tell their own stories to the next generation of young mathematicians. This talk will include a little bit of knot theory, a little bit of spatial graph theory, a little bit of chemistry, and a little bit of humor. But mostly, it will just be stories.

Invited Paper Session

Implications for Practice: Applying Education Research to our Shared Disciplinary Work

1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom B

In recent years, the work of mathematics education researchers and practitioners has drawn closer as our understanding of a shared commitment to equitable and effective pedagogy has developed, as the emphasis placed on evidence-based practices has spread, and as the challenges facing higher education mathematics instruction have grown larger and changed more rapidly. Many practitioners are hungry for coherent and well-considered guidance from the literature, and many researchers are hungry for their work to impact the larger issues that motivates their research. However, this collaboration remains challenging or slow in part because of the separate spaces and ways in which researchers and practitioners do this work.

The goals of this session are to accelerate and increase the impact of recent and ongoing education research on undergraduate mathematics teaching and learning and to bridge these disciplinary spaces by highlighting exemplary models of research being applied to improve practice. Practitioners can expect to learn how to leverage research to improve their practice in responsible ways, and education researchers can expect to see exemplars of research applied in action. Discussions between the presentations will support the expansion of practitioner-researcher communication.

Organizer:
Brian Katz, Smith College

Quantitative Reasoning and Symbolization Activity: Do Individuals Expect Calculations and Expressions to Have Quantitative Significance?

1:30 p..m. - 1:50 p.m.
Alan O'Byran, Arizona State University

The Teaching and Learning of Logic

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Paul Christian Dawkins, Texas State University

Adapting K-12 Teaching Routines to the Advanced Mathematics Classroom

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Kathleen Melhuish, Texas State University
Kristen Lew, Texas State University
Taylor Baumgard, Texas State University
Brittney Ellis, Portland State University

Calculus Video Project: Theoretical Design Principles for Supporting Students’ Learning from Instructional Videos

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Aaron Weinberg, Ithaca College
Jason Martin, University of Central Arkansas
Matt Thomas, Ithaca College

Supporting the Adoption of Evidence-Based Pedagogies with Peer Observation

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Valerie Peterson, University of Portland
Stephanie Salomone, University of Portland
Heather Dillon, University of Portland
Carolyn James, University of Portland
Eric Anctil, University of Portland
Tara Prestholdt, University of Portland

An Analysis of Undergraduate Precalculus and Calculus Instructors’ Gatekeeping Practices and Their Impact on Racially Minoritized Students

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Brittany Marshall, Rutgers University
Taylor McNeill, Vanderbilt University
Luis Leyva, Vanderbilt University

Invited Paper Session

Open and Accessible Areas in Computational Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Mathematics research employ modern computational tools (such as computer algebra systems and programming environments) to investigate mathematical concepts, formulate questions, perform mathematical experiments, gather numerical evidence, and test conjectures. Computational tools can help make certain areas of mathematics research accessible to students, providing points of entry where students can formulate and explore questions in number theory, algebra, topology, and more.

This session will highlight areas of mathematics where computational tools allow students to grapple with open questions. Talks will be aimed at a broad, non-expert audience. The use of computation for investigating mathematical topics, rather than computation employed for statistical analysis, is preferred. Discussion of connections between computational investigation and proof is encouraged.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

Patterns in Generalized Permutations

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Lara Pudwell, Valparaiso University)

How Neuroscience Provides an Accessible Context for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Victor Barranca, Swarthmore College

Computing Hyperelliptic Invariants from Period Matrices

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Christelle Vincent, University of Vermont

Bringing Intuition from Euclidean Geometry to Finite Metric Spaces

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Don Sheehy, North Carolina State University

An Undergraduate Course in Computational Mathematics

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Matthew Richey, St. Olaf College

Invited Paper Session

Surprising Discoveries by Amateur Mathematicians, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

This session will focus on sometimes overlooked non-professionals who have solved interesting mathematical problems or made significant contributions to mathematical knowledge. These persons had no formal education in higher mathematics and pursued mathematical investigations in their own way. Martin Gardner inspired such amateurs throughout his career. Indeed, he himself never completed a math course past high school, yet contributed new mathematical results, many of them published in award-winning MAA papers. From the 19th century and earlier, we will learn of the mathematical contributions of Benjamin Franklin, Mary Somerville, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Kirkman, Henry Dudeney, and Alicia Boole Stott. From the 20th century to the present, in addition to Gardner, we will learn of patent officer Harry Lindgren, artist George Odom, postal worker Robert Ammann, surgeon Jan Gullberg, artist Anthony Hill and others. On Saturday, the Martin Gardner Lecture will feature three other amateur mathematicians who made surprising discoveries: M.C. Escher, Marjorie Rice, and Rinus Roelofs.

Organizers:
Doris Schattschneider, Professor Emerita of Mathematics, Moravian College
Colm Mulcahy, Spelman College

Alicia Boole Stott in the Fourth Dimension

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Moira Chas, Stony Brook University

The Exquisite Geometric Dissections of Harry Lindgren

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Greg N. Frederickson, Purdue University

Martin Gardner - "Are You a Mathematician?"

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Dana Richards, George Mason University

LOOK! George Phillips Odom Jr. and a Search for an Understanding Order

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Dick Esterle, https://www.dickesterle.com

Robert Amman (1946 - 1994): Postman and More

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Marjorie Senechal, Smith College

Anthony Hill and The Crossing Number

4:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.
Marcus Schaefer, DePaul University

Contributed Paper Session

Real World Examples in Abstract Algebra & Number Theory

1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J

Providing context to topics from an undergraduate abstract algebra or number theory course helps ground the concepts in reality, increase engagement and spur interest. In these talks presenters will share their best real world example from these courses; providing an overview of the mathematical concept and explaining how their example is related to the underlying mathematics. Talks should be accessible to undergraduate mathematics majors.

Organizers:
Scott Williams, University of Central Oklahoma
Erin Williams, University of Central Oklahoma

Contributed Paper Session

Classroom Capsules and Student Enrichment

1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom I

This session focuses on mathematics accessible to undergraduates but not part of the standard curriculum. Classroom Capsules offer a fresh take on a topic in the undergraduate curriculum and include tips for classroom use. Student Enrichment talks focus on extracurricular topics suited, say, for a colloquium talk. Ideas should be novel, be surprising, or deserve to be more widely known, e.g. elegant proofs, extensions of standard topics, novel applications, or striking historical links.

Organizers:
Dan Kalman, American University
Bud Brown, Virginia Tech
James Parson, Hood College
Jill Tysse, Hood College

Contributed Paper Session

Games in Math Circles

1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

We will focus on games in math circles. Such games are fun to play but they also offer opportunities for participants to think deeply about optimal strategies and do meaningful computations. Computer simulations of games or the coding of a master player that the circle can compete against are possibilities. Some games are not what they seem as they can be nearly determined by the opening setup but seeing this involves some deep funstration.

Organizer:
Edward C. Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry-Based Teaching & Learning, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) aims to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. IBL methods help students develop deep understanding by connecting them with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. This session invites scholarly presentations on IBL teaching and learning methods. Talks on successful IBL activities, evidence-based IBL research, and talks that can help new IBL instructors are especially encouraged.

Organizers:
Carl Mummert, Marshall University
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Amy Ksir, US Naval Academy
Nathaniel Miller, U. Northern Colorado
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Panel Session

Imagine a World in Which Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching is an Integral Application in Mathematics Courses

1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

The MAA META Math project (NSF DUE 1726624) adds "secondary mathematics teaching" to the list of legitimate application areas of mathematics by creating easy-to-integrate curriculum materials for each mathematics major course. Just as it is standard to include "applications to engineering" problems, say, in problem sets, why not include "applications to secondary mathematics" problems too? Members of MAA META Math share the impact of their work.

Organizers:
James Tanton, Mathematical Association of America
Nancy Ann Neudauer, Pacific University

Panelists:
Nancy Ann Neudauer, Pacific University
James Tanton, Mathematical Association of America
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University
Brittney Falahola, Stephen F. Austin State University
Susan Hollingsworth, Edgewood College

Poster Session

MAA Contributed Poster Sessions, Session I

1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon F

The MAA is pleased to continue with the MAA Contributed Poster Session (CPS) at MathFest 2020 in Philadelphia, PA. The overwhelming consensus among organizers and participants is that poster sessions provide an excellent opportunity to share participants’ work, to network with attendees who share interests with the presenters, and to learn from the attendees. Our goal is to leverage the poster session format to increase engagement between presenters and their audience. We will rotate the poster categories throughout the meeting, each rotation will last 45 minutes, and the number of rotations will depend on the number of accepted posters. The MAA will provide corkboards or trifolds for the posters – you just need to bring your poster.

Submitting an abstract for the poster session in the areas of mathematics, pedagogy, and undergraduate mathematics curriculum is no different than submitting an abstract for the contributed paper session. To submit an abstract for MAA MathFest 2020 go to www.maa.org/mathfest/abstracts and follow the instructions found there. The deadline for submission of abstracts is April 30, 2020. Early submissions are encouraged. When you submit your abstract, you will be asked to place it in one of the following categories:

  • Assessment
  • History and Philosophy of Mathematics
  • Interdisciplinary Topics in Mathematics
  • Mathematics and Technology
  • Mentoring
  • Modeling and Applications
  • Outreach
  • Teaching and Learning Advanced Mathematics
  • Teaching and Learning Calculus
  • Teaching and Learning Developmental Mathematics
  • Teaching and Learning Introductory Mathematics
  • Teaching and Learning Other Mathematics
  • Algebra
  • Analysis
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Geometr
  • Graph Theory
  • Linear Algebra
  • Logic and Foundations
  • Number Theory
  • Probability and Statistics
  • Other than the above

Please consult this year's Call for Posters for more information on the sessions in general, and what to expect for submitting and preparing presentations.

Poster Session

Aligning Courses in the First Two Years with the Instructional Practices Guide and AMATYC IMPACT

1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon F

The Instructional Practices Guide gives evidence-based ideas for classroom, assessment, and design practices. AMATYC's IMPACT document gives guidance on influencing students' mathematical prowess. This poster session invites participants to share an IP or IMPACT-aligned strategy in a course typically in the first two years of college. Posters from two-year college faculty and experienced graduate student teaching assistants are highly encouraged.

Organizer:
Chris Oehrlein, Oklahoma City Community College

Sponsor: Committee on Two-Year Colleges (CTYC)

Workshop

Past and Present Contributions of Black Mathematicians: Developing Positive Math Identities of Black Students

1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

For many students stories of black achievement in mathematics are assumed to be nonexistent. To support student learning, it is important to share with all students their rightful role models of mathematical excellence. We will, 1) discuss contributions of the African Diaspora to the development of mathematics, 2) explore math tasks taken from a historical perspective, and 3) discuss how participants can adapt these tasks for classroom use.

Organizers:
Shelly M. Jones, Central Connecticut State University
Robin Wilson, Cal Poly Pomona

Minicourse

Minicourse 4. Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings, Part A

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Hands-on, practical art puzzles inspire the mathematics of projective geometry \(-\) the study of properties invariant under projective transformations. We explore activities in perspective art or photography that motivate concepts in projective geometry, including Desargues' Theorem and numerical projective invariants. Activities in problem solving and proof are suitable for a sophomore-level proofs class. No artistic experience is required.

Organizers:
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin and Marshall College
Fumiko Futamura, Southwestern University

Sponsor: SIGMAA Arts

Minicourse

Minicourse 5. Introduction to WeBWorK: An Open-Source Alternative to Generate and Deliver Online Homework Problems, Part A

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

Participants will learn to utilize the opensource online homework system WeBWorK. Adopted by over 1200 institutions, WeBWorK includes an extensive, curated library of over 35,000 exercises encompassing the collegiate curriculum. Subjects include College Algebra, Calculus, ODEs, Linear Algebra, Statistics, and Introduction to Proofs. Participants will learn how to utilize WeBWorK in their classrooms and to edit WeBWorK exercises.

Organizers:
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education

Minicourse

Minicourse 6. Jumpstarting your Scholarship Program, Part A

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

The two days of this course will have different foci. One will feature an overview of the NSF, consisting of an introduction to programs that support both research in the mathematical sciences and innovations in learning and teaching, together with tips for writing strong proposals. During the second session, we will discuss numerous aspects of a scholarship program, including how to find possible problems and collaborators, presenting your research, writing up your results, and getting your work published. We will also spend time setting goals and priorities for the upcoming year or two and make a plan for how to achieve those goals. Both days will provide plenty of time for questions and discussion.

Organizers:
Alissa Crans, Loyala Marymount University
Karen Keene, National Science Foundation, DUE
Michelle Manes, National Science Foundation, DMS

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Invited Address

AWM-MAA Etta Zuber Falconer Lecture

Complex Functions, Mesh Generation, and Hidden Figures in the NIST Digital Library of Mathematical Functions

2:30 p.m. - 3:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Bonita V. Saunders, National Institute of Standards and Technology

In 2010, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) launched the Digital Library of Mathematical Functions (DLMF), a free online compendium of definitions, recurrence relations, differential equations, and other crucial information about mathematical functions useful to researchers working in application areas in the mathematical and physical sciences. Although the DLMF replaces the widely cited National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Handbook of Mathematical Functions commonly known as Abramowitz and Stegun (A&S), it is far beyond a book on the web, incorporating web tools and technologies for accessing, rendering, and searching math and graphics content. I will discuss some interesting historical tidbits, but then focus on past and present technical research challenges being tackled to develop the DLMF’s graphics content. The DLMF currently contains more than 600 2D and 3D figures, and over 200 interactive 3D web visualizations of high level mathematical function surfaces that users can explore.

Panel Session

Implementation of Co-requisite Models

3:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

Many states and institutions are moving to co-requisite models for developmental mathematics. This panel discusses best practices of such models, as well as issues with implementation. In particular, how does a state or system support co-requisite creation? Are there policies that impede the formation of a model? What is the process for creation of co-requisite courses at the institution level?

Organizers:
Jennifer Nordstrom, Linfield College
Wade Ellis, West Valley College, Retired

Panelists:
Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, Lamar University
Kathryn Kozak, Coconino Community College
Vilma Mesa, University of Michigan
Jessie Walker, Arkansas Department of Education
Linus Yu, University of Arkansas-Fort Smith

Sponsor: MAA Subcommittee on Curriculum Renewal Across the First Two Years (CRAFTY)

Workshop

Navigating Academia as an Underrepresented Early Career Mathematician

3:00 p..m. - 4:20 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

Navigating academia as an underrepresented mathematician comes with a unique set of challenges due to isolation and the invisible labor associated with diversity related service, in addition to traditional stressors tied to career advancement. This interactive session will focus on how early career mathematicians can best align their personal and career goals with traditional institutional expectations regarding scholarship and service to support optimal career trajectories. This workshop welcomes early career faculty, postdocs, and graduate students as well as anyone looking to support individuals in these groups.

Organizers:
Ranthony A.C. Edmonds, The Ohio State University
Andrea Arauza Rivera, California State University, East Bay
Alexander Barrios, Carleton College
Ryan Moruzzi, Jr., California State University, East Bay
Anisah Nu’Man, Spelman College

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Section Officers Meeting

3:00 p.m. - 4:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon L

This session is moderated by Lisa Marano, West Chester University, Chair of the MAA Committee on Sections. It is open to all section officers and their guests.

Minicourse

Minicourse 2. Teaching Introductory Statistics: Focus on Concepts and Data, Part A

3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

This minicourse provides hands-on activities, practical advice, and assessment strategies for teaching introductory statistics based on the American Statistical Association’s recommendations. These recommendations call for emphasizing statistical thinking and conceptual understanding, implementing active learning with interactive software, using real data from genuine studies, and including assessments that promote student learning.

Organizers:
Allan Rossman, Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo
Beth Chance, Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Minicourse

Minicourse 7. Game Theoretic Modeling for Math Majors, Part A

3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

This minicourse introduces some game theoretic tools (utility functions, strategic games of complete and incomplete information, and coalition games) and their application to economic, political, and biological scenarios. Along the way, participants will engage in games (perhaps winning some money or other prizes!) and discover some ways to incorporate activities and content into their own courses in game theory, modeling, or calculus.

Organizers:
David Housman, Goshen College
Richard Gillman, Valparaiso University

Minicourse

Minicourse 9. Mathematics for Social Justice, Part A

3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

How can mathematics faculty foster critical thinking and empower students to analyze social justice issues? This session provides examples of applications of mathematics and statistics to real-world issues, such as racial profiling, environmental justice, and more. Participants will be able to incorporate examples and projects into a variety of courses and approach developing their own; beginners and experts are welcome.

Organizers:
Lily Khadjavi, Loyola Marymount University
Maria Mercedes Franco, Queensborough Community College (CUNY)

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Other Mathematical Session

Estimathon!

4:00 p.m. - 5:45 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 201 C

They're called Fermi problems...
How heavy is the Eiffel Tower?
How many prime numbers have distinct digits?
How many calories would you be eating if you had "one of everything" at the Cheesecake Factory?

If you're looking for a mindbending mixture of math and trivia, look no further! Jane Street Capital presents The Estimathon contest: teams will have 30 minutes to work on 13 problems, ranging from totally trivial to positively Putnamesque. Can your team beat the all-time best score?? The top teams will receive prizes! As in past years, we will run 2 contests. Feel free to show up to either one!

(Please show up 15 minutes before the start time of the contest you want to join.)

Our target schedule is as follows:
4:00 pm. Welcome, overview of rules and scoring
4:15 pm. Estimathon contest #1
5:00 pm. Estimathon contest #2

Organizer:
Andy Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Panel Session

Graduate School in Mathematics: What’s it Like, and How Do You Get In?

4:30 p.m. - 5:50 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

This panel is for undergraduates considering graduate school in the mathematical sciences. Graduate students in mathematics must take courses, pass qualifying exams, write a thesis, and serve as a Teaching Assistant. We discuss how these may vary from school to school and then focus on the application process: What do you need to apply? What does it take to get in? How many schools should you apply to? When will you hear? etc. Panelists will include several graduate chairs and current graduate students.

Organizer:
Ruth Hass, University of Hawaii

Panelists:
Ruth Haas, University of Hawaii
David Futer Temple University
Garth Isaak, Lehigh University
Richard McGehee, University of Minnesota

Sponsor: Committee on Undergraduates

Social Event

Mathematicians Advancing Inclusion in Science (MAIS) Reception

4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom A

Come learn about MAIS, get involved with MAIS, and share your ideas.

Organizers:
Jesús A. De Loera, U. of California, Davis
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College
Pamela Harris, Williams College

Social Event

Graduate Student Reception

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, MAA Suite

Graduate students are invited for some refreshments and to meet several of the invited speakers.

Organizers:
Edray Goins, Pomona University
Eric Eager, University of Wisconsin at La Crosse

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Graduate Students

Social Event

MAA-Spectra Reception

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon E

MAA President, Michael Dorff, hosts reception for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender mathematicians. All are welcome.

Social Event

NSA Networking Reception

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon C

The National Security Agency (NSA) Women in Mathematics Society is hosting a Networking Reception open to all! Come network with NSA mathematicians to learn about career and internship in opportunities in the field of mathematics at the NSA. We look forward to meeting you!

Organizers/Sponsors: NSA Women in Mathematics Society

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Environmental Mathematics (SIGMAA EM) Business Meeting, Reception, & Guest Lecture

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J

Organizer:
Benjamin Galluzo, Clarkson College

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA) Business Meeting & Reception

6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon K

Organizer:
Susan Crook, Loras College

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST) Business Meeting and Guest Lecture

Building Communities Around Joyful Mathematics Through Cup Stacking

Spencer Bowen, San Francisco State University

6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon D

Start with a row of cups. Cups jump onto each other to make larger stacks. One cup jumps one space, a stack of two cups jump two spaces, and so on. Stacks must jump a number of spaces equal to the number of cups in the stack. Can you get all your cups into a single stack? This cup jumping lesson was one that the American Institute of Mathematics partnered with the Santa Clara (CA) County Office of Education to develop at their elementary schools. The goal of the project is to promote Math Communities that create a culture of year-round enjoyable mathematical engagement and play. The Math Communities model brings together several previously established programs such as Math Teachers’ Circles and Math Festivals, as well as newly created initiatives to get students, teachers, and parents engaging with mathematics in many different formal and informal settings. We have started our efforts at Title 1 elementary schools in the county with high proportions of Spanish-speaking families. At the talk you’ll have a chance to problem solve through the cup jumping lesson and will be able to take away examples of activities that promote joyful mathematical learning for students and parents along with models for coordinated implementation of similar materials in classroom learning and teachers’ professional development time. You’ll leave with a replicable "stealable" tool, program, approach, or learning that is ready for others to adapt.

Organizer:
Jane Long, Stephen F. Austin State University

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Mathematics & Sports (Sports SIGMAA) Business Meeting & Guest Lecture

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

Contact:
Liz Bouzarth, Furman University

Social Event

Math Stitchers

8:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Bring any stitching or craft project (knitting/crochet/embroidery/etc.) and chat with other mathematical stitchers.

Organizer:
Mary Shepherd, Northwest Missouri State University


Friday, July 31

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Rooms 411, 412, 413

Pi Mu Epsilon student members who wish to represent their chapters as student speakers or official delegates should visit the PME website at http://pme-math.org/ for more information.

Please note: all student presenters are required to be registered for MAA MathFest.

Organizer:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Rooms 404, 405, and 410

The MAA Student Paper Sessions abstract portal is now live! Please click here to submit an abstract.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Prize Session

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom G & H

The session is organized by MAA Secretary James Sellers, University of Minnesota-Duluth, and is moderated by MAA President Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University.

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Lecture II

10:20 a.m. - 11:10 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Jordan Ellenberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Invited Paper Session

African American Women and the Mathematics of Flight

10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

The 2016 book “Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race” featured stories about African American women who worked for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from the 1930s through the 1960s. Several of these women were mathematicians: Katherine Johnson worked out the orbital mechanics of John Glenn’s orbit of the Earth in 1962; and Dr. Christine Darden revolutionized aerodynamics design to produce low-boom sonic effects in the 1970’s. Indeed, Katherine Johnson earned a BS in mathematics in 1937 and Dr. Christine Darden earned a MS in Mathematics in 1967. In this session, we will feature the mathematics of pioneers in flight such as Katherine Johnson Christine Darden; and we will discuss the history of African American women who have worked in the aeronautical industry.

Organizer:
Edray Goins, Pomona College

Contributed Paper Session

Modeling in Your Differential Equations Course – Just Do It!, Part A

10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom L

In differential equations, a pivotal STEM course, effort is given to doing modeling to motivate students and facilitate transferability to cognate areas. Faculty who do modeling in differential equations courses share their efforts. This session offers experiences, plans, and aspirations with specific, rich illustrations of modeling to enhance skills in both differential equations and its applications.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE (www.simiode.org) Director
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Janet Fierson, LaSalle University
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Sponsor: Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE)

Contributed Paper Session

Online Pedagogy of Upper Division Mathematics, Part A

10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

Much of the discussion of online mathematics courses has been focused on lower division courses that serve other disciplines or the general education curriculum. In this session, we will address pedagogical strategies for delivering upper division courses in an online setting. Included in the discussion will be topics related to course design, content delivery, student interaction, and assessment.

Organizers:
George H. Lytle, University of Montevallo
Cheryll C. Johnson, Asbury University

Contributed Paper Session

Effectively Utilizing Undergraduate Teaching Assistants, Part A

10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J

At both research and teaching institutions, instructors have the opportunity to make use of undergraduate teaching assistants in the mathematics classroom to enhance instruction. This session seeks to share evidence-based practices about the use and support of undergraduate TAs in the classroom.

Organizers
Carolyn Yackel, Mercer University
Emily Braley, Harvard University
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University

Sponsor: Committee for the Teaching of Undergraduate Mathematics (CTUM) and College Mathematics Instructor Development Source (CoMInDS)

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, and Gambling, Part A

10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encourage

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (Rec SIGMAA)

Contributed Paper Session

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education, Part A

10:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian P. Katz, Smith College
Shiv Smith Karunakaran, Michigan State University
Nicole Engelke Infante, West Virginia University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

Panel Session

A Program Review Revue

10:20 a.m. - 11:40 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

A Program Review Review, a musical skit written and directed by Annalisa Crannell, will be performed by members and friends of the MAA committee on program review. The skit will draw attention to the fears, pitfalls, and opportunities that come with conducting a program review. Following the brief skit, members of the committee will serve as a panel to answer audience questions raised by the skit or from personal/professional experiences.

Organizer:
Rick Gillman, Valparaiso University

Panelists:
Lyn Miller, Slippery Rock University
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin and Marshall

Sponsor: The MAA Committee on Program Review

Poster Session

Undergraduate Student Poster Session

10:20 a.m. - 11:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon F

This session features research done by undergraduate students. Appropriate content includes, but is not limited to, a new result, a new proof of a known result, a new mathematical model, an innovative solution to a Putnam problem, or a method of solution to an applied problem. Projects that are currently "in progress", but leading towards one of these outcomes are also welcome. Purely expository material is not appropriate for this session.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Sponsor: Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUS)

Workshop

Developing Excellence in Academic Leadership Through Case Studies

10:20 a.m. - 11:40 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

The keys to being a successful student of mathematics -- preparation, study, practice, perseverance -- are essential to becoming a more effective and successful leader in academic administration. Department chairs and other leaders are invited to participate in this hands-on workshop to discuss case studies based on the leadership challenges faced by faculty and departments.

Organizers:
Edward Aboufadel, Grand Valley State University
Jonathan Hodge, Grand Valley State University

Minicourse

Minicourse 1. Linear Algebra in Computer Graphics and Data Science, Part B

10:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

This minicourse will cover linear algebra applications from computer graphics and data science. The depth will range from those that require little mathematical background (submatrices, matrix arithmetic) to more sophisticated topics (eigenanalysis, singular value). The minicourse will also provide webpages that enable experimentation without any coding and also provide codes that serve as a template for student exploration.

Organizer:
Tim Chartier, Davidson College

Sponsor: MAA CUPM

Minicourse

Minicourse 8. The Who, Why, and How of Undergraduate Research in Math, Part B

10:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

This minicourse will be an open discussion on undergraduate research in mathematics. From why and how to do it, to where to find, or come up with, good accessible problems, we will discuss our experiences and come up with a plan to be implemented the following academic year. This will be a hand on, active learning workshop and attendants will be expected to work.

Organizer:
Alicia Prieto Langarica, Youngstown State University
Cindy Wyels, California State University-Channel Islands

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Minicourse

Minicourse 11. Teaching Math Courses for Elementary Education Majors, Part B

10:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

Teaching mathematics courses for future elementary teachers is an exciting and challenging experience. Different schools offer a variety of hours and courses. How do you decide what should be in the course at your institution? This session will discuss techniques and topics that should be a part of such a course or courses. We will talk about publications that help guide you as you teach this course and methods that have been found to be successful in such a course. All are welcome in the minicourse and having access to your current course descriptions will be helpful, if you have them.

Organizer:
Judith Covington, Northwestern State University

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

Increasing the Rate of Change: The Impact of Broadening the Visibility of Mathematicians of Color

11:20 a.m. - 12:10 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Candice Price, University of San Diego

African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Latinx-- who have historically comprised a minority of the U.S. population-- are growing in size and influence. Currently, while constituting 30 percent of the U.S. population, by 2050, these groups together will account for greater than 40 percent of the U.S. population. Yet, these groups are largely underrepresented in the STEM fields---especially mathematics. Lately, there has been a growing discussion around the issue of the lack of diversity in STEM and its effect on the growth and innovation needed in these disciplines to solve the most complex issues humanity faces. I believe one reason people of color are underrepresented in STEM is that students of color rarely see themselves reflected in the STEM community. My service mission is to support those underrepresented in STEM by creating and supporting programs that increase visibility and amplify the voices of women and people of color in STEM while creating networks and community in STEM to provide opportunities to share resources. In this talk, I will describe my path in mathematics through an exploration of my involvement in programs that are working towards broadening the visibility of mathematicians of color.

Invited Address

SIAM-MAA Joint Invited Lecture

Data Skills for the Mathematical Sciences

1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Chad Topaz, Williams College

Data acquisition, exploration, analysis, modeling, and visualization have become central to the mathematical sciences. The importance of data has been emphasized at the highest levels of our profession, including in reports from the National Academy of Sciences, the Mathematical Association of America, the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, and the American Statistical Association. However, the fusion of data skills with core parts of the mathematical sciences curriculum has yet to be fully realized. This talk discusses the importance of data skills and presents pathways for incorporating them into undergraduate mathematical sciences education. One pathway is through the classroom. I will present selected examples from courses in linear algebra, differential equations, mathematical modeling, and even calculus, including signal processing, dynamical systems, abstract art, and an interactive activity on multivariable quadrature motivated by environmental science. A second pathway is through undergraduate research. I will showcase data-intensive student projects that apply mathematics to collective motion in biology and to social justice. Finally, I will mention resources for instructors who themselves want to grow their data skills.

Invited Paper Session

Eigenvalues and Graphs

1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Graphs can be used to represent the relations (edges) between objects (vertices), and so play an important role both in theoretical as well as applied settings. One important tool in understanding graphs is through the use of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices associated with graphs; this is sometimes known as spectral graph theory. There are many possible matrices that can be explored and each one brings its own strengths and weaknesses into understanding graphs. This session will bring together a variety of viewpoints of how eigenvalues and graphs are connected.

Organizer:
Steve Butler, Iowa State University

Spectral and Combinatorial Properties of the Associahedron Graph

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Sebi Cioaba, University of Delaware

The Exponential Distance Matrix

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Kate Lorenzen, Iowa State University

Fiedler Vectors with Unbalanced Sign Patterns

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Sooyeong Kim, University of Manitoba

Quantum Walks on Graphs

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Sabrina Lato, University of Waterloo

A Meta-Conjecture in Spectral Extremal Graph Theory

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Michael Tait, Villanova University

Invited Paper Session

Women in Mathematics: Math in Action

1:30 p.m. - 3:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

Mathematics is in action within so many exciting non-mathematical settings, spanning from classical historical and cutting edge interplays between mathematics and physics, biology, and other sciences, to beautiful applications of mathematics to games, art, social justice, economics, and climate change, to name a few. Topics with possibly unexpected applications outside of mathematics include complexity classes, Ramsey colorings, tropical numbers, topology, hyperbolic surfaces, geodesics, and more.

In this session, we showcase current research done by women (and their students) of mathematics and statistics applied to a variety of non-mathematical settings. This session is sponsored by the AWM, and is organized by the AWM Committee on MathFest.

Organizer:
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Emelie Kenney, Siena College
Sarah Wolff, Denison University

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

Math, Medicine and Mysteries

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Ami Radunskaya, Pomona College

TBA

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Lynne Seymour, University of Georgia

Identifying Geohazards with Mathematics and Statistics

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Celestine Woodruff, James Madison University

Crochet Topology

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Moira Chas, Stony Brook University

Contributed Paper Session

Modeling in Your Differential Equations Course – Just Do It!, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom L

In differential equations, a pivotal STEM course, effort is given to doing modeling to motivate students and facilitate transferability to cognate areas. Faculty who do modeling in differential equations courses share their efforts. This session offers experiences, plans, and aspirations with specific, rich illustrations of modeling to enhance skills in both differential equations and its applications.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE (www.simiode.org) Director
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Janet Fierson, LaSalle University
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Sponsor: Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE)

Contributed Paper Session

Online Pedagogy of Upper Division Mathematics, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

Much of the discussion of online mathematics courses has been focused on lower division courses that serve other disciplines or the general education curriculum. In this session, we will address pedagogical strategies for delivering upper division courses in an online setting. Included in the discussion will be topics related to course design, content delivery, student interaction, and assessment.

Organizers:
George H. Lytle, University of Montevallo
Cheryll C. Johnson, Asbury University

Contributed Paper Session

Effectively Utilizing Undergraduate Teaching Assistants, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J

At both research and teaching institutions, instructors have the opportunity to make use of undergraduate teaching assistants in the mathematics classroom to enhance instruction. This session seeks to share evidence-based practices about the use and support of undergraduate TAs in the classroom.

Organizers
Carolyn Yackel, Mercer University
Emily Braley, Harvard University
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University

Sponsor: Committee for the Teaching of Undergraduate Mathematics (CTUM) and College Mathematics Instructor Development Source (CoMInDS)

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, and Gambling, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encourage

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (Rec SIGMAA)

Contributed Paper Session

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian P. Katz, Smith College
Shiv Smith Karunakaran, Michigan State University
Nicole Engelke Infante, West Virginia University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

Panel Session

Storytelling for Enhanced Mathematics Teaching: A Discussion With Mathematician Authors

1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

How do you teach effectively so your students feel engaged, not overwhelmed? The best math teaching, like the best math writing, artfully balances technical details with an engaging narrative to make the math accessible and compelling. In this panel of mathematicians who write books for general-interest readers, you’ll learn strategies for turning math lessons in calculus and beyond into story. Come for stories. Leave with ideas for teaching.

Organizers:
Susan D'Agostino, Johns Hopkins University
Daniel Taber, Oxford University Press

Panelists:
Susan D'Agostino, Johns Hopkins University
Ben Orlin, Black Dog & Leventhal
Steven Strogatz, Cornell University
Talithia Williams, Harvey Mudd College

Workshop

An Inquiry-Oriented Approach to Determinants: New Materials from the IOLA Project

1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

In this workshop, we will introduce tasks from a new unit in the Inquiry-Oriented Linear Algebra (IOLA) project. These materials build on existing units to support intuitive conceptions of determinant from a situated context and generalize such experiences toward more formal notions of determinant. Participants will explore the new materials as students might and discuss instructional strategies for implementing Inquiry-Oriented materials.

Organizers:
David Plaxco, Clayton State University
Megan Wawro, Virginia Tech
Michelle Zandieh, Arizona State University
Christine Andrews-Larson, Florida State University

Minicourse

Minicourse 4. Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Hands-on, practical art puzzles inspire the mathematics of projective geometry \(-\) the study of properties invariant under projective transformations. We explore activities in perspective art or photography that motivate concepts in projective geometry, including Desargues' Theorem and numerical projective invariants. Activities in problem solving and proof are suitable for a sophomore-level proofs class. No artistic experience is required.

Organizers:
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin and Marshall College
Fumiko Futamura, Southwestern University

Sponsor: SIGMAA Arts

Minicourse

Minicourse 5. Introduction to WeBWorK: An Open-Source Alternative to Generate and Deliver Online Homework Problems, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

Participants will learn to utilize the opensource online homework system WeBWorK. Adopted by over 1200 institutions, WeBWorK includes an extensive, curated library of over 35,000 exercises encompassing the collegiate curriculum. Subjects include College Algebra, Calculus, ODEs, Linear Algebra, Statistics, and Introduction to Proofs. Participants will learn how to utilize WeBWorK in their classrooms and to edit WeBWorK exercises.

Organizers:
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education

Minicourse

Minicourse 6. Jumpstarting your Scholarship Program, Part B

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

The two days of this course will have different foci. One will feature an overview of the NSF, consisting of an introduction to programs that support both research in the mathematical sciences and innovations in learning and teaching, together with tips for writing strong proposals. During the second session, we will discuss numerous aspects of a scholarship program, including how to find possible problems and collaborators, presenting your research, writing up your results, and getting your work published. We will also spend time setting goals and priorities for the upcoming year or two and make a plan for how to achieve those goals. Both days will provide plenty of time for questions and discussion.

Organizers:
Alissa Crans, Loyala Marymount University
Karen Keene, National Science Foundation, DUE
Michelle Manes, National Science Foundation, DMS

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Undergraduate Student Activity

We Begin with a Deck of Cards …

1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom A & B

Robert Vallin, Lamar University

We all know there are lots of fun games and activities that come from a standard deck of cards. As they say during 3 a.m. infomercials, “But wait, there’s more!!” A deck is also the gateway to a myriad of different ideas in mathematics. In this event we start with some of the more straightforward ideas like counting and then move on to some other fun things that we can play with. If you have a deck of cards, bring it along (there will be a limited supply available at the session).

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Rooms 411, 412, 413

Pi Mu Epsilon student members who wish to represent their chapters as student speakers or official delegates should visit the PME website at http://pme-math.org/ for more information.

Please note: all student presenters are required to be registered for MAA MathFest.

Organizer:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Student Paper Sessions

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Rooms 404, 405, and 410

The MAA Student Paper Sessions abstract portal is now live! Please click here to submit an abstract.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Other Mathematical Session

Alder Award Session

2:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G & H

The MAA established the Henry L. Alder Award for Distinguished Teaching by a Beginning College or University Mathematics Faculty Member to honor beginning college or university faculty members whose teaching has been extraordinarily successful and whose effectiveness in teaching undergraduate mathematics is shown to have influence beyond their own classrooms. Each year, at most three college or university teachers are honored with this national award. The awardees are invited to make a presentation in this session. The session is moderated by MAA President Michael Dorff.

Panel Session

The Modern Mathematics Major in the Data Science Era

3:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

Every year new programs in data science and statistics are being added at the undergraduate level. So where does this leave the traditional mathematics major? Panelists will discuss how mathematics programs have adapted to the demand for data science and statistics, speaking to institutional change, personal development, and the MAA view on statistics and data science within undergraduate programs in mathematics.

Organizer:
Judith E. Canner, California State University, Monterey Bay

Panelists:
Patti Frazer Lock, St. Lawrence University
Ryan Botts, Point Loma University
Tim Chartier, Davidson College

Sponsors:
SIGMAA on Statistics Education
ASA-MAA Joint Committee on Undergraduate Statistics Education

Poster Session

MAA Contributed Poster Sessions, Session II

3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon F

The MAA is pleased to continue with the MAA Contributed Poster Session (CPS) at MathFest 2020 in Philadelphia, PA. The overwhelming consensus among organizers and participants is that poster sessions provide an excellent opportunity to share participants’ work, to network with attendees who share interests with the presenters, and to learn from the attendees. Our goal is to leverage the poster session format to increase engagement between presenters and their audience. We will rotate the poster categories throughout the meeting, each rotation will last 45 minutes, and the number of rotations will depend on the number of accepted posters. The MAA will provide corkboards or trifolds for the posters – you just need to bring your poster.

Submitting an abstract for the poster session in the areas of mathematics, pedagogy, and undergraduate mathematics curriculum is no different than submitting an abstract for the contributed paper session. To submit an abstract for MAA MathFest 2020 go to www.maa.org/mathfest/abstracts and follow the instructions found there. The deadline for submission of abstracts is April 30, 2020. Early submissions are encouraged. When you submit your abstract, you will be asked to place it in one of the following categories:

  • Assessment
  • History and Philosophy of Mathematics
  • Interdisciplinary Topics in Mathematics
  • Mathematics and Technology
  • Mentoring
  • Modeling and Applications
  • Outreach
  • Teaching and Learning Advanced Mathematics
  • Teaching and Learning Calculus
  • Teaching and Learning Developmental Mathematics
  • Teaching and Learning Introductory Mathematics
  • Teaching and Learning Other Mathematics
  • Algebra
  • Analysis
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Geometr
  • Graph Theory
  • Linear Algebra
  • Logic and Foundations
  • Number Theory
  • Probability and Statistics
  • Other than the above

Please consult this year's Call for Posters for more information on the sessions in general, and what to expect for submitting and preparing presentations.

Poster Session

PosterFest 2020: Scholarship by Early Career Mathematicians

3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon F

This poster session and networking event provides an informal opportunity for early career mathematicians to present and discuss their scholarly activities (such as: expository work, preliminary reports, scholarship of teaching and learning, and research reports). Nontenured faculty and graduate students are encouraged to apply. Undergraduate submissions will not be accepted. Questions regarding this session should be sent to the organizers.

Organizers:
Holly Attenborough, University of Wisconsin-Plattevlile
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University

Sponsor: The MAA Committee on Early Career Mathematicians (ECM)

Workshop

Desmos-Based Assignments in Precalculus and Calculus

3:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m., Pennsyvlania Convention Center, Room 202A

This session presents assignments that utilize the Desmos graphing calculator to create a product that accomplishes a task, following constructionist learning principles. Examples include applied sinusoidal regression; tangent lines in Cartesian, parametric, and polar coordinates; and volumes by rotation. A sample grading rubric will be provided. Participants are encouraged to complete these assignments during the workshop and share ideas.

Organizer:
Zachary Beamer, Piedmont Virginia Community College

Minicourse

Minicourse 3. Getting Started with Mastery Grading, Part A

3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4/p>

In a mastery grading system, students’ grades are based on their ability to demonstrate mastery of a well-defined list of learning objectives. We will describe the key components of a mastery grading system, highlighting how such a system supports the student learning cycle. Participants will have the opportunity to begin to craft mastery grading components for their own courses.

Organizer:
Rachel Weir, Allegheny College

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Minicourse

Minicourse 10. Experiences in Teaching Introductory Data Science to Math Majors, Part A

3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Participants in this minicourse will be exposed to topics covered in the introductory data science course at Winona State University. A three-prong pedagogical approach is used in teaching this course (i.e., hands-on activity -> non-programming software -> writing code). Participants of this minicourse will be asked to engage in all three components of this pedagogy using a variety of tasks that can easily be implemented into existing courses.

Organizer:
Christopher J. Malone, Winona State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA Stat Ed and ASA-MAA Joint Committee

Minicourse

Minicourse 12. Liberal Arts Math, Quantitative Literacy, College Algebra/Precalculus: A Novel Hybrid Curriculum, Part A

3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

We discuss a course for students who must fulfill a mathematics requirement but are not planning to take calculus or more advanced subjects. This novel approach combines desirable features from standard offerings for such students. Difference equation models with evident significance lead to standard precalculus topics such as linear and exponential functions, while emphasizing modeling methods. Pedagogy (e.g., technology) will also be discussed.

Organizers:
Dan Kalman, American University
Sacha Forgoston, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Invited Address

NAM David Harold Blackwell Lecture

2020 Census, Lagrange's Identity, and Apportionment of the U.S. House of Representatives

4:00 p.m. - 4:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Tommy Wright, U.S. Bureau of the Census

Given the impracticality of a pure democracy, the U.S. Constitution (1787) calls for a representative form of democracy where the people elect persons to represent them for governing. Each state gets a number of representatives in the U.S. House of Representatives "...according to their respective numbers..." as recorded in a census of the nation to be conducted every ten years starting in 1790. We make use of an elementary result known as Lagrange's Identity to provide a bridge between an insightful motivation and an elementary derivation of the method of equal proportions. The method of equal proportions is the current method for apportioning the 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives among the 50 states, following each decennial census. We highlight why the numbers from the census matter and affect our condition and behavior. We also present some historical comments about the first two methods of apportionment, as well as the method that preceded equal proportions.

Panel Session

Culturally-Rich Strategies for Advancing Mathematics Learning

4:30 p.m. - 5:50 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

This session will explore initiatives that seek to broaden access to and engagement in mathematics in formal and informal settings through culturally-rich, assets-based methods, focused on African American, Indigenous, or Latinx populations. The session will begin with a short panel presentation to describe culturally-rich initiatives for advancing mathematics learning, their related outcomes, successes and challenges. After a question and answer period, participants will share their individual interests in broadening STEM participation and will brainstorm and discuss strategies to incorporate and enhance these models and facilitate future collaborations. Some of the projects described are grant-funded, including National Science Foundation initiatives.

Organizers:
Odesma Dalrymple, University of San Diego
Yaoran Li, University of San Diego
Perla Myers, University of San Diego

Panelists:
Shelly M. Jones, Associate Professor, Central Connecticut State University
Lou Matthews, Founder, InspireMath
Candice Price, Smith College
Joi Spencer, Professor and Associate Dean, University of San Diego

Workshop

The Definition of a Mathematician

4:30 p.m. - 5:50 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

In this interactive workshop, participants will reflect on what we think it means to be a mathematician, who is seen or counted as a mathematician, what causes this, and how that affects our communities of learning, teaching and research in mathematics. If you would like to explore those issues, come and find out! Be prepared to discuss some potentially difficult topics.

Organizers:
Rosalie Bélanger-Rioux, McGill University
Sara Rezvi, The University of Illinois at Chicago

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (Rec SIGMAA) Business Meeting, Reception, and Guest Lecture

Gears, Graphs, and Archimedes

Gary Gordon, Lafayette College

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

This talk connects a children’s plastic gear toy with two Archimedean solids, the cubeoctahedron and the icosadodechedron. Workable arrangements of gears correspond to planar bipartite graphs, and the duals of these graphs give the connection to the solids. Euler’s famous polyhedron formula plays an important role here. The talk will include lots of very small plastic pieces not intended for very small children.

Organizer:
Robert Vallin, Lamar University

Other Mathematical Session

SCUDEM Gathering and Information Session

5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 403

SCUDEM-SIMIODE Challenge Using Differential Equations Modeling Gathering of colleagues interested in host site coordinator issues, team registration, coaching teams, etc. to learn about SCUDEM V 2020 event to be held on 14 November 2020. See www.simiode.org/scudem for complete details

Organizer:Brian Winkel, Director of SIMIODE

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Statistics Education (SIGMAA STAT-ED) Business Meeting

6:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon J

Organizer:
Judith Canner, California State University, Monterey Bay

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics (SIGMAA TAHSM) Business Meeting, Reception, & Guest Lecture

A Few of My Favorite Numbers

Stephen Kokoska, Bloomsburg University

6:00 p.m. - 7:15 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon L

Certain numbers are just naturally mysterious and appealing. For example, \(π\), \(e\), or maybe even \(√3/2\). But there are some numbers that seem to appear often enough in our work to strike a nerve and to create a lasting impression. This presentation will include a discussion of some of my favorite numbers, why they are fascinating, and some interesting examples and facts involving these numbers.

Organizer:
Chuck Garner, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Undergraduate Research (UR SIGMAA) Reception & Guest Lecture

Using Restorative Practices to Build Research Communities

Pamela Harris, Williams College

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon D

I have collaborated with over 50 undergraduate students on mathematical research and their work has resulted in over 20 research publications and an additional eight writing contributions to the profession. In this talk, I detail the specifics that made these collaborations so fruitful (spoiler alert: it was not the math). In particular, I will share ways we implemented restorative practices in the research process (building honest and sincere relationships focused on individual responsibility and shared accountability) and how these practices greatly helped to advance the mathematical work.

Organizer:
Allison Henrich, Seattle University

Other Mathematical Session

Documentary Film about the Duluth REU

7:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

Curious about Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) programs? Join us for a public showing of a film about the Duluth REU, the longest running REU in the nation. This documentary highlights the life and career of Joe Gallian, the daily operations of the REU, and interviews with many participants.

Organizer:
Shah Roshan Zamir, University of Nebraska Lincoln

Social Event

MAA Ice Cream Social

8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom A & B

Besides cake and ice cream, we will recognize all students who gave talks in the MAA Student Paper Sessions, and award prizes for the best of them. All are invited.


Saturday, August 1

Invited Paper Session

Supporting Student Success in Introductory Statistics through Evidence-Based Practices

8:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Each academic year, over 600,000 students enroll in college introductory statistics courses, according to the 2015 CBMS survey. Enrollments have more than doubled since 2000. Although many of the new statistics students have sufficient mathematics fluency to succeed, many others struggle with algebra, numeric operations, and logic, leading to poor course outcomes. In this session, speakers will present evidence-based results from projects about supporting students enrolled in introductory statistics courses. Projects include identifying students in need of extra assistance with mathematical fluency and/or statistical content, and then implementing one of several ways to provide that assistance, including instructor-led sessions, computer-based support, and undergraduate-led supplemental instruction. Session speakers work at a variety of institutions, small and large, public and private. Though the context for the presentations is Introductory Statistics, the innovations and pedagogical practices presented are adaptable to any introductory college level mathematics course and have broader implications for supporting student success in first-year college level mathematics and statistics.

Organizers:
Judith Canner, California State Monterey Bay
Adam Molnar, Oklahoma State University

Sponsors:
SIGMAA on Statistics Education (SIGMAA StatEd)
ASA-MAA Joint Committee on Undergraduate Statistics Education

Computer-based Learning plus Tutoring in Essentials of Statistics

8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
JayneAnn Harder, Oral Roberts University

Corequisite Statistics Courses for Equitable Support of Underprepared Students

8:30 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
Alana Unfried, California State University, Monterey Bay

Implementation and Continuation Issues for Supporting Underprepared Introductory Statistics Students Using an Assessment and Peer Tutoring Intervention Program

9:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.
M. Leigh Lunsford, Longwood University
Phillip L. Poplin, Longwood University

Large Scale Peer-Assisted Tutoring, Corequisites, and Other Math Support for Introductory Statistics

9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Adam Molnar, Oklahoma State University

Discussion

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

Invited Paper Session

Open & Accessible Problems for Undergraduate Research

8:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

More and more mathematics faculty members around the country are conducting math research with undergraduates. As the benefits to students and faculty of engaging in undergraduate research become apparent, the number of professors with an interest in doing undergraduate research grows. Indeed, many of us would like to begin a research project with students, but we may be unsure of how to choose problems that are accessible for students. The aim of this session is to have experienced undergraduate research mentors share open and accessible problems from a variety of mathematical fields that can be used to generate ideas for new undergraduate research projects.

Organizer:
Allison Henrich, Seattle University
Debra Hydorn, University of Mary Washington
Laramie Paxton, Marian University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Undergraduate Research (UR SIGMAA)

Accessible, and Interesting Research Problems in Combinatorics for Undergraduates

8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
Oscar Vega, California State University, Fresno

Patterns in Trees

8:30 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
Lara Pudwell, Valparaiso University

Getting Started in Sports Analytics Research

9:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.
Amanda Harsy, Lewis University

Data-intensive Undergraduate Research Projects

9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Kumer Das, Lamar University

Computer Driven Questions and Theorems and in Geometry

10:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.
Moira Chas, Stony Brook University

Knotted Undergraduate Research

10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Colin Adams, Williams College

Contributed Paper Session

Computational Investigation in Undergraduate Mathematics

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom J

Computational tools help students explore mathematical concepts, formulate questions, and test conjectures. This session will highlight strategies for incorporating computational mathematics into the undergraduate math curriculum. We encourage talks on computational investigation of mathematical topics, the interplay of computation and proof, computation in the development of mathematical maturity, and assessment of computational learning goals.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom A

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Timothy D. Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA)

Contributed Paper Session

Interplay Between Digital Mathematics Learning and Effective Pedagogical Tools

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 411 & 412

In this session we intend to showcase some of the best practices in undergraduate mathematics instruction that are enhanced by digital tools and effective pedagogical practices. Talks will include links for getting started with a platform, sharing of materials for use, and both evidence and rationale that pedagogy was enhanced. Speakers are encouraged to address the integration of open educational resources, e.g., open (free) books with randomized question libraries that have nominal costs. Moreover, the presenters will explore the effectiveness of electronic assessments, such as formative versus summative, while including (but not limiting to) dynamic and/or adaptive forms. Additionally, participants will compare their platform of choice to other available platforms, along with suitable pedagogical tools (e.g., blended learning, active learning, project-based learning).

Organizers:
Benjamin Atchison, Framingham State University
Ariel Cintron-Arias, East Tennessee State University
Michael Miner, American Public University System
Sharon Mosgrove, Western Governors University
Ryan Nivens, East Tennessee State University
Douglas Scheib, Western Governors University
Philip Smith, East Tennessee State University
Carolyn Yackel, Mercer University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education (CTiME)

Contributed Paper Session

Mastery Grading

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon I

Mastery grading includes assessment techniques such as standards-based grading, specifications grading, and mastery-based testing. In these, a student’s grade is directly tied to their mastery of specific objectives rather than collecting points or partial credit. We invite scholarly presentations that give practical implementation advice (particularly in large or coordinated courses) and provide evidence of the efficacy of mastery grading.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

Contributed Paper Session

Encouraging Effective Teaching Innovation

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon L

This session will consist of presentations of demonstrably effective and innovative classroom techniques that address the reasoning behind, design, and implementation of resources or activities. This may include whole course techniques (not necessarily original to the presenter) or drop-in activities to bolster student learning and reflection in any course. Materials will be shared after the session at http://mathfest2020.davidfailing.com/

Organizers:
Susan Crook, Loras College
David Failing, Lewis University
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Russ Goodman, Central College
Abigail Bishop, Iona College
Erin Moss, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Contributed Paper Session

Applications of Technology-Driven Representations to Deepen Student Mathematical Knowledge

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 414 & 415

Considering multiple representations of a mathematics concept represents a powerful approach for deepening student knowledge. Demands for incorporating these representations into instruction emerge as technology becomes increasingly available. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of technology-driven representations for the teaching and learning of mathematics.

Organizers:
Aaron Trocki, Elon University
Jim Beuerle, Elon University
Todd Lee, Elon University
Jan Mays, Elon University

Contributed Paper Session

More than Math: Resilience, Growth Mindset, and Transferable Skills

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom K

Alongside teaching mathematics, many instructors implement learning experiences oriented toward their students’ personal development. Such an approach enables student success in our classes and beyond by fostering particularly effective attitudes, mindsets, and transferable “soft skills” that rank among those most highly desired by employers. Talks focus on how presenters engage students in fostering effective mindsets and in developing transferable skills.

Organizers:
Sean Droms, Lebanon Valley College
Sara Malec, Hood College
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Prayat Poudel, Centre College

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and Sports

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom B

The expanding availability of play-by-play statistics and video-based spatial data have led to innovative mathematical research with impacts on strategy and player evaluation. Other areas of interest include ranking methods, predictive models, physics-based analysis, etc. Research presentations, expository talks, and pedagogical contributions are all welcome. Projects involving undergraduate students are particularly encouraged for submission.

Organizers:
Liz Bouzarth, Furman University
Diana Cheng, Towson University
John David, Virginia Military Institute

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematics and Sports (Sports SIGMAA)

Panel Session

Best Practices in Mathematics for the Health Sciences

8:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

Students preparing for careers in the Health Sciences need quantitative skills that are somewhat different from both traditional college algebra and more recently developed quantitative reasoning courses. Recently, the MAA partnered with several other groups to form a task force to address this discrepancy. This session will focus on the work of that group, as well as best practices in curriculum and pedagogy for math for the Health Sciences.

Organizers:
Kira Hamman, Penn State Mont Alto
Daniel Ozimek, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

Panelists:
Andrew Baxter, Penn State University Park
Glenn Murphy, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Joan Zoellner, Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

Poster Session

PIC Math Showcase

8:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom E & F

PIC Math prepares mathematical sciences students for industrial careers by engaging them in research problems that come directly from industry. In this session students who participated in PIC Math will give talks and poster presentations about their research, and mathematicians in industry will talk about what it is like to work in industry and what students need to do to succeed.

  • 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m: Eight students talks at 15-minute intervals
  • 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.: Two mathematicians from industry speak in 30-minute intervals
  • 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Break
  • 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.: PIC Math student poster session (Grand Ballroom F)

Sponsors: PIC Math is an MAA program that is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF grant DMS-1722275) and the National Security Agency (NSA)

Workshop

Multiple Representations, Connections and Technology

8:00 a.m. - 9:20 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

Engage in real-world data collection, create dynamic mathematical representations to connect and build mathematical understanding. This session focuses on geometry and algebra content using ClassPad.net (FREE dynamic math web-based software). Create tables, graphs, constructions, calculations, record observations, and make conjectures, all in one place. This is a hands-on math with technology workshop - bring your mobile devices!

Organizer:
Karen M. Greenhaus, Drexel University

Invited Address

Christine Darden Lecture

The Road to 2002 Sonic Boom Demonstrator

9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Christine Darden, Retired from NASA Langley Research Center

I will open the lecture with some explanation of my childhood, my elementary school education in a segregated school that taught no higher mathematics classes than Algebra and Plane Geometry, and my experience in Plane Geometry during 11th grade at a boarding school that also taught no higher math class. During that 11th grade experience, I fell in love with the class and decided that I wanted to be a mathematician. After high school graduation, I enrolled in a college where all of the students who were planning to become mathematicians had taken Calculus and Trigonometry in high school. I will then share how 5 years after graduating with a B.S. Degree in Math and Physics Education and after having taught high school mathematics & physics for 2 years and having earned a master’s degree in Applied Mathematics, I was hired by NASA as a Data Analyst (Computer) where I worked for 5 years supporting Engineers in the Apollo Program.The year was now 1972 and the United States has just cancelled its Commercial Supersonic Transport Program because of the noise of the sonic boom. I was transferred to a section created to work on the softening of the sonic boom of a supersonic airplane. I will then explain the process of the sonic boom work that resulted in a demonstration of the softened sonic boom.

Panel Session

NSF S-STEM Initiatives with Mathematics Connections

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202B

The National Science Foundation’s Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program (S-STEM) Program funds initiatives that seek to increase the number of low-income academically talented STEM students entering the workforce or graduate programs in STEM; improve their education; and generate knowledge to advance understanding of how interventions or evidence-based curricular/co-curricular activities affect the success, retention, transfer, academic/career pathways, and graduation of low-income students in STEM. This session will feature S-STEM projects led by members of SIG S-STEM, a newly-created support group for PIs of S-STEM grants with mathematics connections. We will share successes, lessons learned, and future plans, and will answer questions from future PIs considering or planning to submit an S-STEM or other NSF grant proposal to support students.

Organizers:
Perla Myers, University of San Diego
Oscar Vega, California State University, Fresno

Panelists:
Rebekah Dupont, Augsburg University
Yu-Ju Kuo, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Ileana Vasu, Holyoke Community College
Jane Friedman, University of San Diego
Karen Keene, National Science Foundation

Minicourse

Minicourse 3. Getting Started with Mastery Grading, Part B

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

In a mastery grading system, students’ grades are based on their ability to demonstrate mastery of a well-defined list of learning objectives. We will describe the key components of a mastery grading system, highlighting how such a system supports the student learning cycle. Participants will have the opportunity to begin to craft mastery grading components for their own courses.

Organizer:
Rachel Weir, Allegheny College

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Minicourse

Minicourse 10. Experiences in Teaching Introductory Data Science to Math Majors, Part B

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Participants in this minicourse will be exposed to topics covered in the introductory data science course at Winona State University. A three-prong pedagogical approach is used in teaching this course (i.e., hands-on activity -> non-programming software -> writing code). Participants of this minicourse will be asked to engage in all three components of this pedagogy using a variety of tasks that can easily be implemented into existing courses.

Organizer:
Christopher J. Malone, Winona State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA Stat Ed and ASA-MAA Joint Committee

Minicourse

Minicourse 12. Liberal Arts Math, Quantitative Literacy, College Algebra/Precalculus: A Novel Hybrid Curriculum, Part B

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

We discuss a course for students who must fulfill a mathematics requirement but are not planning to take calculus or more advanced subjects. This novel approach combines desirable features from standard offerings for such students. Difference equation models with evident significance lead to standard precalculus topics such as linear and exponential functions, while emphasizing modeling methods. Pedagogy (e.g., technology) will also be discussed.

Organizers:
Dan Kalman, American University
Sacha Forgoston, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Workshop

Justice for All: Women, Mathematics, and Social Justice

9:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

Recent work by many exceptional women has brought the powerful tools of mathematics to bear on problems of social justice. In this hands-on workshop, women involved in math for social justice will introduce participants to ideas for including these topics in their classroom or scholarship practices. The primary target audience is women in the mathematical sciences, but everyone, including students, is welcome.

Organizers:
Sarah Wolff, Denison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Emelie Kenney, Siena College
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

Sponsor: AWM Committee on MathFest

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Lecture III

10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Jordan Ellenberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Other Mathematical Session

Julia Robinson Math Festival

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 1&2

Come play with mathematics! A Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival is a non-competitive after-school event for pre-college students. (But adults enjoy them as well.) We will meet in Franklin 1&2 between 12 and 2 PM. Tables will be set up, with a game, puzzle, or problem set at each table, and also a facilitator who is familiar with the activity. You can choose your activity, stay as long as you want, and move to another activity whenever you like. Activities are low-threshold, high-ceiling. They often begin with simple tasks requiring no background, but develop into sophisticated mathematical investigations. We would like to help you organize a Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival in your own locality. Our support services are offered free of charge. For more information, see www.jrmf.org.

Organizer:
Mark Saul, Executive Director of the Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival (JRMF)

Other Mathematical Session

USA Problem Solving Competition

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 401 & 402

This event is the finals of The Problem Solving Competition. Universities and colleges that participate monthly on their own campuses by holding problem solving contests are invited to send a contestant. Each contestant will be required to solve a series of mathematical problems. Based upon the outcome, a champion along with second through sixth place winners will be named.

Organizer:
Richard Neal, The American Society for Mathematics (ASFM)

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

Lecture Title and Abstract TBA

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Po-Shen Loh, Carnegie Melon University

Poster Session

MAA Contributed Poster Sessions, Session III

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon F

The MAA is pleased to continue with the MAA Contributed Poster Session (CPS) at MathFest 2020 in Philadelphia, PA. The overwhelming consensus among organizers and participants is that poster sessions provide an excellent opportunity to share participants’ work, to network with attendees who share interests with the presenters, and to learn from the attendees. Our goal is to leverage the poster session format to increase engagement between presenters and their audience. We will rotate the poster categories throughout the meeting, each rotation will last 45 minutes, and the number of rotations will depend on the number of accepted posters. The MAA will provide corkboards or trifolds for the posters – you just need to bring your poster.

Submitting an abstract for the poster session in the areas of mathematics, pedagogy, and undergraduate mathematics curriculum is no different than submitting an abstract for the contributed paper session. To submit an abstract for MAA MathFest 2020 go to www.maa.org/mathfest/abstracts and follow the instructions found there. The deadline for submission of abstracts is April 30, 2020. Early submissions are encouraged. When you submit your abstract, you will be asked to place it in one of the following categories:

  • Assessment
  • History and Philosophy of Mathematics
  • Interdisciplinary Topics in Mathematics
  • Mathematics and Technology
  • Mentoring
  • Modeling and Applications
  • Outreach
  • Teaching and Learning Advanced Mathematics
  • Teaching and Learning Calculus
  • Teaching and Learning Developmental Mathematics
  • Teaching and Learning Introductory Mathematics
  • Teaching and Learning Other Mathematics
  • Algebra
  • Analysis
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Geometr
  • Graph Theory
  • Linear Algebra
  • Logic and Foundations
  • Number Theory
  • Probability and Statistics
  • Other than the above

Please consult this year's Call for Posters for more information on the sessions in general, and what to expect for submitting and preparing presentations.

Invited Paper Session

Mathematics for Data Science

1:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom C

Analyzing complex data requires both a strong theoretical foundation and applied data science skills to ensure that data is used responsibly and ethically. However, many definitions of data science focus only on the intersection of statistics and computer science, without any focus on what mathematical skills are needed to be a successful data scientist. As the mathematics community continues to grapple with the field of data science, educators are producing recommendations on data science curriculum and how to best prepare the future data scientist workforce. Therefore, it is crucial to consider the role of mathematics in the data science curriculum, and how to broaden access to data science career paths for mathematics students.

This session features leaders in the intersection of mathematics and data science who will discuss the role of mathematics in data science, in many different forms. This session is formatted as talks from six experts in the applications of mathematics in data science. The session will appeal to any MathFest attendees interested in strengthening skills needed for data science, understanding the applications of mathematics to data science, or pathways into data science careers.

Organizer:
Alana Unfried, California State Monterey Bay

The Convergence of Multiple Traditional Disciplines Catalyze the Field of Data Science

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Talitha Washington, Howard University
Erick Jones, University of Texas at Arlington

When Life is Linear: Data Science and Linear Algebra

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Tim Chartier, Davidson College

Machine Learning Analysis for Fulfillment of Per Diem Nurse Shifts

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Semere Habtemicael, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Preparing for Data Science: A Math Educator and Industry Scientist Perspective

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Elin Farnell, Amazon Web Services

Underneath the Hood: Teaching the Theory and Practice of Optimization for Data Science

3:00 p.m.- 3:20 p.m.
Emily Evans, Brigham Young University

The Necessity of a Math for Data Science Course

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Chris Malone, Winona State University
Todd Iverson, Winona State University
Brant Deppa, Winona State University
Lee Windsperger, Winona State University
Aaron Wangberg, Winona State University

Invited Paper Session

Current Research in Math Biology

1:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom D

Mathematical biology investigates biological phenomena using mathematical techniques. This encourages collaborations between mathematicians and biologists, requiring mathematicians to learn relevant biology before applying mathematical techniques to the problem. Research in this area illustrates how biology and mathematics can work together to advance both fields. In this session, we showcase current research in mathematical biology, with an undergraduate audience in mind.

With a wide variety of biological applications and mathematical techniques that can be applied to investigate biological research questions, our session will demonstrate the breadth of this research area for undergraduates and other interested researchers.

Organizer:
Rebecca A. Everett, Haverford College
Nicholas A. Battista, The College of New Jersey

Integrating Disease and Ecosystem Ecology using Mathematical Models

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Rebecca Everett, Haverford College

Social Organization and its Effects on Disease Spread

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Shelby Wilson, University of Maryland

Non-Exponentially Distributed Infection and Treatment Stages in a VectorBorne Disease Model

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Miranda Teboh Ewungkem, Lehigh University

Exploring the Predictive Abilities of a Mathematical Oncology Model

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Jana Gevertz, The College of New Jersey

Using Mutual Information to Select Optimal Data Collection Times for Tumor Model Calibration

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Allison Lewis, Lafayette College

A Comprehensive Approach Toward Reproductive Phenotype Discovery

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Erica Graham, Bryn Mawr College

Contributed Paper Session

Improving Success in College Mathematics Courses

1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom I

Many faculty in higher education have experienced their students struggle with mathematics skills that should have been mastered earlier. In this session, we will consider how to address the challenges that faculty face in teaching mathematics to an under-prepared audience, share strategies for strengthening skills and fostering interest in mathematics, and explore solutions for improving success in college mathematics courses. In particular, we will explore the innovations in the co-requisite model in developmental mathematics education, and share class and programmatic structures utilized to support STEM Pathways.

Organizers:
Daniel A. Daly, Southeast Missouri State University
Haohao Wang, Southeast Missouri State University
Mary M. Legner, Riverside City College
Gregory D. Foley, Ohio University
Katherine J. Mawhinney, Appalachian State University
Katrina Palmer, Appalachian State University
Melissa Reid, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College

Workshop

Quantitative Reasoning in Nursing Practice: A Framework and Resources for Creating Engaging Tasks

1:00 p..m. - 2:20 p.m., Pennsylvania Convention Center, Room 202A

A national task force seeking to improve quantitative education practices for nurses has advocated for integrating the complexities of nursing practice into mathematics instruction. Consistent with these efforts and recent recommendations from an interdisciplinary convening of leaders, this workshop will engage participants in authentic nursing tasks that can be modified for traditional and online Quantitative Reasoning courses for all learners.

Organizers:
Daniel Ozimek, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Glenn Murphy, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Gayle Watson, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Joan Zoellner, The Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

Minicourse

Minicourse 2. Teaching Introductory Statistics: Focus on Concepts and Data, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

This minicourse provides hands-on activities, practical advice, and assessment strategies for teaching introductory statistics based on the American Statistical Association’s recommendations. These recommendations call for emphasizing statistical thinking and conceptual understanding, implementing active learning with interactive software, using real data from genuine studies, and including assessments that promote student learning.

Organizers:
Allan Rossman, Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo
Beth Chance, Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Minicourse

Minicourse 7. Game Theoretic Modeling for Math Majors, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

This minicourse introduces some game theoretic tools (utility functions, strategic games of complete and incomplete information, and coalition games) and their application to economic, political, and biological scenarios. Along the way, participants will engage in games (perhaps winning some money or other prizes!) and discover some ways to incorporate activities and content into their own courses in game theory, modeling, or calculus.

Organizers:
David Housman, Goshen College
Richard Gillman, Valparaiso University

Minicourse

Minicourse 9. Mathematics for Social Justice, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

How can mathematics faculty foster critical thinking and empower students to analyze social justice issues? This session provides examples of applications of mathematics and statistics to real-world issues, such as racial profiling, environmental justice, and more. Participants will be able to incorporate examples and projects into a variety of courses and approach developing their own; beginners and experts are welcome.

Organizers:
Lily Khadjavi, Loyola Marymount University
Maria Mercedes Franco, Queensborough Community College (CUNY)

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Business Meeting

1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m., Philadelphia Convention Center, Room 202B

The meeting is organized by MAA Secretary James Sellers, University of Minnesota-Duluth, and is chaired by MAA President Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University

Other Mathematical Session

Read the Masters Session: Cauchy’s Calcul Infinitésimal

1:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon K

Augustin-Louis Cauchy (1789-1857) is well known for having promoted the notion of limit as a foundation for analytic concepts like continuity and the derivative through his lectures to students at the École Polytechnique in Paris in the 1810s and 1820s. These lecture notes were published in 1823, and a full English translation has just appeared, granting readers of English greater access to the work. At this event, a brief introductory talk about Cauchy’s legacy will precede an open reading session of a portion of these lecture notes (in English translation) by attendees in small groups, followed by a general discussion. No experience with the history of mathematics is required.

Organizers:
Erik Tou, University of Washington Tacoma
Daniel Otero, Xavier University
Lawrence D'Antonio, Ramapo College
Robert Bradley, Adelphi University
Amy Shell-Gellasch, Eastern Michigan University

Sponsors:
Euler Society
ORESME
SIGMAA on the History of Mathematics (HoM SIGMAA)
ARITHMOS
TRIUMPHS

Invited Address

Martin Gardner Lecture

Surprising Discoveries by Three Amateur Mathematicians

2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon G&H

Doris Schattschneider, Professor Emerita of Mathematics, Moravian College

It is amazing how intense curiosity and ingenuity can propel persons with little or no higher mathematical training to investigate mathematical problems and make surprising discoveries. Dutch graphic artist M.C. Escher (1898-1972), a failure at school mathematics, found answers to the question “Characterize shapes that will tile the plane in such a way that every tile is surrounded in the same manner.” American homemaker Marjorie Rice (1923-2017), not allowed any math beyond a high school general math course, found new answers to the question “Characterize convex pentagons that can tile the plane.” And Dutch sculptor Rinus Roelofs (b. 1954), with an undergraduate degree in applied mathematics and a degree from AKI School of Arts, discovered a new infinite family of uniform polyhedra through sculptural exploration. This lecture will give glimpses of how these three each asked and answered mathematical questions in their own unique way.

Other Mathematical Session

Backgammon

3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Room 401& 402

Organizer:
Art Benjamin, Harvey Mudd College

 

Year: 
2020

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