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Minicourses

1. Linear Algebra in Computer Graphics and Data Science

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3
Part B: Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Description

This minicourse will cover linear algebra applications from computer graphics and data science. The depth will range from those that require little mathematical background (submatrices, matrix arithmetic) to more sophisticated topics (eigenanalysis, singular value). The minicourse will also provide webpages that enable experimentation without any coding and also provide codes that serve as a template for student exploration.

Organizer:
Tim Chartier, Davidson College

Sponsor: MAA CUPM

 

2. Teaching Introductory Statistics: Focus on Concepts and Data

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4
Part B: Saturday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. -3:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

Description

This minicourse provides hands-on activities, practical advice, and assessment strategies for teaching introductory statistics based on the American Statistical Association’s recommendations. These recommendations call for emphasizing statistical thinking and conceptual understanding, implementing active learning with interactive software, using real data from genuine studies, and including assessments that promote student learning.

Organizers:
Allan Rossman, Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo
Beth Chance, Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

 

3. Getting Started with Mastery Grading

Part A: Friday, July 31, 3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4
Part B: Saturday, August 1, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

Description

In a mastery grading system, students’ grades are based on their ability to demonstrate mastery of a well-defined list of learning objectives. We will describe the key components of a mastery grading system, highlighting how such a system supports the student learning cycle. Participants will have the opportunity to begin to craft mastery grading components for their own courses.

Organizer:
Rachel Weir, Allegheny College

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

 

4. Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Description

Hands-on, practical art puzzles inspire the mathematics of projective geometry \(-\) the study of properties invariant under projective transformations. We explore activities in perspective art or photography that motivate concepts in projective geometry, including Desargues' Theorem and numerical projective invariants. Activities in problem solving and proof are suitable for a sophomore-level proofs class. No artistic experience is required.

Organizers:
Annalisa Crannell, Franklin and Marshall College
Fumiko Futamura, Southwestern University

Sponsor: SIGMAA Arts

 

5. Introduction to WeBWorK: An Open-Source Alternative to Generate and Deliver Online Homework Problems

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

Description

Participants will learn to utilize the opensource online homework system WeBWorK. Adopted by over 1200 institutions, WeBWorK includes an extensive, curated library of over 35,000 exercises encompassing the collegiate curriculum. Subjects include College Algebra, Calculus, ODEs, Linear Algebra, Statistics, and Introduction to Proofs. Participants will learn how to utilize WeBWorK in their classrooms and to edit WeBWorK exercises.

Organizers:
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Robin Cruz, College of Idaho

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education

 

6. Jumpstarting your Scholarship Program

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13
Part B: Friday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

Description

The two days of this course will have different foci. One will feature an overview of the NSF, consisting of an introduction to programs that support both research in the mathematical sciences and innovations in learning and teaching, together with tips for writing strong proposals. During the second session, we will discuss numerous aspects of a scholarship program, including how to find possible problems and collaborators, presenting your research, writing up your results, and getting your work published. We will also spend time setting goals and priorities for the upcoming year or two and make a plan for how to achieve those goals. Both days will provide plenty of time for questions and discussion.

Organizers:
Alissa Crans, Loyala Marymount University
Karen Keene, National Science Foundation, DUE
Michelle Manes, National Science Foundation, DMS

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

 

7. Game Theoretic Modeling for Math Majors

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3
Part B: Saturday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Description

This minicourse introduces some game theoretic tools (utility functions, strategic games of complete and incomplete information, and coalition games) and their application to economic, political, and biological scenarios. Along the way, participants will engage in games (perhaps winning some money or other prizes!) and discover some ways to incorporate activities and content into their own courses in game theory, modeling, or calculus.

Organizers:
David Housman, Goshen College
Richard Gillman, Valparaiso University

 

8. The Who, Why, and How of Undergraduate Research in Math

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4
Part B: Friday, July 31, 10:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 4

Description

This minicourse will be an open discussion on undergraduate research in mathematics. From why and how to do it, to where to find, or come up with, good accessible problems, we will discuss our experiences and come up with a plan to be implemented the following academic year. This will be a hand on, active learning workshop and attendants will be expected to work.

Organizer:
Alicia Prieto Langarica, Youngstown State University
Cindy Wyels, California State University-Channel Islands

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

 

9. Mathematics for Social Justice

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13
Part B: Saturday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

Description

How can mathematics faculty foster critical thinking and empower students to analyze social justice issues? This session provides examples of applications of mathematics and statistics to real-world issues, such as racial profiling, environmental justice, and more. Participants will be able to incorporate examples and projects into a variety of courses and approach developing their own; beginners and experts are welcome.

Organizers:
Lily Khadjavi, Loyola Marymount University
Maria Mercedes Franco, Queensborough Community College (CUNY)

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

 

10. Experiences in Teaching Introductory Data Science to Math Majors

Part A: Friday, July 31, 3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3
Part B: Saturday, August 1, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 3

Description

Participants in this minicourse will be exposed to topics covered in the introductory data science course at Winona State University. A three-prong pedagogical approach is used in teaching this course (i.e., hands-on activity -> non-programming software -> writing code). Participants of this minicourse will be asked to engage in all three components of this pedagogy using a variety of tasks that can easily be implemented into existing courses.

Organizer:
Christopher J. Malone, Winona State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA Stat Ed and ASA-MAA Joint Committee

 

11. Teaching Math Courses for Elementary Education Majors

Part A: Thursday, July 30, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13
Part B: Friday 10:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

Description

Teaching mathematics courses for future elementary teachers is an exciting and challenging experience. Different schools offer a variety of hours and courses. How do you decide what should be in the course at your institution? This session will discuss techniques and topics that should be a part of such a course or courses. We will talk about publications that help guide you as you teach this course and methods that have been found to be successful in such a course. All are welcome in the minicourse and having access to your current course descriptions will be helpful, if you have them.

Organizer:
Judith Covington, Northwestern State University

Sponsor: MAA Project NExT

 

12. Liberal Arts Math, Quantitative Literacy, College Algebra/Precalculus: A Novel Hybrid Curriculum

Part A: Friday, July 31, 3:40 p.m. - 5:40 p.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13
Part B: Saturday, August 1, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Franklin 13

Description

We discuss a course for students who must fulfill a mathematics requirement but are not planning to take calculus or more advanced subjects. This novel approach combines desirable features from standard offerings for such students. Difference equation models with evident significance lead to standard precalculus topics such as linear and exponential functions, while emphasizing modeling methods. Pedagogy (e.g., technology) will also be discussed.

Organizers:
Dan Kalman, American University
Sacha Forgoston, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

 

Year: 
2020

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