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Chronological Schedule 2021

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Please note: all sessions are listed in Mountain Daylight Time (MDT = UTC-6:00)

Wednesday, August 4

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Probability and the Geometry of the Laplacian and Other Operators, Lecture I

10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

Rodrigo Bañuelos, Purdue University

The classical isoperimetric property (inequality) states that among all figures of equal area, the circle has the smallest perimeter. Equivalently, among all figures of equal perimeter, the circle encloses the largest area. In the first of these two talks the speaker will explore this property and its elegant connections (and generalizations) to Brownian motion and eigenvalues of the Laplacian. The notion of "stability" in these inequalities will be addressed and open problems will be mentioned. Departing from this, the second talk explores the question in the title of M. Kac’s famous 1966 paper "Can one hear the shape of a drum?" in the context of the geometry of the fractional Laplacian. Equivalently, by observing the trajectories of certain stochastic processes known as stable processes.

These talks are both expository, designed for general audiences. While interconnected, they are largely independent of each other. These talks intent to illustrate G. Pólya's statement that "the isoperimetric theorem, deeply rooted in our experience and intuition so easy to conjecture, but not so easy to prove, is an inexhaustible source of inspiration” from his book "Mathematics and Plausible Thinking.”

Exhibit Hall

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Visit the MAA Virtual Exhibit Hall to learn about new products and interact with MAA MathFest sponsors and exhibitors.

Invited Address

AMS-MAA Joint Invited Lecture

Eigenvalues and Graphs

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Steven Butler, Iowa State University

One way to store information about a graph is by an array with entries indexed by pairs of vertices with each entry giving information about a relationship between the pair. The linear algebraist in us would say, ``let's change our names and instead of calling it an array, let us call it a matrix, which is an array with benefits''. Among these benefits are the eigenvalues and singular values of the matrix. The eigenvalues give information about the linear transformation to which the matrix corresponds, and this can capture some structural properties of the graph (often with just knowing a few of the extremal eigenvalues). This provides a way to obtain information about a graph with just a handful of parameters. We will explore several different possible matrices and look at some of the information that we can, and in some cases cannot, learn by studying the eigenvalues.

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry Based Learning and Teaching, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

The goal of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. Within this context, IBL methods exhibit great variety. Activities can take place in single class meetings and span entire curricula for students of any age. Students can be guided to re-invent mathematical concepts, to explore definitions and observe patterns, to justify core results, and to take the lead in asking questions. There is a growing body of evidence that IBL methods are effective and important for teaching mathematics and for fostering positive attitudes toward the subject. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of inquiry-based methods for teaching and learning. We especially invite presentations that include successful IBL activities or assignments, that support observations about student outcomes with evidence, or that could help instructors who are new to IBL try new methods.

Organizers:
Nathaniel Miller, University of Northern Colorado
Parker Glynn-Adey, University of Toronto
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Application of IBL in Teaching Advanced Math Classes

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Marina Tvalavadze, University of Toronto, Mississauga

An Active Learning Group Theory Textbook to Train Students to Think Mathematically

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Alessandra Pantano, University of California, Irvine

Facilitating Inquiry Through Student Problem Posing Routine and Assessments

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Emily Dennett, Columbus Academy
Chris Bolognese, Columbus Academy

Contributed Paper Session

Computational Investigation in Undergraduate Mathematics, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Computational tools help students explore mathematical concepts, formulate questions, and test conjectures. This session will highlight strategies for incorporating computational mathematics into the undergraduate math curriculum. We encourage talks on computational investigation of mathematical topics, the interplay of computation and proof, computation in the development of mathematical maturity, and assessment of computational learning goals.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

Computation to Build Mathematical Curiosity and Wonder

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Scott Zinzer, Aurora University

Students Utilizing Computational Tools to Enhance a New Online Course and the Resulting Inspiration for an Undergraduate Research Project

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Kristi Karber, University of Central Oklahoma

Set Theory and Logic: Leveraging Computing As a Mediating Tool for Learning

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Antonio Martinez, San Diego State University

Contributed Paper Session

Math in Action, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Mathematics is in action within many beautiful non-mathematical settings, spanning from interplays with the sciences, to unexpected applications to games, art, social justice, and economics, among others. This session invites presenters to share work in which mathematics is used in another field. We encourage joint presentations by teams or advisor-student pairs. This session is in conjunction with the IPS “Women In Math: Math In Action”

Organizers:
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Sarah Wolff, Denison University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Emelie Kenney, Siena College

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

Mathematical Measurement in Data Science

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Leslie Jones, University of Tampa

The Role of Applied Mathematics in Artificial Intelligence Solutions for Humanitarian Action

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Thomas Chen, Academy for Mathematics, Science, and Engineering

Surviving the Apocalypse and its Aftermath with Mathematics

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Grace Cook, Bloomfield College
Ted Zolue, Bloomfield College
Delvon Rowley Hayes, Bloomfield College
Olivia Mercado, Bloomfield College

Contributed Paper Session

Games in Math Circles, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

We will focus on games in math circles. Such games are fun to play but they also offer opportunities for participants to think deeply about optimal strategies and do meaningful computations. Computer simulations of games or the coding of a master player that the circle can compete against are possibilities. Some games are not what they seem as they can be nearly determined by the opening setup but seeing this involves some deep funstration.

Organizer:
Edward C. Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)

A Hodgepodge of non-Traditional Games

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Rodi Steinig, Talking Stick Math Circle

Giotto- A Joyus Word Puzzle

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Rosa Aristy, Bridges to Science

Games Galore

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Skona Brittain, Santa Barbara Math Ellipse

Contributed Paper Session

Rethinking Mathematics Placement, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

There is a need to reexamine mathematics placement policies and procedures, especially within the context of the pandemic. Many colleges and universities are doing away with measures like SAT/ACT. Studies show that placement exams introduce biases. Placing students accurately is crucial, as misplacement leads to long-term negative effects. Speakers in this session will share their experiences with placement processes.

Organizers:
Alexandria Theakston Musselman, University of Washington Bothell
Emily Gismervig, University of Washington Bothell
Nicole Hoover, University of Washington Bothell

The Development of a Mathematics Directed Self-Placement Process: Lessons Learned and Challenges Presented

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Alexandria Musselman, University of Washington Bothell
Emily Gismervig, University of Washington Bothell
Nicole Hoover, University of Washington Bothell

Math Placement As an Active Verb

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Michael Nathanson, Saint Mary's College California
Jim Sauerberg, Saint Mary's College California

Promoting Agency in Mathematics Placement through an Online "Buildup" Program

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Samuel Tunstall, Trinity University
Emma Ross, Trinity University

Contributed Paper Session

Alternative Assessments: Lessons from the Pandemic, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

The pandemic has forced us to rethink assessments of student learning. The past year has led to creative solutions, such as the use of mastery grading systems and various educational technologies. In this session, speakers will share their strategies, successes, and the challenges they faced in assessment during the COVID pandemic, and how these might be used in the future.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg University
Beste Gucler, U Mass Dartmouth
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University

Trusting Students: Assessment in the Pandemic

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Debra Borkovitz, Boston University

Pseudo-Ungraded Exams

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Mike Janssen, Dordt University

Ungrading: Assessment from Beyond Mastery Grading

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Anne Sinko, College of St. Benedict / St. John's University

Contributed Paper Session

Promoting Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

National data trends and professional mathematics organizations call on mathematicians to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice in our classes and our departmental cultures. This session invites talks that describe approaches to enabling success of diverse students, incorporating social justice into curriculum, and fostering resilience and effective mindsets in their students.

Organizers:
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Robin Cruz, The College of Idaho
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Prayat Poudel, Centre College

DEI Problems in Mathematics and Some Possible Responses

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Prayat Poudel, Centre College

(CANCELED) When Black Lives Matter Enters the Mathematics Class: What Would You Do?

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Nicholas Heyer, San Diego State University
Kaia Ralston, San Diego State University
Antonio Martinez, San Diego State University
Chris Rasmussen, San Diego State University

A New Mathematical Metric for Inclusive Excellence in Teaching Applied Before and During the COVID-19 Era

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Jeffrey Ludwig, University of California, Irvine

Contributed Paper Session

Creating Relevance in Introductory Mathematics Courses, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Many students graduate college having taken only one mathematics course. How can introductory mathematics courses inspire students to become mathematically literate? One approach is to replace traditional, computation-focused Quantitative Reasoning and College Algebra material that students often find unrelatable with content that better reflects students’ real-life experiences. We invite talks that describe successful class activities or projects; innovative course resources or uses of technology; or complete course or curriculum redesigns that focus on conveying the introductory mathematics content in a more authentic way.

Organizers:
Tracii Friedman, Colorado Mesa University
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University

Experiencing Mathematics as Relevant: Classroom-tested Stand-Alone Activities

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Alice Petillo, Marymount University

A Quantitative Reasoning Course Redesign

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Tracii Friedman, Colorado Mesa University

The Beautility of Math: A Mathematical Reasoning Course

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Jeneva Clark, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Jonathan Clark, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Undergraduate Student Paper Sessions

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUS)

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Please find the full schedule of talks and list of abstracts here.

Organizers:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University
Frank Patane, Samford University

Sponsor: Pi Mu Epsilon (PME)

American Mathematics Competitions Session

Journey to the IMO and EGMO International Competitions

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Panel discussion with International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) and Europeans Girls Mathematical Olympiad (EGMO) medalist and coaches. What went into the preparation and training for the Olympiads? What tips would you give future IMO/EGMO participants? Who are your math mentors? How has your experience in the IMO/EGMO impacted your student journey and life?

Organizer:
Po-Shen Loh, Carnegie Mellon University

Networking Session

SCUDEM - International Student Challenge Gathering and Information

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

SCUDEM - SIMIODE Challenge Using Differential Equations Modeling, a student challenge modeling opportunity with differential equations, will take place from 23 October - 15 November 2021. Teams of three students select one of three problems and produce a model and a ten-minute video. Join us to learn more. See https://www.simiode.org/scudem for details.

Organizer:
Brian Winkel, Director SIMIODE

Sponsor: SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Prize Session

World Premiere of “MAA Summer 2021 Award Winners”

12:00 p.m. - 12:30 p.m., MAA Pavilion, Virtual Exhibit Hall

This year the MAA Prize Winners will be celebrated over the course of MathFest. We invite everyone to join us and congratulate our prize winners from 2020 and 2021.

Join us in the Pavilion to watch the world premiere video celebrating the winners of MAA’s 2021 Summer Awards. MAA Awards highlight our values of community, inclusivity, communication, and teaching & learning. This is the first in a series of activities to celebrate and recognize the people that bring their wits, strength, and love to help the MAA community flourish.

Host:
Jenny Quinn, MAA President, University of Washington, Tacoma

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

Integer Programming for Kidney Exchange

1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

Sommer Gentry, United States Naval Academy

People who volunteer as living kidney donors are often incompatible with their intended recipients. Kidney paired donation matches one patient and his or her incompatible donor with another pair in the same situation for an exchange. We represent patient-donor pairs be the vertices of a directed graph G, with edges connecting pairs if the donor of the source is compatible with the recipient of the sink. To find the best kidney exchanges, we maximize the sum of edge weights on disjoint cycles. I will first review various exponential-sized and polynomial-sized integer programming formulations proposed for this problem, and give an overview of integer programming solution methods to suggest why some formulations are more tractable than others.

Because a maximum edge-weight matching might not have the maximum cardinality; there is a risk of an unpredictable trade-off between quality and quantity of paired donations. The number of paired donations is within a multiplicative factor of the maximum possible donations, where the factor depends on the edge weighting. We design an edge weighting of G which guarantees that every matching with maximum weight also has maximum cardinality, and also maximizes the number of transplants for an exceptional subset of recipients, while favoring immunologic concordance.

Invited Paper Session

Open and Accessible Areas in Computational Mathematics

1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Mathematics research employ modern computational tools (such as computer algebra systems and programming environments) to investigate mathematical concepts, formulate questions, perform mathematical experiments, gather numerical evidence, and test conjectures. Computational tools can help make certain areas of mathematics research accessible to students, providing points of entry where students can formulate and explore questions in number theory, algebra, topology, and more.

This session will highlight areas of mathematics where computational tools allow students to grapple with open questions. Talks will be aimed at a broad, non-expert audience. The use of computation for investigating mathematical topics, rather than computation employed for statistical analysis, is preferred. Discussion of connections between computational investigation and proof is encouraged.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

Patterns in Generalized Permutations

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Lara Pudwell, Valparaiso University

An Undergraduate Course in Computational Mathematics

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Matthew Richey, St. Olaf College

How Neuroscience Provides an Accessible Context for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Victor Barranca, Swarthmore College

Computing Hyperelliptic Invariants from Period Matrices

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Christelle Vincent, University of Vermont

Using Simulation to Investigate Distributions of Piercing Numbers

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Tia Sondjaja, New York University

Invited Paper Session

Surprising Discoveries by Amateur Mathematicians, Part A

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

This session will focus on sometimes overlooked non-professionals who have solved interesting mathematical problems or made significant contributions to mathematical knowledge. These persons had no formal education in higher mathematics and pursued mathematical investigations in their own way. Martin Gardner inspired such amateurs throughout his career. Indeed, he himself never completed a math course past high school, yet contributed new mathematical results, many of them published in award-winning MAA papers. From the 19th century and earlier, we will learn of the mathematical contributions of Benjamin Franklin, Mary Somerville, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Kirkman, Henry Dudeney, and Alicia Boole Stott. From the 20th century to the present, in addition to Gardner, we will learn of patent officer Harry Lindgren, artist George Odom, postal worker Robert Ammann, surgeon Jan Gullberg, artist Anthony Hill and others. On Saturday, the Martin Gardner Lecture will feature three other amateur mathematicians who made surprising discoveries: M.C. Escher, Marjorie Rice, and Rinus Roelofs.

Organizers:
Doris Schattschneider, Professor Emerita of Mathematics, Moravian College
Colm Mulcahy, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, Spelman College

Is Mathematics Too Serious to Be Left to Mathematicians?

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Donald Albers, Retired Director of Publications at the MAA
Peter Renz, Retired Editor (W. H. Freeman, Birkhaüser Boston, Academic Press)

Florence Nightingale’s Notes on Victorian Officials’ Misunderstanding of Basic Mathematical Calculations and Management of Data

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Noel-Ann Bradshaw, London Metropolitan University

The Reverend Thomas P. Kirkman: What Did He Do Besides Inventing the Fifteen Schoolgirls Problem?

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Ezra (Bud) Brown, Virginia Tech

Benjamin Franklin, 231 Years Later

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Paul C. Pasles, Villanova University

(RESCHEDULED) Henry Dudeney: Amateur Mathematician?

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Charles Ashbacher, Charles Ashbacher Technologies

Alicia Boole Stott in the Fourth Dimension

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Moira Chas, Stony Brook University

Questions and Wrapup

3:50 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Invited Paper Session

African American Women and the Mathematics of Flight

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

The 2016 book “Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race” featured stories about African American women who worked for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from the 1930s through the 1960s. Several of these women were mathematicians: Katherine Johnson worked out the orbital mechanics of John Glenn’s orbit of the Earth in 1962; and Dr. Christine Darden revolutionized aerodynamics design to produce low-boom sonic effects in the 1970’s. Indeed, Katherine Johnson earned a BS in mathematics in 1937 and Dr. Christine Darden earned a MS in Mathematics in 1967. In this session, we will feature the mathematics of pioneers in flight such as Katherine Johnson Christine Darden; and we will discuss the history of African American women who have worked in the aeronautical industry.

Organizer:
Edray Goins, Pomona College
Christine Darden, Retired from NASA Langley Research Center

Highlighting the Hidden Legacy of Eunice Gray Smith

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Ranthony A.C. Edmonds, Ohio State University

Women in NASA Aeronautics

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Michelle Ferebee, NASA Langley Research Center

Value of Applied Mathematics For Aviation Research

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Tasha R. Inniss, Spelman College

STEM Stars! The Celebrity of Women Role Models in the Aeronautical Industry

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Shelly M. Jones, Central Connecticut State University

The Mathematical Story of a "Hidden Figure", Katherine Johnson (August 26, 1918 - February 24, 2020)

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Talitha Washington, Clark Atlanta University and Atlanta University Center

Dorothy Hoover: The Journey of a Hidden Figure from Arkansas to NASA

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Kimberly S. Weems, North Carolina Central University

Contributed Paper Session

Inquiry Based Learning and Teaching, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

The goal of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities. Within this context, IBL methods exhibit great variety. Activities can take place in single class meetings and span entire curricula for students of any age. Students can be guided to re-invent mathematical concepts, to explore definitions and observe patterns, to justify core results, and to take the lead in asking questions. There is a growing body of evidence that IBL methods are effective and important for teaching mathematics and for fostering positive attitudes toward the subject. This session invites scholarly presentations on the use of inquiry-based methods for teaching and learning. We especially invite presentations that include successful IBL activities or assignments, that support observations about student outcomes with evidence, or that could help instructors who are new to IBL try new methods.

Organizers:
Nathaniel Miller, University of Northern Colorado
Parker Glynn-Adey, University of Toronto
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL SIGMAA)

Increasing Engagement and Building Community through Teams in a Remote Learning Environment

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Joshua Bowman, Pepperdine University

Exploring the Tangent Line

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Judit Kardos, The College of New Jersey

IBL in an Online Flipped Classroom Model for a Transition to Proofs Class

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Xavier Ramos Olive, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Inquiry-based Instructional Practices in Remote Settings

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Demet Yalman Ozen, Middle Tennessee State University
Amanda Lake Heath, Middle Tennessee State University
Jordan Eugene Kirby, Middle Tennessee State University
Sam Reed, Middle Tennessee State University
Sarah Bleiler-Baxter, Middle Tennessee State University

Using Inquiry Effectively in a High-Impact Virtual and Experiential Practice

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Carolyn Luna, University of Texas at San Antonio
Jonathan Brucks, University of Texas at San Antonio
Kimberly Massaro, University of Texas at San Antonio

Fractal Visualization for Undergraduates: A Project-based Approach to Generating Fractal Images in Python

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Joseph Barrera, Converse College

Visualization in a Linear Algebra course

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Matthew Haines, Augsburg University

Mastery-Based Grading across the Calculus Sequence

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Kevin Gerstle, Hillsdale College

Contributed Paper Session

Alternative Assessments: Lessons from the Pandemic, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

The pandemic has forced us to rethink assessments of student learning. The past year has led to creative solutions, such as the use of mastery grading systems and various educational technologies. In this session, speakers will share their strategies, successes, and the challenges they faced in assessment during the COVID pandemic, and how these might be used in the future.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg University
Beste Gucler, U Mass Dartmouth
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University

A First Attempt at Mastery Based Grading

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Jessie Hamm, Winthrop University

New Job, New Modalities, New Assessment: Lessons from my Dive into Mastery Grading

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Rachel Grotheer, Wofford College

A Pandemic First Attempt at Mastery/Specifications Grading for a Joint Precalculus and Calculus I Course

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Kristen Sellke, Saint Mary's University

Reconsidering Final Exams as Mastery Assignments

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Mona Mocanasu, Metropolitan State University Denver

Online Versus In-Person Delivery: Exploring the Effects of Mastery Grading in a Ge3ometry Course for Pre-Service Elementary Teachers

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Emily McMillon, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Shaking up the Culture: Eliminating High Stakes Tests in the Midst of a Pandemic

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Teresa Magnus, Rivier University

Do All The Things! (Using Mastery Grading in Online Calculus during a Pandemic)

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Cassie Williams, James Madison University

Lessons Learned During the Pandemic – The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Violeta Vasilevska, Utah Valley University

Assessing Participation in the Time of Black Squares

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Christopher Shaw, Columbia College Chicago

Contributed Paper Session

Promoting Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.

National data trends and professional mathematics organizations call on mathematicians to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice in our classes and our departmental cultures. This session invites talks that describe approaches to enabling success of diverse students, incorporating social justice into curriculum, and fostering resilience and effective mindsets in their students.

Organizers:
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Robin Cruz, The College of Idaho
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Prayat Poudel, Centre College

Engaging Middle School Students in Math and Science

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Robin Cruz, The College of Idaho

BAMM! Building a Virtual Mentorship Community with Math Masters’ Students

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
John Rock, Cal Poly Pomona
Kimberly Seashore, San Francisco State University
Nikita Campos, Cal Poly Pomona
Alvaro Cornejo, San Francisco State University

Creating a Diverse Workforce in Biomedical Data Science: Implementation and Impact of Best Practices

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Judith Canner, California State University, Monterey Bay

Two-tiered Summer Programs to Promote Equity and Inclusion

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Nadia Kennedy, New York City College of Technology, CUNY
Ariane Masuda, New York City College of Technology, CUNY
Armando Cosme, Science Skills Center High School, Brooklyn

The Math Alliance, Lessons from 15 years of Building a New American Community in the Mathematical and Statistical Sciences

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Terrence Blackman, Medgar Evers College
David Goldberg, Purdue University
Phil Kutzko, University of Iowa
Leslie McClure, Drexel University
William Vélez, University of Arizona

The Two Faces of Data and Algorithms

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Deborah Hughes-Hallett, University of Arizona / Harvard Kennedy School

Using Social Justice,Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion as Context for Probability

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Carrie Muir, Whatcom Community College

Contributed Paper Session

Creating Relevance in Introductory Mathematics Courses, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Many students graduate college having taken only one mathematics course. How can introductory mathematics courses inspire students to become mathematically literate? One approach is to replace traditional, computation-focused Quantitative Reasoning and College Algebra material that students often find unrelatable with content that better reflects students’ real-life experiences. We invite talks that describe successful class activities or projects; innovative course resources or uses of technology; or complete course or curriculum redesigns that focus on conveying the introductory mathematics content in a more authentic way.

Organizers:
Tracii Friedman, Colorado Mesa University
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University

Saving the World with Mathematical Modeling: An Introductory Course in Sustainability-Math

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Jacob Duncan, Winona State University

Suggestions for a Survey Course for Liberal Arts Students That Is Not Like "A Traditional Math Class"

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Brendan Sullivan, Emmanuel College

Enhance Students' Learning by Introducing Real Life Problems and Examples into Quantitative Reasoning Course

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Chamila Ranaweera, Southeast Technical College

Abstract Mathematics Can Be Relevant: I Used It to Paint My Bathroom!

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Erika Ward, Jacksonville University

Using the Card Game SET in a General Education Math Class

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Lydia Kennedy, Virginia Wesleyan University

Modeling Ebola Spread in Introductory Courses

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University

Math for Gen Ed: Car Loan Exercise

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Erin Williams, University of Central Oklahoma

Discussion Boards and a Math in Culture Assignment in a Mathematics General Education Course

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Holly Attenborough, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Minicourse

Game Theoretic Modeling for Math Majors, Part A

1:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

This minicourse introduces some game theoretic tools (uitlity functions, strategic games of complete and incomplete information, and coalition games) and their application to economic, political, and biological scenarios. Along the way, participants will engage in games (perhaps winning some money or other prizes!) and discover some ways to incorporate activities and content into their own courses in game theory, modeling, or calculus.

Organizers:
David Housman, Goshen College
Richard Gillman, Valparaiso University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Undergraduate Student Paper Sessions

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUS)

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Please find the full schedule of talks and list of abstracts here.

Organizers:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University
Frank Patane, Samford University

Sponsor: Pi Mu Epsilon (PME)

Other Mathematical Session

The WeBWorK Project Open Office Hour

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., in the MAA Pavilion (Exhibit Hall)

Let's celebrate 25 years of WeBWorK! Now with over 50,000 questions in the Open Problem Library from basic algebra up through linear algebra and differential equations and also other STEM areas including physics, chemistry, and engineering. Visit our exhibit to demo new WeBWorK features, get your questions about WeBWorK answered, and learn how you can get involved.

Organizers/Panelists
Monica VanDieren, Robert Morris University, The WeBWorK Project
Robin Cruz, University of Idaho, The WeBWorK Project
Marianna Bonanome, City Tech CUNY, The WeBWorK Project
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, The WeBWorK Project

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Quantitative Learning (SIGMAA QL) Business Meeting

2:30 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.

Organizer:
Samual Tunstall, Trinity University

American Mathematics Competitions Session

MAA AMC Curriculum Inspirations Session 1

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Experience dynamic problem-solving with AMC problems and through exercises. James Tanton introduces Curriculum Inspiration strategies and applies them to AMC problems.

Organizer:
James Tanton, MAA Mathematician at Large

Networking Session

NSF Funding Opportunities in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) offers multiple grant programs that promote research, innovations in learning and teaching and/or infrastructural support in the mathematical sciences. Program Officers from the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) will provide an overview of several programs that welcome submissions from the mathematical sciences community, discuss the NSF review process, and provide tips on effective proposal preparation. Participants will also have the opportunity to explore specific DUE programs through breakout sessions that will include ample time for discussion and Q&A.

Organizers:
Michael Ferrara, John Haddock, Sandra Richardson, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation

Invited Address

Pi Mu Epsilon J. Sutherland Frame Lecture

Arithmetic and Digits

3:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.

Florian Luca, University of the Witwatersrand

In our recent paper in the Monthly (October, 2019) with Pante Stănică, we looked at perfect squares which arise when concatenating two consecutive positive integers like 183184 = 4282 with the smaller number to the left, or 98029801 = 99012 with the larger number to the left. My talk will present variations on this topic with the aim of providing the audience with examples of numbers which are both arithmetically interesting (like perfect squares) while their digital representations obey some regular patterns. The examples will not be limited to perfect squares, but will also include other old friends like Fibonacci numbers and palindromes.

Contributed Paper Session

Rethinking Mathematics Placement, Part B

3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

There is a need to reexamine mathematics placement policies and procedures, especially within the context of the pandemic. Many colleges and universities are doing away with measures like SAT/ACT. Studies show that placement exams introduce biases. Placing students accurately is crucial, as misplacement leads to long-term negative effects. Speakers in this session will share their experiences with placement processes.

Organizers:
Alexandria Theakston Musselman, University of Washington Bothell
Emily Gismervig, University of Washington Bothell
Nicole Hoover, University of Washington Bothell

Math Placement - A Calculus I Readiness Program

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Mei Chen, The Citadel

Success in Calculus : Investigating the Relationships between SATScores, High School GPA, Undergraduate Precaclulus Grade and Calculus Grade

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Michelle Rabideau, University of Hartford
Andrew Starnes, Lirio, LLC

The Effect of Math Placement and Multiple Precalculus Pathways on Calculus I Outcomes

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Zaher Kmail, University of Washington Tacoma
Ander Erickson, University of Washington Tacoma
Bonnie Becker, University of Washington Tacoma

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (BIO SIGMAA) Business Meeting

3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Organizer:
Hannah Highlander, University of Portland

American Mathematics Competitions Session

Mathematical Olympiad Awards Ceremony

4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

We are thrilled to announce one more stop on your AMC journey at MAA MathFest: The Mathematical Olympiads Award Ceremony (MOAC)! On the evening of Wednesday, August 4, we’re inviting some of the brightest young minds to the stage to be recognized for their achievements in mathematics. Register today to cheer on your peers and celebrate what’s possible for the next generation of mathematicians across the world.

To welcome awardees and attendees, we’re hosting one of America’s most renowned mathematicians, Dr. Eric Lander, to the MOAC stage. Dr. Lander is the President’s Science Advisor and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), and his impressive career began just like yours...with a love of math. He will deliver a live message at the event that you won’t want to miss!


Thursday, August 5

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Section Officers Meeting

8:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.

Check MAA Connect for location - this meeting has moved outside of MAA MathFest 2021.

Invited Address

MAA Retiring Presidential Address

Who Are the Frodos and Celies of Mathematics?

10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

Michael Dorff, MAA Past President, Brigham Young University

Who should be in the modern-day Hall of Fame of Mathematicians? For me, it is not a collection of people whom you would find in a traditional list of mathematicians. Instead, they are the mathematicians who have impacted people's lives whether in small quiet ways or through breakthrough actions. Find out who some of these people are and why I consider them to be the modern Superheroes of Mathematics.

Exhibit Hall

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Visit the MAA Virtual Exhibit Hall to learn about new products and interact with MAA MathFest sponsors and exhibitors.

Invited Address

Chan Stanek Lecture for Students

Stories About How I Got Where I Am Today

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Erica Flapan, Editor in Chief of the Notices of AMS

I will talk about my life, from elementary school to becoming the Editor in Chief of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society. While my history is quite different from that of most mathematicians, I hope that hearing stories about my trials and tribulations can inspire young mathematicians facing their own trials and tribulations to keep at it as I did and become mathematicians who can then tell their own stories to the next generation of young mathematicians. This talk will include a little bit of knot theory, a little bit of spatial graph theory, a little bit of chemistry, and a little bit of humor. But mostly, it will just be stories.

Contributed Paper Session

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, CSU Long Beach
Nicole Infante, West Virginia University
Shiv Karunakaran, Michigan State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

Collaborative Practices in Virtual Group Work on Dynamic Geometry Tasks

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Younggon Bae, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Modeling As Methodology and GeoGebra As a Resource in the Study of Differential Equations

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Celina Abar, Pontifical Catholic University Sâo Paulo - Brazil
Amabile Jeovana Mesquita, Pontifical Catholic University Sâo Paulo - Brazil

Building Epidemic Awareness through Mathematical Modelling

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Annela Kelly, Regis College

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, and Gambling, Part A

11:00 a.m. -11:55 a.m.

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encouraged.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (SIGMAA REC)

Multigraphs and Crossword Puzzle Grid Designs

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Ben Cote, Western Oregon University
Leanne Merrill, Western Oregon University

Lights Out on Graph Products over the Ring of Integers Modulo k

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Travis Peters, College of Saint Benedict & Saint John's University
Ryan Munter, Saint John's University

Bounds on Solvable Snake Cube Puzzle

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Anthony Bosman, Andrews University
Adrian Negrea, Andrews University

Contributed Paper Session

Cross Curricular Applications for Pure Mathematics Courses

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

The material in pure mathematics can be used in almost every discipline—linguistics, politics, history, chemistry, anthropology, social justice, just to name a few. The presentations in this session will focus on a variety of well-constructed, cross-curricular activities and projects that can be used in undergraduate pure mathematics courses, such as discrete mathematics, abstract algebra, number theory, among others.

Organizers:
Elizabeth Donovan, Murray State University
Lucas Hoots, Centre College
Lesley Wiglesworth, Centre College

An Introduction To Dialectic Mathematics

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Vladimir Minev, Retired

Renewing Elementary Linear Algebra Courses with Activities in Data Science

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Donna Beers, Simmons University

The Importance and Impact of Mathematics and Cryptography in Cybersecurity

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Joan E. DeBello, St. John's University
Erald Troja, St. John's University

Contributed Paper Session

Modeling in Your Differential Equations Course - Just Do It, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Differential equations is a natural course for modeling. More faculty use modeling. From the literature, workshops, talks, personal exchanges, etc. colleagues hear how others use modeling and decide to Just Do It! We propose this session as a way to share experiences with specific illustrations of how modeling is used to motivate students while working with them to enhance their skills in both differential equations and its applications.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Janet Fierson, LaSalle University
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Sponsor: SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations

A Prelude to Competitive Modeling

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Satyanand Singh, New York City College of Technology, CUNY

Modeling in Differential Equations in Remote and Hybrid Courses

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Active Learning: Perspective of Student Turned Researcher and Teacher

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Elizabeth Carlson, University of Victoria

Contributed Paper Session

Using Inquiry and Collaboration in Faculty Professional Development during the Pandemic and Beyond, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Presenters will actively engage participants in scholarly conversations about using inquiry and collaboration in virtual and in-person professional development for college mathematics educators. Presenters are encouraged to share successes, challenges, and opportunities. Facilitators may introduce a specific activity or share best practices to: create community, ensure equity, foster engagement, or build specific skills, knowledge, or beliefs about teaching.

Organizers:
Nina White, University of Michigan
Patrick Rault, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy
Laura Watkins, Glendale Community College
Christine Von Renesse, Westfield State University

Sponsor: Communities for Mathematics Inquiry in Teaching Network & the MAA Committee on Professional Development

Using Virtual TACTivities to Model Active Learning

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Angie Hodge-Zickerman, Northern Arizona University
Cindy York, Northern Illinois University
Eric Stade, University of Colorado - Boulder

Professional Development for Graduate Student Instructors: Using Modeling and Collaborative Inquiry to Expand Beliefs

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Babette M. Benken, Caliifornia State University, Long Beach

Designing Asynchronous Sessions for New Instructor Professional Development

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Hanna Bennett, University of Michigan
Gavin LaRose, University of Michigan
Angela Kubena, University of Michigan
Paul Kessenich, University of Michigan
Beth Wolf, University of Michigan
Scott Schneider, University of Michigan

Contributed Paper Session

Alternative Assessments: Lessons from the Pandemic, Part C

11:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.

The pandemic has forced us to rethink assessments of student learning. The past year has led to creative solutions, such as the use of mastery grading systems and various educational technologies. In this session, speakers will share their strategies, successes, and the challenges they faced in assessment during the COVID pandemic, and how these might be used in the future.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg University
Beste Gucler, U Mass Dartmouth
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University

Implicit Assumptions in Assessment

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Brian (BK) Katz, California State University Long Beach

Assessment, Proficiency, and Compassion

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Benjamin Braun, University of Kentucky

Contributed Paper Session

Insights into Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning from the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

From the use of data to understand injustice or COVID-19, to the development of asynchronous materials, individuals teaching quantitative literacy and reasoning courses have adapted in multiple ways over the past two years. Presenters in this session will share problems and innovations from the past two years that provide new ways of thinking about teaching for quantitative literacy and reasoning.

Organizers:
Luke Tunstall, Trinity University
Mark Branson, Stevenson University
Catherine Crockett, Point Loma Nazarene University
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Quantitative Learning (SIGMAA QL)

Seeing the Pandemic through a Spreadsheet

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Enrique Acosta Jaramillo, Mathematics Consortium Working Group
Deborah Hughes Hallett, University of Arizona/Harvard Kennedy School

COVID-19, Statistical Literacy and the Diabolical Denominator

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Milo Schield, Augsburg University

Putting COVID-19 Data to Good Use: Projects For Undergraduate Research

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
John Sieben, Texas Lutheran University
Reza Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University

Contributed Paper Session

Ethnomathematics: Culture Meets Mathematics in the Classroom, Part A

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

As more institutions strive to present multicultural offerings, courses dedicated to or incorporating Ethnomathematics - the study of mathematical aspects of the cultures of different peoples - are becoming more popular. This session features talks that present research that has been successful in attracting and involving students in Ethnomathematics. Ideas and innovations in Ethnomathematics for its use in teaching are welcome.

Organizers:
Ximena Catepillan, Millersville University of Pennsylvania
Janet Beery, University of Redlands
Cynthia Taylor, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Sponsor: SIGMAA on the History of Mathematics (HOM SIGMAA)

Sigma: Consideration of the Mathematical Aspect of “The Sum of Things” in an Ancient Greek Text of Rhetoric

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Ann von Mehren, University of Memphis

Mathematical Mysteries of Rapa Nui with Classroom Activities

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Cynthia Huffman, Pittsburg State University
Ximena Catepillan, Millersville University
Scott Thuong, Pittsburg State University

Symmetric Designs of Mirror Curves Inspired by African Sona

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Darrah Chavey, Beloit College

Poster Session

MAA Outreach Poster Session

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

The MAA Outreach Poster Session will provide the opportunity for program directors to share the amazing work they have done with students from elementary school through higher education. We welcome posters from all kinds of projects: math teacher circles, math summer camps, mentoring programs, research experiences and more! This session serves as a way to not only highlight the great work of community members working on outreach projects but to also offer ideas to others who struggle with engaging their students. Have an idea for a math program? Come learn from experienced outreach program directors! Also learn about funding opportunities through MAA grants programs.

Organizers:
Rachelle DeCoste, Tensor Women and Mathematics
Candice Price, Tensor SUMMA
Nancy Neudauer, Dolciani Mathematics Enrichment Grant

Breathing Life (Sciences) Into Mathematics Courses

Jillian Miller, Roane State Community College
Alys Hugo, Everett Community College

When Black Lives Matter Enters the Mathematics Class: What Would You Do?

Nicholas Heyer, San Diego State University
Kaia Ralston, San Diego State University
Antonio Martinez, San Diego State University
Chris Rasmussen, San Diego State University

COMP: Graduate Students Building and Promoting Community and Inclusivity during a Pandemic

John Peca-Medlin, UC Irvine
Kelly Isham, UC Irvine
Jesse Kreger, UC Irvine

STEM Model-Eliciting Activities with Baltimore County Public School Students

Jean Ciscell, Towson University
Wendy Gibson, Towson University / Baltimore County Public Schools
Diana Cheng, Towson University
Kimberly Corum, Towson University
Michael Krach, Towson University
Rachel Mulvaney, Baltimore County Public Schools

Mathematics Outreach with (Instant) Insanity!

Holly Attenborough, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Chris Frayer, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Establishing the Mathematicians of Color Alliance at Texas

Richard Wong, University of Texas at Austin
Jonathan Johnson, University of Texas at Austin
Casandra Monroe, University of Texas at Austin
Luis Torres, University of Texas at Austin
Hannah Turner, University of Texas at Austin
Nicolas Reyes, University of Texas at Austin

Math Tutoring Buddies Program

Sayonita Ghosh Hajra, Sacramento State
Abigail Higgins, Sacramento State

A Virtual Sonia Kovalevsky Day

Jessie Hamm, Winthrop University

Encouraging Undergraduate Research in Mathematical Modelling in Epidemiology

Lillian Demarais, Indian River State College
Duane Chin-Quee, Indian River State College

Girls Talk Math - Engaging Girls through Math Media

Francesca Bernardi, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Katrina Morgan, Northwestern University
Samantha Moore, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Marissa C. Ashner, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dixie Tensor Scholar Program (DTSP) - Maryam Day

Bhuvaneswari Sambandham, Dixie State University
Jie Liu, Dixie State University
Clare Banks, Dixie State University
Vinodh Chellamuthu, Dixie State University

MAGPIES: Math & Girls + Inspiration = Success

Lauren Rose, Bard College
Amanda Landi, Bard College at Simons Rock
Jazmin Zamora Flores, Bard College
Shea Roccaforte, Bard College
Philip Barnet, Bard College
Julia Crager, Bard College

Math in the Field: An Affordable and Scalable Cross-Disciplinary Undergraduate Research Project

Emily Hendryx, University of Central Oklahoma
Matthew Parks, University of Central Oklahoma
Andrew Taylor, University of Central Oklahoma

Hop-Skip-Slide: Number Line Fun!

Nina Cliff, Towson University
Skylar Benson, Towson University
Ruth White, Towson University

Other Mathematical Session

Building a Community of Practice in Scalable Corequisite Courses

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Join Dr. Jensen-Vallin and Hawkes Learning as they discuss how to design scalable corequisite courses to better prepare students for credit-bearing classes. Learn about the importance of building a community of practice, examining course placement processes and more.

Organizer
Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, Lamar University

Sponsor: Hawkes Learning

Other Mathematical Session

The Future of the Undergraduate Textbook

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., in the MAA Pavilion (Exhibit Hall)

What is the future of the textbook? Are we moving to a world of online open-access to all knowledge? If so, who will provide the editorial and quality-control value currently provided by publishers? What new features and benefits will be available for textbooks freed from the constraints of static print? How do we smoothly make the transition from our current system?

Please join us for a MathFest discussion with textbook and technology experts sponsored by the MAA and the AMS moderated by MAA Press Acquisitions Editor Stephen Kennedy.

Organizers/Panelists:
Stephen Kennedy, Carleton College
Sergei Tabachnikov, Pennsylvania State University
Matt Boelkins, Grand Valley State University
Suzanne Larson, Loyola Marymount University
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics (SIGMAA TAHSM) Business Meeting

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Organizers:
Chuck Garner, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology
Bill Shillito, Oglethorpe University

American Mathematics Competitions Session

CodeBreaking Game

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Led by AMC students, fun interactive game that allows students to solve cryptography problems individually or in breakout rooms. The solutions for each problem are the password for the following problem.

Organizers:
Serena An, Current AMC Student
Raymond Feng, Current AMC Student

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

A New Approach for Fighting Infectious Disease, Combining Game Theory and Graph Theory

1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

Po-Shen Loh, Carnegie Mellon University

What happens when you've been thinking about graph theory and probability, and you're called to action to fight COVID?

The speaker will talk about his journey which uncovered a categorically new way to fight disease. It resulted in an app which is fundamentally different from every other app (and which resolves significant issues in "contact tracing apps").

Functionally, it gives you an anonymous radar that tells you how "far" away COVID has just struck. "Far" is measured by counting physical relationships separating you (https://novid.org, https://youtu.be/EIU-6FvwikQ).

The simple idea flips the incentives. Previous approaches focused on controlling you, preemptively removing you from society if you were suspected of being infected. This new tool lets you see incoming disease to defend yourself just in time. This uniquely aligns incentives so that even if everyone does what is best for themselves, they end up benefiting the whole. That solves the "tragedy of the commons", which has paralyzed much of the world.

This unique construction was made possible by many mathematical insights. During the talk, the speaker will highlight many places where it ended up being quite useful to have a history of thinking about research and competition math, and of interacting with the math enthusiast community.

Invited Paper Session

Surprising Discoveries by Amateur Mathematicians, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

This session will focus on sometimes overlooked non-professionals who have solved interesting mathematical problems or made significant contributions to mathematical knowledge. These persons had no formal education in higher mathematics and pursued mathematical investigations in their own way. Martin Gardner inspired such amateurs throughout his career. Indeed, he himself never completed a math course past high school, yet contributed new mathematical results, many of them published in award-winning MAA papers. From the 19th century and earlier, we will learn of the mathematical contributions of Benjamin Franklin, Mary Somerville, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Kirkman, Henry Dudeney, and Alicia Boole Stott. From the 20th century to the present, in addition to Gardner, we will learn of patent officer Harry Lindgren, artist George Odom, postal worker Robert Ammann, surgeon Jan Gullberg, artist Anthony Hill and others. On Saturday, the Martin Gardner Lecture will feature three other amateur mathematicians who made surprising discoveries: M.C. Escher, Marjorie Rice, and Rinus Roelofs.

Organizers:
Doris Schattschneider, Professor Emerita of Mathematics, Moravian College
Colm Mulcahy, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, Spelman College

‘The Philosopher in His Study, the Literary Lady in Her Boudoir’: How Mary Somerville Transcended the Amateur Status of 19th-century Scientific Women

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Brigitte Stenhouse, The Open University, UK

(CANCELED) The Exquisite Geometric Dissections of Harry Lindgren

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Greg N. Frederickson, Purdue University

(NEW)Henry Dudeney: Amateur Mathematician?

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Charles Ashbacher, Charles Ashbacher Technologies

Martin Gardner -- "Are you a mathematician?"

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Dana Richards, George Mason University

Some Remarks on George Odom, Artist and Amateur Geometer

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Doris Schattschneider, Professor Emerita of Mathematics, Moravian College

Anthony Hill and The Crossing Number

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Marcus Schaefer, DePaul University

Robert Amman (1946 - 1994): Postman and More

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Marjorie Senechal, Smith College

Questions and Wrapup

3:50 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Invited Paper Session

Eigenvalues and Graphs

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Graphs can be used to represent the relations (edges) between objects (vertices), and so play an important role both in theoretical as well as applied settings. One important tool in understanding graphs is through the use of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices associated with graphs; this is sometimes known as spectral graph theory. There are many possible matrices that can be explored and each one brings its own strengths and weaknesses into understanding graphs. This session will bring together a variety of viewpoints of how eigenvalues and graphs are connected.

Organizer:
Steve Butler, Iowa State University

Graphs, Eigenvalues, and COVID-19

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Jane Breen, Ontario Tech University

Fiedler Vectors with Unbalanced Sign Patterns

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Sooyeong Kim, University of Manitoba

Spectral Properties of the Exponential Distance Matrix

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Kate Lorenzen, Linfield University

Spectral Turán Problems

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Michael Tait, University of Villanova

Quantum Walks on Graphs

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Sabrina Lato, University of Waterloo

Addressing Graphs and Eigenvalues

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Sebastian Cioabă, University of Delaware

Invited Paper Session

Open & Accessible Problems for Undergraduate Research

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

More and more mathematics faculty members around the country are conducting math research with undergraduates. As the benefits to students and faculty of engaging in undergraduate research become apparent, the number of professors with an interest in doing undergraduate research grows. Indeed, many of us would like to begin a research project with students, but we may be unsure of how to choose problems that are accessible for students. The aim of this session is to have experienced undergraduate research mentors share open and accessible problems from a variety of mathematical fields that can be used to generate ideas for new undergraduate research projects.

Organizer:
Allison Henrich, Seattle University
Laramie Paxton, Marian University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Undergraduate Research (UR SIGMAA)

Knotted Undergraduate Research

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Colin Adams, Williams College

Computer Driven Questions and Theorems and in Geometry

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Moira Chas, Stony Brook University

Data-intensive Undergraduate Research Projects

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Kumer Das, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Elementary? Maybe for Watson....

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Tamas Forgacs, California State University, Fresno

Patterns in Trees

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Lara Pudwell, Valparaiso University

Getting Started in Sports Analytics Research

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Amanda Harsy, Lewis University

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, and Gambling, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encouraged.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (SIGMAA REC)

EvenQuads: A SET-like game

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Lauren Rose, Bard College

More Adventures in the Game of SET ® -- Transformations and Simulations

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Anne Quinn, Edinboro University of PA

A Combinatorial Magic Trick using the SET Deck

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Zhengyu Li, University of Toronto Mississauga
Parker Glynn-Adey, University of Toronto Mississauga

The 21 Card Trick and Its Generalization

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Dibyajyoti Deb, Oregon Institute of Technology

(CANCELED) Playing Blackjack with an Infinite Deck

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Michael Nathanson, Saint Mary's College of California

(CANCELED) Counting in Texas 42

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Jessica Oehrlein, Fitchburg State University

Lewis Carroll's Barbershop Puzzle

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Jason Rosenhouse, James Madison University

Why the Monty Hall Paradox Does Not Directly Apply to Deal or No Deal

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Christopher Ingrassia, Kingsborough Community College of the City University of New York

Statistical Analysis of the International Mathematical Olympiad

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Arthur Berg, Pennsylvania State University

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and Sports

1:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.

The expanding availability of play-by-play statistics, video-based spatial data, and other sports data have led to innovative sports analytics research with impacts on strategy and player evaluation. Other areas of research include ranking methods, predictive models, physics-based analysis, etc. Research presentations, expository talks, and pedagogical contributions are all welcome in this session. Projects accessible to or involving undergraduate students are particularly encouraged for submission.

Organizers:
Hope McIlwain, Mercer University
Russ Goodman, Central College

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematics and Sports (Sports SIGMAA)

Dancing through the Weights: Dancesport Scoring and Power Values

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Diana Cheng, Towson University
Peter Coughlin, University of Maryland College Park

May the Best Team Lose

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Jim Case

Approaching Scheduling Problems through a Mix of Combinatorics and Python Programming

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Sarah Blanset, Stevenson University
Josh Lang, Stevenson University

Classifying GOATs (like Brady, Russell and Ruth) by Measuring Their Tails

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Rick Cleary, Babson College
Steve Miller, Williams College

A Probabilist’s View of the Temporal Distribution of Triple Crown Winners

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Christopher Ingrassia, Kingsborough Community College of the City University of New York

NCAA Basketball Win Probability Model

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Noah Baker, Davidson College
Hope Anderson, Davidson College
Lucy Smith, Davidson College

Modeling the Influence of In-Match Dynamics on Tennis Outcomes

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Tim Zeitvogel, Pepperdine University
Timothy Lucas, Pepperdine University

Contributed Paper Session

Insights into Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning from the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

From the use of data to understand injustice or COVID-19, to the development of asynchronous materials, individuals teaching quantitative literacy and reasoning courses have adapted in multiple ways over the past two years. Presenters in this session will share problems and innovations from the past two years that provide new ways of thinking about teaching for quantitative literacy and reasoning.

Organizers:
Luke Tunstall, Trinity University
Mark Branson, Stevenson University
Catherine Crockett, Point Loma Nazarene University
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Quantitative Learning (SIGMAA QL)

Quantitative Literacy vs QAnon

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Gary Huey, Ferris State University

Hot Off The Press: Quantitative Literacy Work Inspired By The COVID-19 Pandemic

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Nathan Grawe, Carleton College

Eventmath: An Open-access, Community-built Repository Pairing Current Events and Math Lessons

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Greg Stanton, Higher Math Help
Brendan Sullivan, Emmanuel College

Grouping & Regrouping Quantitative Literacy

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Marian Anton, Central Connecticut State University
Karen Santoro, Central Connecticut State University

Contributed Paper Session

Ethnomathematics: Culture Meets Mathematics in the Classroom, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

As more institutions strive to present multicultural offerings, courses dedicated to or incorporating Ethnomathematics - the study of mathematical aspects of the cultures of different peoples - are becoming more popular. This session features talks that present research that has been successful in attracting and involving students in Ethnomathematics. Ideas and innovations in Ethnomathematics for its use in teaching are welcome.

Organizers:
Ximena Catepillan, Millersville University of Pennsylvania
Janet Beery, University of Redlands
Cynthia Taylor, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Sponsor: SIGMAA on the History of Mathematics (HOM SIGMAA)

Mathematics Within, Mathematics Without

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Thomas Gilsdorf, Central Michigan University

Teaching a Project-Based Ethnomathematics Course Online

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Antonia Cardwell, Millersville University of PA
Erin Moss, Millersville University of PA

Minicourse

Application Inspired Linear Algebra: Using Data in the Classroom, Part A

1:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

This minicourse is designed for participants who wish to incorporate data applications into their linear algebra courses. It provides a hands-on introduction to two data applications that inspire a host of linear algebra topics in the classroom: brain scan tomography (3d image reconstruction) and heat diffusion (diffusion welding and image warping). Participants will work with these applications using either Matlab or Octave (some prior experience is recommended, but is not required). The Matlab/Octave code for the minicourse can all be run online, so participants have the option of using Matlab/Octave installed on their own computers or using Octave-Online through their web browser. The provided code and materials are written to be used directly in an undergraduate linear algebra course. Each day of the minicourse will conclude with a dialogue on various possible customization depending on student and institutional differences.

Organizers:
Heather Moon, Washington State University
Thomas J. Asaki, Washington State University
Marie A. Snipes, Kenyon College
Amanda Harsy, Lewis University
Michael Smith, Lewis University

Sponsor: Octave Online

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Undergraduate Student Paper Sessions

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUS)

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Please find the full schedule of talks and list of abstracts here.

Organizers:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University
Frank Patane, Samford University

Sponsor: Pi Mu Epsilon (PME)

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME) Business Meeting

1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

Organizer:
Nicole Infante, West Virginia University

Contributed Paper Session

Modeling in Your Differential Equations Course - Just Do It, Part B

2:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

Differential equations is a natural course for modeling. More faculty use modeling. From the literature, workshops, talks, personal exchanges, etc. colleagues hear how others use modeling and decide to Just Do It! We propose this session as a way to share experiences with specific illustrations of how modeling is used to motivate students while working with them to enhance their skills in both differential equations and its applications.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Janet Fierson, LaSalle University
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Sponsor: SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations

Course Correction: Adjusting to Meet Student Needs

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Lisa Bromberg, Springfield College

Memorization: A Data-Driven Activity for Modeling and Reflecting on Learning

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Brynja Kohler, Utah State University
Will Tidwell, Utah State University

Implementing in R a Generalized Hill-Keller Model Fitted to Usain Bolt’s Olympic Data

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Boyan Kostadinov, New York City College of Technology, CUNY

Desmos and Dynamics

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
L. Felipe Martins, Cleveland State University
Ieda Rodrigues, Cleveland State University
Shawn Ryan, Cleveland State University

Puff Puff, Toss Toss, Splish Splash, and Fit Fit - Modeling Using Differential Equations and Data

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE

Predicting Network Degree Distribution with Simple Differential Equations

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Dan Teague, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Other Mathematical Session

The WeBWorK Project Open Office Hour

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., in the MAA Pavilion (Exhibit Hall)

Let's celebrate 25 years of WeBWorK! Now with over 50,000 questions in the Open Problem Library from basic algebra up through linear algebra and differential equations and also other STEM areas including physics, chemistry, and engineering. Visit our exhibit to demo new WeBWorK features, get your questions about WeBWorK answered, and learn how you can get involved.

Organizers/Panelists
Monica VanDieren, Robert Morris University, The WeBWorK Project
Robin Cruz, University of Idaho, The WeBWorK Project
Marianna Bonanome, City Tech CUNY, The WeBWorK Project
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, The WeBWorK Project

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Statistics Education (SIGMAA Stat-Ed) Business Meeting

2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Organizer:
Phil Yates, DePaul University

American Mathematics Competitions Session

MAA AMC Curriculum Inspirations Session 2

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Using AMC problems for dives into beautiful and deep mathematics! Every problem explored (maybe solved-- or not!) is an invitation to ponder, wonder, and explore more. See how one can take a single AMC problem and use it as a portal to even more wondrous mathematics.

Organizer:
James Tanton, MAA Mathematician at Large

Contributed Paper Session

MathArt, ArtMath at MathFest, Part A

2:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

This session focuses on experiences at the intersection of mathematics and any of the visual, performing, musical, architectural, literary, fiber, sculptural, or other arts. Explore aesthetic expressions of mathematics and mathematics in practicing the arts. If scholarly or aesthetic engagement at this intersection helped get you through this pandemic year, come and share in this session.

Organizer:
Douglas Norton, Villanova University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematics and Arts (ARTS SIGMAA)

Collaboration in the Time of COVID

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Jessica K. Sklar, Pacific Lutheran University
Bronna Butler, B.A. Baroque Arts, LLC

Art from Langford Sequences

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
David Reimann, Albion College

Hexastix Design Principles and Problems: Homogenous Non-intersecting Cylinder Arrangements

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Anduriel Widmark, Artist

A Geometry/Art Assignment with a Non-Euclidean Kaleidoscope

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Frank Farris, Santa Clara University

Invited Address

NAM David Harold Blackwell Lecture

2020 Census, Lagrange's Identity, and Apportionment of the U.S. House of Representatives

3:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.

Tommy Wright, U.S. Bureau of the Census

Given the impracticality of a pure democracy, the U.S. Constitution (1787) calls for a representative form of democracy where the people elect persons to represent them for governing. Each state gets a number of representatives in the U.S. House of Representatives "...according to their respective numbers..." as recorded in a census of the nation to be conducted every ten years starting in 1790. We make use of an elementary result known as Lagrange's Identity to provide a bridge between an insightful motivation and an elementary derivation of the method of equal proportions. The method of equal proportions is the current method for apportioning the 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives among the 50 states, following each decennial census. We highlight why the numbers from the census matter and affect our condition and behavior. We also present some historical comments about the first two methods of apportionment, as well as the method that preceded equal proportions.

Contributed Paper Session

Alternative Assessments: Lessons from the Pandemic, Part D

3:00 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.

The pandemic has forced us to rethink assessments of student learning. The past year has led to creative solutions, such as the use of mastery grading systems and various educational technologies. In this session, speakers will share their strategies, successes, and the challenges they faced in assessment during the COVID pandemic, and how these might be used in the future.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg University
Beste Gucler, U Mass Dartmouth
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University

Using Portfolios and Refection As an Alternative to Final Exams

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Sarah Wolff, Denison University

Teacher-Designed Mathematics Portfolio Assessments: Motivations, Potential Benefits, and Lessons Learned

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Geoff Krall, University of Wyoming

Turning Standards into Writing Assignments

3:40 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
Joshua Bowman, Pepperdine University

American Mathematics Competitions Session

Math Department Virtual Showcase, Part I

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Join faculty from six universities in two separate sessions to learn about their mathematics programs, opportunities, and campus life! Department Chairs, Professors, and alumni will share information, student experiences, and answer your most pressing questions.

Make contacts at great schools, and get some insights from those who've gone before you. At each session, speakers from three universities will each present materials about their school and participate in Q&A.

Panelists:
Suzanne Dorée, Augsburg University
John Zobitz, Augbsburg University
Marjorie Darrah, West Virginia University
Ela Celikbas, West Virginia University
Sarah D. Olson, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Jon P. Abraham, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Leah Mitchell, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA for the Philosophy of Mathematics (POM SIGMAA) Guest Lecture

As-if Mathematics Were True

3:10 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Elaine Landry, University of California - Davis

Central claim: When we shift our focus from solving philosophical problems to solving mathematical ones, we see that an as-if methodological interpretation of mathematical structuralism can be used to provide an account of both the practice and the applicability of mathematics whilst avoiding the conflation of mathematical and metaphysical considerations. Time for discussion with the audience will be included. This talk should be accessible to mathematicians at all levels with some interest in the philosophy of mathematics.

Organizer:
Bonnie Gold, Monmouth University


Friday, August 6

Invited Address

Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecture Series

Probability and the Geometry of the Laplacian and Other Operators, Lecture II

10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

Rodrigo Bañuelos, Purdue University

The classical isoperimetric property (inequality) states that among all figures of equal area, the circle has the smallest perimeter. Equivalently, among all figures of equal perimeter, the circle encloses the largest area. In the first of these two talks the speaker will explore this property and its elegant connections (and generalizations) to Brownian motion and eigenvalues of the Laplacian. The notion of "stability" in these inequalities will be addressed and open problems will be mentioned. Departing from this, the second talk explores the question in the title of M. Kac’s famous 1966 paper "Can one hear the shape of a drum?" in the context of the geometry of the fractional Laplacian. Equivalently, by observing the trajectories of certain stochastic processes known as stable processes.

These talks are both expository, designed for general audiences. While interconnected, they are largely independent of each other. These talks intent to illustrate G. Pólya's statement that "the isoperimetric theorem, deeply rooted in our experience and intuition so easy to conjecture, but not so easy to prove, is an inexhaustible source of inspiration” from his book "Mathematics and Plausible Thinking.”

Contributed Paper Session

Computational Investigation in Undergraduate Mathematics, Part B

10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Computational tools help students explore mathematical concepts, formulate questions, and test conjectures. This session will highlight strategies for incorporating computational mathematics into the undergraduate math curriculum. We encourage talks on computational investigation of mathematical topics, the interplay of computation and proof, computation in the development of mathematical maturity, and assessment of computational learning goals.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

Computational Explorations in Abstract Algebra

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Karen Briggs, University of North Georgia
Caylee Spivey, University of North Georgia

On a Divisor of the Central Binomial Coefficient

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Matthew Just, University of Georgia
Maxwell Schneider, University of Georgia

Matrix Representations in Introductory Group Theory

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Paul Becker, Penn State Behrend

Using Computer Simulation to Understand Fractals and Billiards

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Robert Niemeyer, Metropolitan State University of Denver

Computational Discovery-Based Investigations in Calculus

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Feryal Alayont, Grand Valley State University

Inclusion of Computational Methods in Undergraduate Mathematics

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Sedar Ngoma, SUNY Geneseo

Contributed Paper Session

Math in Action, Part B

10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Mathematics is in action within many beautiful non-mathematical settings, spanning from interplays with the sciences, to unexpected applications to games, art, social justice, and economics, among others. This session invites presenters to share work in which mathematics is used in another field. We encourage joint presentations by teams or advisor-student pairs. This session is in conjunction with the IPS “Women In Math: Math In Action”

Organizers:
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Sarah Wolff, Denison University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Emelie Kenney, Siena College

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

Math-Stat Modeling in Non-STEM Disciplines: A Preliminary Report

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Reza Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University
Mike Czuchry, Texas Lutheran University
John Sieben, Texas Lutheran University

Student Research Ideas in the Liberal Arts

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Heidi Hulsizer, Benedictine College

Developing First-Year College Students' Problem Solving Abilities through Game-Based Learning

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Adam Case, Drake University

Inverse Problems in Mitosis

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Alexis Varada, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Epidemiology and the SIR model: Historical Context to Modern Applications

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Francesca Bernardi, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Manuchehr Aminian, California State Polytechnic University Pomona

Modeling Early Pandemic CoVID-19 Spread: The IHME vs Me

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Genghmun Eng

Contributed Paper Session

Games in Math Circles, Part B

10:00 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.

We will focus on games in math circles. Such games are fun to play but they also offer opportunities for participants to think deeply about optimal strategies and do meaningful computations. Computer simulations of games or the coding of a master player that the circle can compete against are possibilities. Some games are not what they seem as they can be nearly determined by the opening setup but seeing this involves some deep funstration.

Organizer:
Edward C. Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Math Circles for Students and Teachers (SIGMAA MCST)

The Tamu Math Circle Apps Website

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Philip Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Carl Van Huyck, Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival
Joshua Goldstein, Texas A&M University

The Winner's Curse

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Theodore Alper, Stanford Online High School, Stanford Math Circle

Math Circles in Times of Physical Distancing

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Brandy Wiegers, Central Washington University
Emilie Hancock, Central Washington University
Dan Zaharopol, BEAM

INVERSE

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Ed Keppelmann, University of Nevada Reno

A Tale of Tic-Tac-Toe: A day of Student Curiosity and Exploration

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Nicole Fider, University of Arizona

Contributed Paper Session

MathArt, ArtMath at MathFest, Part B

10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

This session focuses on experiences at the intersection of mathematics and any of the visual, performing, musical, architectural, literary, fiber, sculptural, or other arts. Explore aesthetic expressions of mathematics and mathematics in practicing the arts. If scholarly or aesthetic engagement at this intersection helped get you through this pandemic year, come and share in this session.

Organizer:
Douglas Norton, Villanova University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematics and Arts (ARTS SIGMAA)

The Literary Incarnations of Perfectoid Diamonds

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles

Needlepoint Topology, Geometry, and Beyond

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Jeff Johannes, SUNY Geneseo

Using Embroidery to Visualize the Weather and More!

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Shemsi Alhaddad, University of South Carolina Lancaster

3D Printing Pre-Scored Origami Sheets

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Donald Plante, University of New Hampshire

Lasercut Rendered Surfaces, Traces, and Slices

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Jonathan Keiter, East Stroudsburg University

Papercrafted Mathematical Art

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Douglas Dunham, University of Minnesota Duluth
Lisa Shier, University of Maryland Global Campus

Workshop

S-STEM Pre-award: Elements of a Successful S-STEM Grant Proposal

10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

This workshop focuses on the NSF S-STEM grant pre-award phase. The RFP has requirements all proposals need to address, but only a few proposals get funded. What gives your proposal the edge? In this workshop, participants will engage with key elements of the application, have the opportunity to contrast successful and unsuccessful proposals, and workshop around their proposal ideas.

Organizers:
Ileana Vasu, Holyoke Community College
Yu-Ju Kuo, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Susan Pustejovsky, Alverno College
Oscar Vega, California State University Fresno
Rebekah Dupont, Augsburg University
Perla Myers, University of San Diego

Panel

Best Practices in Mathematics for the Health Sciences

10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

Students preparing for careers in the Health Sciences need quantitative skills that are somewhat different from both traditional college algebra and more recently developed quantitative reasoning courses. Recently, the MAA partnered with several other groups to form a task force to address this discrepancy. This session will focus on the work of that group, recently published national recommendations, as well as best practices in curriculum and pedagogy for math for the Health Sciences.

Organizers:
Kira Hamman, Penn State Mont Alto
Daniel Ozimek, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

Panelists:
Andrew Baxter, Penn State University Park
Glenn Murphy, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Victor Piercey, Ferris State University
Joan Zoellner, Charles A. Dana Center, The University of Texas at Austin

Panel

Career Paths in Business, Industry, and Government

10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

You're about to earn a degree in mathematics. Now what? You may be surprised to know that teaching isn't your only option; in the "real world” mathematical knowledge is a valued commodity, and there are many interesting job opportunities for mathematicians in business, industry, and government. Whether you are a mathematics student looking for a job once you graduate or an advisor looking for advice to give to future job-seeking students, this session will help you gain new perspectives on a range of career experiences and what employers value in their employees. Panelists will share their paths to their current positions and offer advice to others looking for employment in similar venues.

Organizers:
Emille Lawrence, University of San Francisco
Caroline Maher-Boulis, Lee University

Moderator:
Jeb Collins

Panelists:
Bonita Saunders, National Institute of Standards and Technology
Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University
Emilie Purvine, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Kevin Byrnes, DuPont Capital Management

Sponsor: Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUS) and Committee on Business, Industry, and Government (BIG)

Panel

Association for Women in Mathematics Panel - Inspiring Women in Mathematics

10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

Since its founding in 1971, the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) has been a force for positive change in the culture and demographics of the mathematics world and an effective voice of support for women in the mathematical sciences. This panel is one of several events to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the organization's founding. The panel will feature mathematicians who are founders and leaders of programs designed to encourage young women to engage in doing mathematics. Such programs offer high school students, undergraduate and graduate students with a strong interest in mathematics an opportunity to pursue more advanced mathematics while immersed in a community of other young women with similar interests. The panel will engage with the audience in a discussion about how math educators of any gender can support girls and women toward academic development at different critical stages.

Organizers:
Georgia Benkart, University of Wisconsin
Malena Español, Arizona State University
Magdalena Luca, MCPHS University

Panel Moderator:
Lauren Rose, Bard College

Panelists:
Deanna Haunsperger, Carleton College
Raegan Higgins, Texas Tech University
Katherine Ott, Bates College
Julianna Tymoczko, Smith College
Judy Walker, University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Undergraduate Student Paper Sessions

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUS)

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Please find the full schedule of talks and list of abstracts here.

Organizers:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University
Frank Patane, Samford University

Sponsor: Pi Mu Epsilon (PME)

American Mathematics Competitions Session

Quantitative Decision Making in Sports

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Session to examine how quantitative methods are used to optimize “Game Winning Chance” in sports. Specific examples from the NFL, will reveal how computer models can overturn conventional coaching wisdom.

Organizers:
Frank Frigo, Co-Founder, EdjSports
Daniel Stern, Baltimore Ravens
Tim Chartier, Davidson College

Networking Session

NSF Funding Opportunities in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources

10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) offers multiple grant programs that promote research, innovations in learning and teaching and/or infrastructural support in the mathematical sciences. Program Officers from the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) will provide an overview of several programs that welcome submissions from the mathematical sciences community, discuss the NSF review process, and provide tips on effective proposal preparation. Participants will also have the opportunity to explore specific DUE programs through breakout sessions that will include ample time for discussion and Q&A.

Organizers:
Michael Ferrara, John Haddock, Sandra Richardson, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation

Exhibit Hall

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Visit the MAA Virtual Exhibit Hall to learn about new products and interact with MAA MathFest sponsors and exhibitors.

Invited Address

MAA James R.C. Leitzel Lecture

Lessons from 10+ Years of College Math Instructor Teaching Professional Development

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Stan Yoshinobu, University of Toronto

In this talk, I will highlight the intensive inquiry-based learning (IBL) workshop professional development model and findings from 10 years of data to identify key factors that influence uptake of IBL methods. IBL workshops can increase skills and knowledge, and ultimately influence instructor behavior in the classroom. Then using these insights, I’ll share thoughts on broader issues, including the general notion that intensive professional development workshops and follow-up support can be a key lever for change across a range of issues, such as inclusion and equity, mastery-based grading, course coordination, and more.

American Mathematics Competitions Session

Math Department Virtual Showcase, Part II

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Join faculty from six universities in two separate sessions to learn about their mathematics programs, opportunities, and campus life! Department Chairs, Professors, and alumni will share information, student experiences, and answer your most pressing questions.

Make contacts at great schools, and get some insights from those who've gone before you. At each session, speakers from three universities will each present materials about their school and participate in Q&A.

Panelists:
Michael Stewart, Georgia State University
Arun Suresh, Georgia State University
Jennifer Austin, University of Texas at Austin
Kaitlyn Muller, Villanova University

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Prize Session

Celebrate with the MAA Writing Award Winners from 2020 and 2021

11:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This year the MAA Prize Winners will be celebrated over the course of MathFest. We invite everyone to join us and congratulate our prize winners from 2020 and 2021.

Winners of Allendoerfer, Evans, Halmos-Ford, Hasse, Pólya, Solow, Beckenbach, Chauvenet, or Euler Awards, together with their friends and fans are invited to meet with winners and congratulate them on their achievements.

The second in a series of activities to celebrate and recognize the people that bring their wits, strength, and love to help the MAA community flourish.

Hosts:
Jenny Quinn, MAA President, University of Washington, Tacoma
Michael Dorff, MAA Past President, Brigham Young University

Other Mathematical Session

Virtual Math Escape Room

12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m., in the MAA Pavilion (Exhibit Hall)

This social event has some of the feel of a virtual escape room in that you will work in teams to open locks, collect clues, and eventually escape a myriad list of problems that you could confront at a virtual conference. You will not actually be locked in a room, but rather, locked out of a fun math conference, MathPuzzleCon. Feel free to come with your own team of 3-4 people, or come alone and meet new people.

Organizers/Panelists:
Julie Barnes, Western Carolina University
Shih-Wei Chao, University of North Georgia
Rachel Epstein, Georgia College
Kerri Jamerson, Mars Hill University
Wei-Kei Lai, University of South Carolina at Salkehatchie
Allie Ray, Birmingham-Southern College
Laura Steil, Mars Hill University

Contributed Paper Session

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, CSU Long Beach
Nicole Infante, West Virginia University
Shiv Karunakaran, Michigan State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

Collaborative Creativity in Proving: Adapting a Measurement Tool for Group Use

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Amanda Lake Heath, Middle Tennessee State University

Supporting Student Learning through Active Engagement: A Case Study of the Corequisite Model

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Amelia Stone-Johnstone, California State University at Fullerton

The Road Not Taken: A Comparison of Precalculus Pathways

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Ander Erickson, University of Washington Tacoma
Zaher Kmail, University of Washington Tacoma
Bonnie Becker, University of Washington Tacoma

PRACTIS (Precalculus Review and Calculus Topics in Sync): A Linked Remediation Program for Calculus I

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Marilyn Reba, Georgia State University
Dianna McGinnis, Georgia State University

Predicting Mathematics Exam-related Self-Efficacy As a Function of Prior Achievement, Gender, Stress Mindset, and Achievement Emotions

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Kaitlin Riegel, University of Auckland
Tanya Evans, University of Auckland
Jason Stephens, University of Auckland

Supporting Student Success in Virtual Corequisite Course

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Hadas Moshonov-Cohavi, Avila University

Contributed Paper Session

Computational Investigation in Undergraduate Mathematics, Part C

1:00 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.

Computational tools help students explore mathematical concepts, formulate questions, and test conjectures. This session will highlight strategies for incorporating computational mathematics into the undergraduate math curriculum. We encourage talks on computational investigation of mathematical topics, the interplay of computation and proof, computation in the development of mathematical maturity, and assessment of computational learning goals.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, St. Olaf College

Investigating Competitive Graph Coloring with Unity

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Jeb Collins, University of Mary Washington

An Image Processing Tour of Undergraduate Math

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Yevgeniy Galperin, East Stroudsburg University of PA

Computational Modeling with Real-World Data for Prospective Mathematics Teachers

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Boyan Kostadinov, New York City College of Technology, CUNY
Ariane Masuda, New York City College of Technology, CUNY
Nadia Kennedy, New York City College of Technology, CUNY

Contributed Paper Session

MathArt, ArtMath at MathFest, Part C

1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m

This session focuses on experiences at the intersection of mathematics and any of the visual, performing, musical, architectural, literary, fiber, sculptural, or other arts. Explore aesthetic expressions of mathematics and mathematics in practicing the arts. If scholarly or aesthetic engagement at this intersection helped get you through this pandemic year, come and share in this session.

Organizer:
Douglas Norton, Villanova University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematics and Arts (ARTS SIGMAA)

Melodies As Curves

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Steven Wilkinson, Northern Kentucky University
Peter Lefkovitz, Northern Kentucky University

The Strange Story of Solresol

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Larry Blaine, Plymouth State University

Stochastic Snare Drums and Transition-Matrix Tom-Toms: Composing Rock Drum Kit Solos Using Stochastic Processes

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Joshua Holden, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Mathematical Art Diversions - A Puzzle and a Gift

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Debra Hydorn, University of Mary Washington

Honors Colloquium on Mathematics and the Arts

2:20 p.m - 2:35 p.m.
Roza Aceska, Ball State University

Dance and Topology

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Karl Schaffer, De Anza College and MoveSpeakSpin

Contributed Paper Session

Rethinking Mathematics Placement, Part C

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

There is a need to reexamine mathematics placement policies and procedures, especially within the context of the pandemic. Many colleges and universities are doing away with measures like SAT/ACT. Studies show that placement exams introduce biases. Placing students accurately is crucial, as misplacement leads to long-term negative effects. Speakers in this session will share their experiences with placement processes.

Organizers:
Alexandria Theakston Musselman, University of Washington Bothell
Emily Gismervig, University of Washington Bothell
Nicole Hoover, University of Washington Bothell

Preparing for Significant Placement Revision

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Daniel Jordan, Columbia College

Methodology to Estimate and Evaluate Error Rates for Mathematics Placement Policies

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Kristin Frank, Towson University
Alexei Kolesnikov, Towson University
Xiaoyin Wang, Towson University

Lessons from a Homegrown Placement Test

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Dave Rosoff, The College of Idaho
Robin Cruz, The College of Idaho

Anti-Deficit Placement Practices

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Sherrie Serros, Mount Mary University

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula, Part A

1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Presentation topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Tim Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (Bio SIGMAA)

Citizen Science, Big Data, and Mathematical Biology Educationological

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Tyler Hagerty, University of Delaware
John Jungck, University of Delaware

Calculus Driven by Pandemic Data

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Aaron Wootton, University of Portland
Deborah Hughes-Hallet, University of Arizona / Harvard Kennedy School

Teaching Modeling and Dynamics to Biology Freshmen: The UCLA Experience

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Alan Garfinkel, University of California Los Angeles
Erin Sanders O’Leary, University of Illinois, Chicago
Hannah Sayson, University of California Los Angeles
Casey Shapiro, University of California Los Angeles
William Conley, University of California Los Angeles
Marc Levis-Fitzgerald, University of California Los Angeles
M. Kevin Eagan, University of California Los Angeles
Blaire Van Valkenburgh, University of California Los Angeles

A Systems Biology Course for Non-Majors

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College

Initiating a Translational Bio-Mathematics Research Seminar for College Students

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Emma Turian, Northeastern Illinois University
Lidia Filus, Northeastern Illinois University

Long-Term Student Research Projects Involving Modeling with Agent-Based Models and Impulsive Differential Equations

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Timothy Comar, Benedictine University

Contributed Paper Session

Modeling in Your Differential Equations Course - Just Do It, Part C

1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Differential equations is a natural course for modeling. More faculty use modeling. From the literature, workshops, talks, personal exchanges, etc. colleagues hear how others use modeling and decide to Just Do It! We propose this session as a way to share experiences with specific illustrations of how modeling is used to motivate students while working with them to enhance their skills in both differential equations and its applications.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Janet Fierson, LaSalle University
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Sponsor: SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations

How Long COVID-19 Takes to Gain Herd Immunity after Vaccination in Indonesia

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Prihantini Titin, Bandung Institute of Technology

From Curve Fitting to Differential Equations

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Deborah Hughes Hallett, University of Arizona / Harvard Kennedy School

TILT- and GRASPS-Inspired Implementation of a Semester-Long Modelling Project in Differential Equations

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Erin Kiley, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

Using Spring-Mass Systems to Study Financial Markets in a Differential Equations Class

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Ivan Dungan, Francis Marion University

Using Differential Equations to Model Individual Behaviors that Limit Disease Spread

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Cole Butler, North Carolina State University

Using the Slopes app to Enhance Modeling in Differential Equations

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Timothy Lucas, Pepperdine University

Contributed Paper Session

Using Inquiry and Collaboration in Faculty Professional Development during the Pandemic and Beyond, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Presenters will actively engage participants in scholarly conversations about using inquiry and collaboration in virtual and in-person professional development for college mathematics educators. Presenters are encouraged to share successes, challenges, and opportunities. Facilitators may introduce a specific activity or share best practices to: create community, ensure equity, foster engagement, or build specific skills, knowledge, or beliefs about teaching.

Organizers:
Nina White, University of Michigan
Patrick Rault, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy
Laura Watkins, Glendale Community College
Christine Von Renesse, Westfield State University

Sponsor: Communities for Mathematics Inquiry in Teaching Network & the MAA Committee on Professional Development

Online Working Groups as a Form of Professional Development

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Nathaniel Miller, University of Northern Colorado

The SA-COMMIT and CAST-Network Mathematics Initiative

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Priya Prasad, SA-COMMIT and University of Texas at San Antonio
Cody Patterson, SA-COMMIT and Texas State University
Oscar Garcia-Roman, San Antonio Independent School District
Melisa Walters, CAST Network

The “Faculty Fellowship and Coaching Program” of NE-COMMIT (New England Community for Mathematics Inquiry in Teaching)

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Nermin Bayazit, Fitchburg State University
Christine von Renesse, Westfield State University
Ileana Vasu, Holyoke Community College

MAA IP Guide Reading Group: What We Learned

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Benjamin Wilson, Stevenson University
Sarah Loeb, Hampden-Sydney College
Michael Stratyer, Hampden-Sydney College

Using Teaching TRIOs to Support Faculty Awareness and Responsiveness to Inclusivity in Mathematics and Science Classrooms

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Sarah Bleiler-Baxter, Middle Tennessee State University
Grant Gardner, Middle Tennessee State University
Gregory Rushton, Middle Tennessee State University
Olena James, Middle Tennessee State University
Fonya Scott, Middle Tennessee State University
Amanda Lake Heath, Middle Tennessee State University

Conversations in Chicagoland: A Way to Connect with Colleagues while Preparing for Pandemic Teaching and Beyond

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Sarah Bockting-Conrad, DePaul University
Elizabeth DeWitt, Trinity Christian College
Matthew Lee, Oakton Community College
Aliza Steurer, Dominican University
Lance Vobornik, Northern Illinois University

Poster Session

PosterFest 2021: Scholarship by Early Career Mathematicians

1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

This poster session and networking event provides an informal opportunity for early career mathematicians to present and discuss their scholarly activities (such as: expository work, preliminary reports, scholarship of teaching and learning, and research reports). Nontenured faculty and graduate students are encouraged to apply. Undergraduate submissions will not be accepted. Questions regarding this session should be sent to the organizers.

Organizers:
Holly Attenborough, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Lisa Driskell, Colorado Mesa University

Sponsor: The MAA Committee on Early Career Mathematicians (ECM)

Penguin Trail Networks: Applications of Graph Theory & Agent-Based Modeling

Emma Talis, Stony Brook University
Heather Lynch, Stony Brook Unviersity

Systematic Literature Review on Interventions for Math Anxiety at the Community College

Kristen Harvey, Washington State University

Creating a Data Science Program: Lessons Learned

Ariana Dundon, University of Washington | Bothell

Penalized Regressions with Different Tuning Parameter Choosing Criteria and the Application in Economics

Mingwei Sun, Samford University
Sheng Gao, Samford University

On Transient Analysis of Delta_n Markov Chains

Stephanie Reed, California State University, Fullerton
Elia Ziade, Palomar College

Recovering a Time-dependent Source Function in a Parabolic Equation

Sedar Ngoma, SUNY Geneseo

LEGO Duplo Activities for Calculus III

Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concorida University Chicago

Noether's Degree Bound Over the Exterior Algebra

Francesca Gandini, Kalamazoo College

Minicourse

Game Theoretic Modeling for Math Majors, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

This minicourse introduces some game theoretic tools (uitlity functions, strategic games of complete and incomplete information, and coalition games) and their application to economic, political, and biological scenarios. Along the way, participants will engage in games (perhaps winning some money or other prizes!) and discover some ways to incorporate activities and content into their own courses in game theory, modeling, or calculus.

Organizers:
David Housman, Goshen College
Richard Gillman, Valparaiso University

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Prize Session

Celebrate with MAA Service Awards Winners from 2020 and 2021

1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

This year the MAA Prize Winners will be celebrated over the course of MathFest. We invite everyone to join us and congratulate our prize winners from 2020 and 2021.

Winners of an MAA Award for Inclusivity, Certificate of Merit, Certificate for Meritorious Service, or the Gung and Hu Award together with their friends and fans are invited to meet with winners and congratulate them on their achievements.

The third in a series of activities to celebrate and recognize the people that bring their wits, strength, and love to help the MAA community flourish.

Hosts:
Jenny Quinn, MAA President, University of Washington, Tacoma
Michael Dorff, MAA Past President, Brigham Young University

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Undergraduate Student Paper Sessions

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUS)

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

Pi Mu Epsilon Student Paper Sessions

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Please find the full schedule of talks and list of abstracts here.

Organizers:
Darci Kracht, Kent State University
Frank Patane, Samford University

Sponsor: Pi Mu Epsilon (PME)

American Mathematics Competitions Session

Support Mathematical Creativity in Young Minds - Host an AMC Day

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Support your mathematics department by hosting an MAA AMC day. Hear from professors that are using the AMC to support mathematics in their communities, creating a fun engaging experience for K-12 teachers and students, and attracting the brightest mathematical minds to their colleges and univrsities.

Organizers:
Randy Cone, Salisbury University
Carl Yerger, Davidson College

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Sports (Sports SIGMAA) Business Meeting and Guest Lecture

1:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

The annual business meeting of the Sports SIGMAA. We will discuss SIGMAA activities, potential new ventures, budget issues, and also have a guest lecturer to talk about their experiences, activities, or perspectives on sports analytics. All are welcome!

Organizer:
Russ Goodman, Central College

Invited Address

AWM-MAA Etta Zuber Falconer Lecture

Complex Functions, Mesh Generation, and Hidden Figures in the NIST Digital Library of Mathematical Functions

2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Bonita V. Saunders, National Institute of Standards and Technology

In 2010, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) launched the Digital Library of Mathematical Functions (DLMF), a free online compendium of definitions, recurrence relations, differential equations, and other crucial information about mathematical functions useful to researchers working in application areas in the mathematical and physical sciences. Although the DLMF replaces the widely cited National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Handbook of Mathematical Functions commonly known as Abramowitz and Stegun (A&S), it is far beyond a book on the web, incorporating web tools and technologies for accessing, rendering, and searching math and graphics content. I will discuss some interesting historical tidbits, but then focus on past and present technical research challenges being tackled to develop the DLMF’s graphics content. The DLMF currently contains more than 600 2D and 3D figures, and over 200 interactive 3D web visualizations of high level mathematical function surfaces that users can explore.

Contributed Paper Session

Promoting Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice, Part C

2:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

National data trends and professional mathematics organizations call on mathematicians to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice in our classes and our departmental cultures. This session invites talks that describe approaches to enabling success of diverse students, incorporating social justice into curriculum, and fostering resilience and effective mindsets in their students.

Organizers:
Alex M. McAllister, Centre College
Robin Cruz, The College of Idaho
Joel Kilty, Centre College
Prayat Poudel, Centre College

Math for the People: A Radical New Approach to Quantitative Literacy

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Mark Branson, Stevenson University
Whitney George, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

Experiential Learning and Social Justice Math Class

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Linda Burks, Santa Clara University

Linear Algebra Group Projects to Promote Social Justice and Equity in Math Classrooms

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Filippo Posta, Estrella Mountain Community Collge

Other Mathematical Session

The WeBWorK Project Open Office Hour

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., in the MAA Pavilion (Exhibit Hall)

Let's celebrate 25 years of WeBWorK! Now with over 50,000 questions in the Open Problem Library from basic algebra up through linear algebra and differential equations and also other STEM areas including physics, chemistry, and engineering. Visit our exhibit to demo new WeBWorK features, get your questions about WeBWorK answered, and learn how you can get involved.

Organizers/Panelists
Monica VanDieren, Robert Morris University, The WeBWorK Project
Robin Cruz, University of Idaho, The WeBWorK Project
Marianna Bonanome, City Tech CUNY, The WeBWorK Project
Tim Flowers, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, The WeBWorK Project

American Mathematics Competitions Session

Award Winning Practices for Teaching K-12 Mathematics

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

How are award winning Edythe Mae Sliffe teachers supporting mathematics through AMC in their classrooms. Break-out rooms - Learn from each other: what works well for your students in your classroom, how are you engaging girls and other underrepresented groups in your classroom. End with open group discussion.

Organizer:
Charles R. Garner, Jr, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology

Invited Address

Christine Darden Lecture

The Road to 2002 Sonic Boom Demonstrator

3:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.

Christine Darden, Retired from NASA Langley Research Center

I will open the lecture with some explanation of my childhood, my elementary school education in a segregated school that taught no higher mathematics classes than Algebra and Plane Geometry, and my experience in Plane Geometry during 11th grade at a boarding school that also taught no higher math class. During that 11th grade experience, I fell in love with the class and decided that I wanted to be a mathematician. After high school graduation, I enrolled in a college where all of the students who were planning to become mathematicians had taken Calculus and Trigonometry in high school. I will then share how 5 years after graduating with a B.S. Degree in Math and Physics Education and after having taught high school mathematics & physics for 2 years and having earned a master’s degree in Applied Mathematics, I was hired by NASA as a Data Analyst (Computer) where I worked for 5 years supporting Engineers in the Apollo Program.The year was now 1972 and the United States has just cancelled its Commercial Supersonic Transport Program because of the noise of the sonic boom. I was transferred to a section created to work on the softening of the sonic boom of a supersonic airplane. I will then explain the process of the sonic boom work that resulted in a demonstration of the softened sonic boom.


Saturday, August 7

Invited Address

MAA Invited Address

Reflections in Teaching

10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

Candice Price, Smith College

This year, I realized that I have been teaching for 19 years. “How is this possible when you are only 25 years old?” you ponder, perhaps out loud. Well, first... thank you, and second, but it is true! It has been 19 years since I started teaching. And 2020 has really shown me how far that journey has been. So take a short jaunt with me down memory lane where together we will reflect on lessons I have learned about teaching, and of course places where I am hoping to improve.

Contributed Paper Session

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education, Part C

10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, CSU Long Beach
Nicole Infante, West Virginia University
Shiv Karunakaran, Michigan State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

How are Limits Commonly Introduced in Calculus? An Examination of Six Calculus Textbooks

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Joseph Antonides, The Ohio State University
Jim Fowler, The Ohio State University

The Impact of Attitudes on Achievement in an Active Learning Calculus Course

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Pablo Duran Oliva, Florida International University
Adam Castillo, Florida International University
Edgar Fuller, Florida International University
Charity Watson, Florida International University
Geoff Potvin, Florida International University
Laird Kramer, Florida International University

Development of Precalculus Proficiency During an Active Learning Calculus Course

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Charity Watson, Florida International University
Pablo Duran Oliva, Florida International University
Adam Castillo, Florida International University
Edgar Fuller, Florida International University
Geoff Potvin, Florida International University
Laird Kramer, Florida International University

Revised Calculus Concept Inventory: Early Development

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Barbara Moskal, Texas Tech University
Jerry Dwyer, Texas Tech University
Levi Johnson, Texas Tech University
G. Brock Williams, Texas Tech University
Jill White, Texas Tech University

Principles of Conceptual Assessment Design in Calculus I

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Zackery Reed, Oklahoma State University
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Michael Oehrtman, Oklahoma State University
Marilyn Carlson, Arizona State University

What Is Mathematics All About? Getting Insight into Freshman Calculus Students’ Mindset

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Mami Wentworth, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Mel Henriksen, Wentworth Institute of Technology
Caroline Merighi, Marquette University

Contributed Paper Session

Mathematics and the Life Sciences: Initiatives, Programs, Curricula, Part B

10:00 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.

The 2015 CUPM Curriculum Guide to Majors in the Mathematical Sciences identified the life sciences as a key path through the mathematics major to graduate programs and the workforce. Presentation topics include scholarly contributions addressing initiatives, programs, curricula, and course materials at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences that have been implemented and tested at institutions of higher education.

Organizers:
Tim Comar, Benedictine University
Raina Robeva, Randolph-Macon College
Carrie Diaz Eaton, Bates College

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematical and Computational Biology (Bio SIGMAA)

Breathing Life (Sciences) into Mathematics Courses

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Jillian Miller, Roane State Community College
Alys Hugo, Everett Community College

Sitting at the Intersection: Developing a “Just Enough” Mathematical Biology Curricula

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
John Zobitz, Augsburg University

A Topological and Non-Euclidian Dynamical Model of Biological Membranes

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Alexander Novakovic, Boston University

Contributed Paper Session

Modeling in Your Differential Equations Course - Just Do It, Part D

10:00 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.

Differential equations is a natural course for modeling. More faculty use modeling. From the literature, workshops, talks, personal exchanges, etc. colleagues hear how others use modeling and decide to Just Do It! We propose this session as a way to share experiences with specific illustrations of how modeling is used to motivate students while working with them to enhance their skills in both differential equations and its applications.

Organizers:
Brian Winkel, SIMIODE
Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College
Janet Fierson, LaSalle University
Therese Shelton, Southwestern University
Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College

Sponsor: SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations

HIV-AIDs Epidemics with Vaccination

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Reza Ahangar, Texas A & M University Kingsville

Three Sand Tank Groundwater Flow Experiments

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Michael Karls, Ball State University

Logistic Function and Its Application in Machine Learning

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Weiqun Zhang, Wright State University

Analysis of a Couple of Dynamical Systems Associated with Cancer Treatment

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Lubna Kadhim, Morgan State University

Melting Ice in Northern Seas due to the Global Warming: Self-similar Solution for Stefan’s Problem

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Viktoria Savatorova, Central Connecticut State University
Aleksei Talonov, University of Nevada Las Vegas

Contributed Paper Session

Alternative Assessments: Lessons from the Pandemic, Part E

10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

The pandemic has forced us to rethink assessments of student learning. The past year has led to creative solutions, such as the use of mastery grading systems and various educational technologies. In this session, speakers will share their strategies, successes, and the challenges they faced in assessment during the COVID pandemic, and how these might be used in the future.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg University
Beste Gucler, U Mass Dartmouth
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University

Supporting Students’ Decision-Making Process during Problem Solving in Online Introductory Calculus

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Danny Lara, Central Washington University
Emilie Hancock, Central Washington University

Motivational Formative Assessment in a Synchronous Online Advanced CalculusCourse

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Cristina Bacuta, University of Delaware

MyOpenMath and GeoGebra - Tools for Formative and Informative Learning Assessments

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Tuyetdong Phan-Yamada, Cal State Los Angeles

Using Play Posit and Nearpod as Assessment Tools in Remote Sessions

11:00 a.m. - 11:15
Louis Freese, Rocky Mountain Region

Competing for Connection: Using Virtual Trivia As a Formative Assessment

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Christoph Fischbacher, University of California, Irvine
Alessandra Pantano, University of California, Irvine

Redesigning Assessments for Increased Interactions, Reflections and Active Learning

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Sheila Tabanli, Rutgers University

Contributed Paper Session

Closing Wallets while Opening Minds: Adopting Open Educational Resources in Mathematics, Part A

10:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

An increasing number of authoring tools, learning platforms, and related technological enhancements continue to support the creation of open educational resources (OER) in mathematics and across disciplines, as well as push the boundaries in areas such as accessibility. This session will showcase recent developments in OER and highlight ways in which these resources are currently used in math curricula.

Organizers:
Britney Hopkins, University of Central Oklahoma
Benjamin Atchison, Framingham State University
James Quinlan, University of New England
Rob Beezer, University of Puget Sound
Oscar Levin, University of Northern Colorado
Sean Laverty, University of Central Oklahoma
Emily Hendryx, University of Central Oklahoma

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technologies in Mathematics Education (CTiME)

Open Mathematics: How to Reduce the Cost Burden for Entry-level Mathematics Students

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Taylor Kilman, Indian River State College

OER for College STEM courses

10:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Krassi Lazarova, Centenary University
Kathy Turrisi, Centenary University

Advancing Student Learning through Customized Open Education Resources

10:40 a.m. - 10:55 a.m.
Md Sazib Hasan, Dixie State University
Vinodh Chellamuthu, Dixie State University

Jupyter Books

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Ben Vanderlei, University of the Fraser Valley

Using a Free Geometry App and Activity-Based Text in a Course for Elementary Ed Majors

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Chris Oehrlein, Oklahoma City Community College

Use Kahoot and GeoGebra to Engage Students and Enhance Learning

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Yun Su, Indiana Tech

Panel

Implementation of Co-requisite Models

10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

Many states and institutions are moving to co-requisite models for developmental mathematics. This panel discusses best practices of such models, as well as issues with implementation. In particular, how does a state or system support co-requisite creation? Are there policies that impede the formation of a model? What is the process for creation of co-requisite courses at the institution level?

Organizers:
Jennifer Nordstrom, Linfield College
Wade Ellis, West Valley College, Retired

Panelists:
Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, Lamar University
Kathryn Kozak, Coconino Community College
Jessie Walker, Arkansas Department of Education
Linus Yu, University of Arkansas-Fort Smith

Sponsor: MAA Subcommittee on Curriculum Renewal Across the First Two Years (CRAFTY)

Panel

How to Apply for Jobs in Academia and Industry after Your PhD

10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

This session is aimed at graduate students and recent PhDs. An overview of the employment process will be given with ample opportunity for participants to ask questions. Questions that will be addressed include: How do you find which jobs are available? How do you choose which jobs you want to apply for? What are academic and other employers looking for in the materials that you send? How should you tailor your application materials for the job that you are applying for? How do schools conduct interviews?

Organizer:
Stefanie Wang, Smith College

Panelists:
Mimi Tsugura, Education Engineer at Elastic
Christine Kelley, University of Nebraska – Lincoln
Tian An Wong, University of Michigan – Dearborn

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Graduate Students

Panel

The Life Cycle of an Undergraduate Data Science Program

10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

Data science applies tools from computer science, statistics, and mathematics to understand data. Driven by growth in careers and increasing student interest, academic institutions have been developing a wide variety of data science programs. Speakers on this panel represent programs at various levels of development: from programs just leaving the visioning phase to those that have been established for years.

Organizer:
Liz Stanhope, Lewis & Clark College

Panelists:
Laurie Heyer, Davidson College
Matthew Neal, Denison University
Randy Paffenroth, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Talitha Washington, Clark Atlanta University and the Atlanta University Center

Sponsor: MAA Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM)

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Undergraduate Student Paper Sessions

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUS)

SIGMAA Activity

SIGMAA on Undergraduate Research (UR SIGMAA) Business Meeting and Guest Lecture

Using Restorative Practices to Build Research Communities

10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

Pamela Harris, Williams College

An invited talk by Professor Pamela Harris of Williams College, titled "Using restorative practices to build research communities," will be followed by the UR SIGMAA Business Meeting.

Organizers:
Anant Godbole, East Tennessee State University
Allison Henrich, Seattle University

American Mathematics Competitions Session

 

Fun Problem Session for Teachers and Students

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

The first step in solving any problem in math (or in life) is to be your fabulous honest human self and acknowledge your human reaction to it. Let's practice being human to solve problems and see how powerful and successful a willingness to flail and falter can be!

Organizer:
James Tanton, MAA Mathematician at Large

Exhibit Hall

10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Visit the MAA Virtual Exhibit Hall to learn about new products and interact with MAA MathFest sponsors and exhibitors.

Invited Address

Student Activity Speaker

We Begin with a Deck of Cards …

11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Robert W. Vallin, Lamar University

We all know there are lots of fun games and activities that come from a standard deck of cards. As they say during 3 a.m. infomercials, “But wait, there’s more!!” A deck is also the gateway to a myriad of different ideas in mathematics. In this event we start with some of the more straightforward ideas like counting and then move on to some other fun things that we can play with. If you have a deck of cards, keep them handy.

Contributed Paper Session

Math in Action, Part C

11:00 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.

Mathematics is in action within many beautiful non-mathematical settings, spanning from interplays with the sciences, to unexpected applications to games, art, social justice, and economics, among others. This session invites presenters to share work in which mathematics is used in another field. We encourage joint presentations by teams or advisor-student pairs. This session is in conjunction with the IPS “Women In Math: Math In Action”

Organizers:
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Sarah Wolff, Denison University
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Emelie Kenney, Siena College

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

How Close Was The 2020 US Presidential Election?

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Victoria Powers, Emory University

The Gateway to Richer Life

11:20 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.
Karthikeya Sameer Kumar Mamillapalle, Daytona State College

Desmos and GeoGebra3D Interactives in Calculus III: Visualizing the Bivariate Normal Distribution

11:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m.
Zachary Beamer, Piedmont Virginia Community College
Karolina Naranjo-Velasco, University of Virginia

Other Mathematical Session

MAA Prize Session

Celebrate with MAA Teaching and Research Award Winners from 2020 and 2021

12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

This year the MAA Prize Winners will be celebrated over the course of MathFest. We invite everyone to join us and congratulate our prize winners from 2020 and 2021.

Winners of an Alder, Dolciani, Haimo, or Selden Awards, together with their friends and fans are invited to meet with winners and congratulate them on their achievements.

The fourth in a series of activities to celebrate and recognize the people that bring their wits, strength, and love to help the MAA community flourish.

Hosts:
Jenny Quinn, MAA President, University of Washington, Tacoma
Michael Dorff, MAA Past President, Brigham Young University

Other Mathematical Session

Alder Award Session

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

The MAA established the Henry L. Alder Award for Distinguished Teaching by a Beginning College or University Mathematics Faculty Member to honor beginning college or university faculty members whose teaching has been extraordinarily successful and whose effectiveness in teaching undergraduate mathematics is shown to have influence beyond their own classrooms. Each year, at most three college or university teachers are honored with this national award. The awardees are invited to make a presentation in this session. The session is moderated by MAA President Jenny Quinn.

Moderator:
Jenny Quinn, MAA President, University of Washington, Tacoma

Three Uncomfortable Truths

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Alexander Diaz-Lopez, Villanova University

Any Questions?

1:25 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.
Andrew Penland, Western Carolina University

Seeking Wonder and Finding Adventure in Teaching and Learning Math

1:50 p.m. - 2:05 p.m.
Kim Seashore, San Francisco State University

Invited Paper Session

Women in Mathematics: Math in Action

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Mathematics is in action within so many exciting non-mathematical settings, spanning from classical historical and cutting edge interplays between mathematics and physics, biology, and other sciences, to beautiful applications of mathematics to games, art, social justice, economics, and climate change, to name a few. Topics with possibly unexpected applications outside of mathematics include complexity classes, Ramsey colorings, tropical numbers, topology, hyperbolic surfaces, geodesics, and more.

In this session, we showcase current research done by women (and their students) of mathematics and statistics applied to a variety of non-mathematical settings.

Organizer:
Cassie Williams, James Madison University
Shanna Dobson, California State University, Los Angeles
Janet Fierson, La Salle University
Emelie Kenney, Siena College
Sarah Wolff, Denison University

Sponsor: Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM)

Math, Medicine and Mysteries

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
Ami Radunskaya, Pomona College

Finding Atmospheric Features via Topological Data Analysis

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Lynne Seymour, University of Georgia

Analyzing Collective Motion with Machine Learning and Topology

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Lori Ziegelmeier, Macalaster College

Identifying Geohazards with Mathematics and Statistics

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Celes Woodruff, James Madison University

The Role of RdCVFL in a Mathematical Model of Photoreceptor Interactions

3:00 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Erika Tatiana Camacho, Arizona State University / National Science Foundation

Crochet Topology

3:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Moira Chas, Stony Brook University

Invited Paper Session

Supporting Student Success in Introductory Statistics through Evidence-Based Practices

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Each academic year, over 600,000 students enroll in college introductory statistics courses, according to the 2015 CBMS survey. Enrollments have more than doubled since 2000. Although many of the new statistics students have sufficient mathematics fluency to succeed, many others struggle with algebra, numeric operations, and logic, leading to poor course outcomes.

In this session, speakers will present evidence-based results from projects about supporting students enrolled in introductory statistics courses. Projects include identifying students in need of extra assistance with mathematical fluency and/or statistical content, and then implementing one of several ways to provide that assistance, including instructor-led sessions, computer-based support, and undergraduate-led supplemental instruction. Session speakers work at a variety of institutions, small and large, public and private. Though the context for the presentations is Introductory Statistics, the innovations and pedagogical practices presented are adaptable to any introductory college level mathematics course and have broader implications for supporting student success in first-year college level mathematics and statistics.

Organizers:
Judith Canner, California State Monterey Bay
Adam Molnar, Oklahoma State University

Sponsor:
SIGMAA on Statistics Education (SIGMAA StatEd)
ASA-MAA Joint Committee on Undergraduate Statistics and Data Science Education

Implementation and Continuation Issues for Supporting Underprepared Introductory Statistics Students Using an Assessment and Peer Tutoring Intervention Program

1:00 p.m. - 1:20 p.m.
M. Leigh Lunsford, Longwood University
Phillip L. Poplin, Longwood University
Leah N. Shilling-Stouffer, Longwood University

Computer-based Learning plus Tutoring in Essentials of Statistics

1:30 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Jayne Ann Harder, Oral Roberts University

Large Scale Peer-Assisted Tutoring, Corequisites, and Other Math Support for Introductory Statistics

2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Adam Molnar, Oklahoma State University

Corequisite Statistics Courses for Equitable Support of All Students

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Alana Unfried, California State University, Monterey Bay

Contributed Paper Session

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education, Part D

1:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

The goals of this session are to promote quality research in undergraduate mathematics education, to disseminate educational studies to the greater mathematics community, and to facilitate the impact of research findings on mathematics pedagogy. Presentations may be based on research in any undergraduate mathematical area. Examples include studies about students' reasoning, teaching practices, curriculum design, and professional development.

Organizers:
Brian Katz, CSU Long Beach
Nicole Infante, West Virginia University
Shiv Karunakaran, Michigan State University

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIGMAA on RUME)

Examining Elementary Pre-service Teachers’ Use of Visual Models in Fraction Addition and Subtraction Problems

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Sayonita Ghosh Hajra, Sacramento State
Topaz Wiscons, Sacramento State
Kimberly Elce, Sacramento State

(CANCELED) Exploring Introductory Linear Algebra As a Course and Prerequisite

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Anna Marie Bergman, Simon Fraser University
Dana Kirin, Portland State University

Linear Algebra Curriculum Study Group 2.0: Our Vision for a Change

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Sepideh Stewart, The University of Oklahoma

Student Understanding of Mathematical Induction in an Online Setting

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Jordan Kirby, Middle Tennessee State University
Sam Reed, Middle Tennessee State University
Sarah Bleiler-Baxter, Middle Tennessee State University

Ways of Thinking about Inverses across Contexts: A Systematic Literature Review

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Stephen Strand II, California State University Chico
Zackery Reed, Oklahoma State University
John Paul Cook, Oklahoma State University
April Richardson, Oklahoma State University

Examining Language across Contexts: Connecting Instruction and Problem-Solving

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Rachel Rupnow, Northern Illinois University

Exploring Undergraduate Students' Mathematical Reasoning via Problem Posing

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Joash Geteregechi, Ithaca College

Student Partnerships as a Mechanism to Elicit Student Engagement in Intro to Analysis Courses

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Abigail Higgins, California State University, Sacramento
Ryan Alvarado, Amherst College
Sayonita Ghosh Hajra, California State University, Sacramento

Contributed Paper Session

Recreational Mathematics: Puzzles, Card Tricks, Games, and Gambling, Part C

1:00 p.m. -1:55 p.m.

Puzzles, card tricks, board games, game shows, and gambling provide an excellent laboratory for testing mathematical strategy, probability, and enumeration. The analysis of such diversions is fertile ground for the application of mathematical and statistical theory. Solutions to new problems as well as novel solutions to old problems are welcome. Submissions by undergraduates are encouraged.

Organizers:
Paul R. Coe, Dominican University
Sara B. Quinn, Dominican University
Kristen Schemmerhorn, Concordia University Chicago
Andrew Niedermaier, Jane Street Capital

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Recreational Mathematics (SIGMAA REC)

Sum Amusements with Fibonacci and Other Linear Recurrence Sequences

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Edmund Lamagna, University of Rhode Island
Robert Ravenscroft, Rhode Island College

What Is the Collatz Conjecture and Why Is It So Interesting?

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Alexander Atwood, Suffolk County Community College
Russell Coe, Suffolk County Community College

A 3 X 3 Magic Square Consisting Of Consecutive Primes

1:40 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.
Jay Schiffman, Retired, Rowan University

Contributed Paper Session

Closing Wallets while Opening Minds: Adopting Open Educational Resources in Mathematics, Part B

1:00 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

An increasing number of authoring tools, learning platforms, and related technological enhancements continue to support the creation of open educational resources (OER) in mathematics and across disciplines, as well as push the boundaries in areas such as accessibility. This session will showcase recent developments in OER and highlight ways in which these resources are currently used in math curricula.

Organizers:
Britney Hopkins, University of Central Oklahoma
Benjamin Atchison, Framingham State University
James Quinlan, University of New England
Rob Beezer, University of Puget Sound
Oscar Levin, University of Northern Colorado
Sean Laverty, University of Central Oklahoma
Emily Hendryx, University of Central Oklahoma

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Technologies in Mathematics Education (CTiME)

Plotting Mathematical Structures in Minetest

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Kyle Claassen, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Rethinking Video Formats and Content Delivery in a Digital, Post-Pandemic World.

1:20 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Robert Niemeyer, Metropolitan State University of Denver

Panel

Three Mathematicians and One Math Education Researcher Share Lessons for Teaching Future Teachers

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

Teaching future K-12 teachers is challenging because teaching-to-teach requires a skill set beyond teaching mathematics. Often, young faculty members find themselves solely responsible for instructing future teacher content courses and have few available resources for guidance. In this panel, we explore effective methods for teaching preservice K-12 mathematics teachers. Join us as our panelists share key experiences and lessons learned.

Organizers:
Carl Olimb, Augustana University
Yvonne Lai, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Jennifer Whitfield, Texas A&M University

Panelists:
Amanda Ruiz, University of San Diego
Joe Champion, Boise State
Scott Kaschner, Butler University
Theresa Jorgensen, University of Texas at Arlington

Sponsor: SIGMAA on Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching (SIGMAA MKT)

Panel

The Art of Publishing in MAA Journals

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

The members of this panel will introduce the MAA publications, discuss how to write for these periodicals, and answer questions about writing for the publications. There will be time allotted to be meet with the individual editors to ask questions about specific journals and blogs.

Organizer:
Tom Edgar, Pacific Lutheran University, Editor of Math Horizons
Della Dumbaugh, University of Richmond, Editor-elect of The American Mathematical Monthly

Panelists:
Susan Jane Colley, The American Mathematical Monthly
Della Dumbaugh, The American Mathematical Monthly
Dominic Klyve, The College Math Journal
Amy Ackerberg-Hastings, Convergence Room
Janet Heine Barnett, Convergence Room
Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, MAA FOCUS
Tom Edgar, Math Horizons
Deanna Haunsperger, Math Values Blog
Jason Rosenhouse, Mathematics Magazine

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Journals

Minicourse

Application Inspired Linear Algebra: Using Data in the Classroom, Part A

1:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

This minicourse is designed for participants who wish to incorporate data applications into their linear algebra courses. It provides a hands-on introduction to two data applications that inspire a host of linear algebra topics in the classroom: brain scan tomography (3d image reconstruction) and heat diffusion (diffusion welding and image warping). Participants will work with these applications using either Matlab or Octave (some prior experience is recommended, but is not required). The Matlab/Octave code for the minicourse can all be run online, so participants have the option of using Matlab/Octave installed on their own computers or using Octave-Online through their web browser. The provided code and materials are written to be used directly in an undergraduate linear algebra course. Each day of the minicourse will conclude with a dialogue on various possible customization depending on student and institutional differences.

Organizers:
Heather Moon, Washington State University
Thomas J. Asaki, Washington State University
Marie A. Snipes, Kenyon College
Amanda Harsy, Lewis University
Michael Smith, Lewis University

Sponsor: Octave Online

Undergraduate Student Paper Session

MAA Undergraduate Student Paper Sessions

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Organizers:
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross
Chasen Smith, Georgia Southern University

Sponsor: MAA Committee on Undergraduate Students (CUS)

American Mathematics Competitions Session

Fireside Chat

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

An informal, interactive hangout with the nation's leading AMC competitors! We're exploring all things math competitions: experiences, myths, and advice. This is a student-led, student-only event.

Organizer:
Nicole Goberdhan, Mathematical Association of America

Panelists:
Serena An, AMC Math Olympian
Gopal Goel, AMC Math Olympian
Pravalika Putalapattu, AMC Math Olympian
Isabella Quan, AMC Math Olympian
Luke Robitaille, AMC Math Olympian
Alexander Rudenko, Olympian Leader

Networking Session

How to Run a Math Festival

1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

The Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival will host an interactive session on how to organize a mathematics festival in your community, either virtual or in-person. Topics include logistics, activity selection, and funding. The session will feature some of our favorite activities.

Organizer:
Daniel Kline, Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival
Annette Rouleau, Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival

Contributed Paper Session

Using Inquiry and Collaboration in Faculty Professional Development during the Pandemic and Beyond, Part C

2:00 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.

Presenters will actively engage participants in scholarly conversations about using inquiry and collaboration in virtual and in-person professional development for college mathematics educators. Presenters are encouraged to share successes, challenges, and opportunities. Facilitators may introduce a specific activity or share best practices to: create community, ensure equity, foster engagement, or build specific skills, knowledge, or beliefs about teaching.

Organizers:
Nina White, University of Michigan
Patrick Rault, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Amy Ksir, United States Naval Academy
Laura Watkins, Glendale Community College
Christine Von Renesse, Westfield State University

Sponsor: Communities for Mathematics Inquiry in Teaching Network & the MAA Committee on Professional Development

International Online Professional Development for Mathematics Faculty and Teachers

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Deependra Budhathoki, Ohio University
Gregory D. Foley, Ohio University
Marian Prince, Andrews University
Binod P. Pant, Kathmandu University

Affordances and Challenges of Multi-Day Virtual PD

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Elizabeth Thoren, Pepperdine University

Putting (Good) Old Wine in a New Bottle: Adapting Face-to-Face Workshops for Online Delivery

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Sandra Laursen, University of Colorado - Boulder
Devan Daly, University of Colorado - Boulder

Contributed Paper Session

Alternative Assessments: Lessons from the Pandemic, Part F

2:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

The pandemic has forced us to rethink assessments of student learning. The past year has led to creative solutions, such as the use of mastery grading systems and various educational technologies. In this session, speakers will share their strategies, successes, and the challenges they faced in assessment during the COVID pandemic, and how these might be used in the future.

Organizers:
David Clark, Grand Valley State University
Mike Janssen, Dordt University
Austin Mohr, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Mariah Birgen, Wartburg University
Beste Gucler, U Mass Dartmouth
Michael Tallman, Oklahoma State University
Jessica OShaughnessy, Shenandoah University

Oral Exams for College Geometry

2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Holly Attenborough, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Online Assessment in STEM Courses through Student Presentations

2:20 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Eugene Yablonski, University of the Fraser Valley

Using Daily Discussion Boards to (Virtually) Assess Concept Mastery

2:40 p.m. - 2:55 p.m.
Jenna Carpenter, Campbell University

Teaching, Assessment and Directing a Virtual Multi-Section Course

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Katarzyna Kowal, Ramapo College of New Jersey

Engaging Students in Learning in Large Online Classes

3:20 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.
Seongchun Kwon, University of Central Florida

Networking Session

MAA Instructional Practices Guide Networking and Q&A Session

2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

The MAA Instructional Practices Guide was designed to share effective, evidence-based practices that instructors can use to facilitate meaningful learning for students of mathematics. At this session, participants will have their questions about the guide answered by experts and will be able to share their own innovations with the guide. As a networking session, participants will also have the opportunity to connect with others to form reading groups to explore the guide, or to join working groups to innovate in ways that expand on or complement the guide.

Organizers:
Jane Long, Stephen F. Austin State University
Juliana Belding, Boston College
Russell Goodman, Central College

Sponsor: MAA Committee on the Teaching of Undergraduate Mathematics (CTUM)

Panel

Supporting Your Department's VITAL Faculty

2:30 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.

Visiting faculty, instructors, non-student TAs, adjunct faculty, and lecturers -- collectively VITAL faculty, or generally non-tenure track -- are becoming increasingly more common in many math departments. Panelists from a variety of institutions, including VITAL faculty, will discuss ways in which departments can best support this group. VITAL faculty on the panel will discuss departmental culture and practices that are most supportive. Departmental representatives will talk about their own practices for supporting these needs. Panelists will share their perspectives and there will be time for questions, input from the audience, and conversation. We hope that the audience will be able to share their ideas and get inspiration for their own faculty and institution. This panel is sponsored by the Membership Committee and aligns with the current emphasis on how the MAA can best support VITAL faculty.

Organizer:
Emilie Purvine, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Panelists:
Robert Snellman, Brigham Young University
April Strom, Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Hanna Bennet, University of Michigan
Jacqueline Jensen-Vallin, Lamar University
Benjamin Brubaker, University of Minnesota

Sponsor: MAA Membership Committee

Invited Address

Martin Gardner Lecture

Surprising Discoveries by Three Amateur Mathematicians

3:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.

Doris Schattschneider, Professor Emerita of Mathematics, Moravian College

It is amazing how intense curiosity and ingenuity can propel persons with little or no higher mathematical training to investigate mathematical problems and make surprising discoveries. Dutch graphic artist M.C. Escher (1898-1972), a failure at school mathematics, found answers to the question “Characterize shapes that will tile the plane in such a way that every tile is surrounded in the same manner.” American homemaker Marjorie Rice (1923-2017), not allowed any math beyond a high school general math course, found new answers to the question “Characterize convex pentagons that can tile the plane.” And Dutch sculptor Rinus Roelofs (b. 1954), with an undergraduate degree in applied mathematics and a degree from AKI School of Arts, discovered a new infinite family of uniform polyhedra through sculptural exploration. This lecture will give glimpses of how these three each asked and answered mathematical questions in their own unique way.

Networking Session

Spectra: A Gathering for LGBTQ+ Mathematicians and Allies

3:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.

Spectra, the association for LGBTQ+ mathematicians, is organizing this social/informational event for LGBTQ+ mathematicians and their allies to network with each other and learn more about upcoming opportunities and events highlighting the sexual orientation and gender identity diversity in the mathematics community.

Organizers:
Ron Buckmire, Occidental College
Christopher Goff, University of the Pacific

 

Year: 
2021